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ePub The Digital Bits Insider's Guide to DVD download

by Todd Doogan,Bill Hunt

ePub The Digital Bits Insider's Guide to DVD download
Author:
Todd Doogan,Bill Hunt
ISBN13:
978-0071418522
ISBN:
0071418520
Language:
Publisher:
McGraw-Hill/TAB Electronics; 1 edition (September 26, 2003)
Category:
Subcategory:
Engineering
ePub file:
1597 kb
Fb2 file:
1934 kb
Other formats:
docx mobi lit lrf
Rating:
4.9
Votes:
985

Insider's Guide To DVD. I first became aware of this book that Bill Hunt and Todd Doogan were writing over a year . At just over 400 pages, The Digital Bits: Insider's Guide To DVD is a very easy read. You can pretty much flip through the pages and find something that will catch your eye.

At just over 400 pages, The Digital Bits: Insider's Guide To DVD is a very easy read. Newbies to the DVD/Home Theater experience will spend more time scouring through the first 84 pages of the book.

Start by marking The Digital Bits Insider's Guide to DVD (Digital Video and Audio) as Want to Read . The greatest book that's every been written in the history of books! That Bill Hunt and Todd Doogan, they're just swell guys. Every home on Earth should have a copy.

Start by marking The Digital Bits Insider's Guide to DVD (Digital Video and Audio) as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Bill Hunt, Todd Doogan. Place of Publication. He writes regularly for Video Store, Computer Power User, and is also a film archivist for the Turner Broadcasting System. The Digital Bits (ww. hedigitalbits. com) is regarded by industry professionals as the leading source of reliable DVD information. The site is widely read within the major Hollywood studios and equipment manufacturers, and its readership includes hundreds of thousands of DVD consumers from around the world.

Hunt, Bill; Todd Doogan (2003). The Digital Bits Insider's Guide to DVD. McGraw-Hill Professional. ISBN 978-0-07-141852-2.

The material on this site may not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached or otherwise used except with the prior written permission of The Digital Bits, Inc. All logos, images, names and trademarks are the property of the respective trademark owners.

Today on The Bits – Sony sets Quentin Tarantino’s Once Upon a Time

Today on The Bits – Sony sets Quentin Tarantino’s Once Upon a Time. English (UK) · Русский · Українська · Suomi · Español.

Roger Ebert referred to it as "shabby" while Bill Hunt and Todd Doogan, the authors of The Digital Bits Insider's Guide to DVD, referred to the VHS version as "horrible" and with "crappy subtitles". The Criterion Collection released a DVD version of the film on 24 April 2001

Roger Ebert referred to it as "shabby" while Bill Hunt and Todd Doogan, the authors of The Digital Bits Insider's Guide to DVD, referred to the VHS version as "horrible" and with "crappy subtitles". The Criterion Collection released a DVD version of the film on 24 April 2001. In the United Kingdom, Rififi was. released on DVD by Arrow Films on 21 April 2003, and on Region B Blu-ray by the same publisher on 9 May 2011. The film was released to Blu-Ray in Region 1 by Criterion on 14 January 2014.

The Digital Bits Insider's Guide to DVD (McGraw-Hill Professional), p. 11.

Provides a DVD collection with the help website: The Digital Bits. This title is organized by genre: action, classics, chick flicks, music, and more. It features the DVD technology such as: D-VHS, HD-DVD, and more.
  • Anyone who is a regular visitor to TheDigitalBits.com knows the lengths the site staff goes to in bringing you comprehensive and detail information about disc releases, DVD technical details, and industry inside info. This book is a collection of some general info that DVD fans will appreciate and casual non-techie movie watchers can benefit from.

    As with any book of this nature, portions of it will become outdated or obsolete in time. But in the case of the book's extensive section on the then-upcoming 2003 DVD release of the nine-disc "Alien Quadrilogy", it offers another look at not only how much time, love, and care can go into a DVD box set but also a guide for purchasers of the 2010 "Alien Anthology" Blu-ray set so they can get some perspective on how much additional material is now available to them that the DVD set didn't have (and the DVD set had TONS of stuff).

    My favorite section of the book is the chapter detailing their top 100 "must own" DVDs. It isn't necessarily a list of their 100 favorite movies, but it is a fair and balanced look at DVD releases based on audio/video quality, availability and relevance of bonus features, ease of use, and historical or genre significance.

    Highly recommended book for people new to the technical jargon of movies and DVDs ("anamorphic" vs "non-anamorphic" presentations, disc authoring, what "MPEG" means and why, etc) and for film fans who want to see what kind of treatment some of their favorite films have been given for home video release.

  • As a longtime reader of The Digital Bits website, I was more than happy to shell out the money to support their site by purchasing a copy of the book. Little did I suspect that I'd actually get as much as I have out of this book as I have!
    This is an in-depth, detailed look at DVD from start to finish.
    Even the very technical details are explained in such a way as to make them accessible to the non-technical crowd. I have read many descriptions and explanations of "anamorphic" video before (in fact, The Digital Bits has had an online guide for a number of years) but seeing it in the book and with the accompanying text I finally got some aspects (pun intended) of the technology I had not fully grasped on previous occasions. The section on the Alien Quadrilogy was an interesting look at the process of making a special edition DVD set, and even if I wasn't salivating about the set's release, I think the information on what really goes on behind the scenes of putting together such a set is really fascinating.
    The reviews section, while nice, is nothing special. There are multiple places on the web (including The Digital Bits) where one can read this kind of review. While I liked it, it was not stellar, though information on DVD's that are out of print is still worth it to me, as that information is not quite as readily available.
    Last but not least, the book covers the future of DVD, and this is an overview of the current and possible future technologies. Nice to read, but not going to win any prizes.
    For my money, the first several sections are worth their weight in gold - the section on aspect rations and anamorphic video, the technical explanation of DVD layers, etc.

  • The authors did a great job of laying out all the technical info on how DVDs work and are produced in an informative yet entertaining way. Here are some of the ares covered:
    - The evolution of the format
    - How DVD works
    - What aspect ratios are and why they're important
    - Explains the different sound formats on DVD
    - Explanation of Region Codes
    The great thing about this information is it's either in the past or standard to DVD so it's not likely to change. This will be useful info through the life of the DVD format.
    Next on the list is a discussion on setting up a home theater. Everything is covered from recievers, speakers, DVD player, TV even the cables you'll need and best style of room. They're honest in how much this is going to cost and separate the guidelines into four price ranges. It helps to keep the book current in passing years by not talking about specific brands, but features that are important.
    As a way of describing the process of how a DVD special edition is created, the book then goes into an in-depth interview with the creator of the ALIENS QUADRILOGY set due later this year. It's a fascinating look at the hard work and amount of time invloved in creating a truly comprehensive set. Some might find it a bit distasteful that this section is all about a specific DVD, but in focusing on one you get a full picture of the process.
    After all this great information we get the least helpful (and by far the largest) section of the book - DVD reviews. They offer things like the best DVD sets ever, best sci-fi movies on DVD, best dramas on DVD etc. All this information though in-depth can be found on their web site and many others for free. I read 4 or 5 of these and skipped the entire section.
    The book redeems itself near the end when it discusses teh future of DVD. Namely HD DVD, recordable DVD and high resolution audio. This section helps you get a handle on the near future of the format, but is also the sectin with the thinnest information since they of course can not predict the future.
    I'd reccomend this book to those interested in creating a home theatre and those interested in learning a bit of the technical side of the DVD format. The book is most hurt by the lenghty DVD reviews that add little to the books value but much to it's length.