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ePub Getting Started with MakerBot: A Hands-On Introduction to Affordable 3D Printing download

by Jay Shergill,Bre Pettis

ePub Getting Started with MakerBot: A Hands-On Introduction to Affordable 3D Printing download
Author:
Jay Shergill,Bre Pettis
ISBN13:
978-1449338657
ISBN:
1449338658
Language:
Publisher:
Maker Media, Inc; 1 edition (January 6, 2013)
Category:
Subcategory:
Engineering
ePub file:
1600 kb
Fb2 file:
1874 kb
Other formats:
lrf azw docx mobi
Rating:
4.3
Votes:
124

This hands-on book shows you how to make a wide variety of physical objects with the amazing MakerBot 3D printer. She is also the co-author of Getting Started with MakerBot and she compiled the Make: 3D Printing book

This hands-on book shows you how to make a wide variety of physical objects with the amazing MakerBot 3D printer. It’s handy when you need a replacement for something lost. She is also the co-author of Getting Started with MakerBot and she compiled the Make: 3D Printing book. She loves Providence, Rhode Island and is in the process of scanning and printing it. Jay Shergill (MakerBlock) is a blogger, maker, and tinkerer who explores 3D printing and design.

Getting Started with Makerbot book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read

Getting Started with Makerbot book. Ready to join the personal fabrication movement? This. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Getting Started with Makerbot: A Hands-On Introduction to Affordable 3D Printing as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

This hands-on book shows you how to make a wide variety of physical objects with the amazing MakerBot 3D printer. It’s handy when you need a replacement for something lost, broken, or no longer made-like a knob on your stove.

Bre Pettis, Anna Kaziunas France, Jay Shergill. This book shows you how the MakerBot open source 3D printer democratizes manufacturing and brings the power of large factories right to your desktop. Not only will you learn how to operate MakerBot, you'll also get guidelines on how to design and print your own prototypes.

The basics on a Speed square - Продолжительность: 9:06 Classic Work Recommended for yo. DIY How to build a French Drain.

The basics on a Speed square - Продолжительность: 9:06 Classic Work Recommended for you. 9:06. Animals Being Jerks - Продолжительность: 20:28 Little Maple Man Recommended for you. 20:28. How to drain surface water in your yard or property. Продолжительность: 15:00 Pageboy25 Recommended for you. 15:00. Bre Pettis is a founder of Makerbot, a company that produces robots that make things. Bre is also a founder of NYCResistor, a hacker collective in Brooklyn. It's handy when you need a replacement for something lost, broken, or no longer made like a knob on your stove. He is a TV host and Video Podcast producer, hosted Make: Magazine's Weekend Projects podcast, and has been a schoolteacher, artist, and puppeteer.

This hands-on book shows you how to make a wide variety of physical objects with the amazing MakerBot 3D printer

If you want NextDay, we can save the other items for later. Yes-Save my other items for later. This hands-on book shows you how to make a wide variety of physical objects with the amazing MakerBot 3D printer. It's handy when you need a replacement for something lost, broken, or no longer made-like a knob on your stove.

A Hands-On Introduction to Affordable 3D Printing. By: Bre Pettis; Anna Kaziunas France; Jay Shergill.

The print version of this textbook is ISBN: 9781449338657, 1449338658. A Hands-On Introduction to Affordable 3D Printing. Publisher: Maker Media, Inc. Print ISBN: 9781449338657, 1449338658. eText ISBN: 9781449338619, 1449338615.

Ready to join the personal fabrication movement? This hands-on book shows you how to make a wide variety of physical obj.

Getting Started with MakerBot: A Hands-On Introduction to Affordable 3D Printing

Getting Started with MakerBot: A Hands-On Introduction to Affordable 3D Printing. by Bre Pettis, Anna Kaziunas France, and Jay Shergill. Ready to join the personal fabrication movement? This hands-on book shows you how to make a wide variety of physical objects with the amazing MakerBot 3D printer.

Ready to join the personal fabrication movement? This hands-on book shows you how to make a wide variety of physical objects with the amazing MakerBot 3D printer.

It’s handy when you need a replacement for something lost, broken, or no longer made—like a knob on your stove. You can make things instead of buying them, or solve problems with inventions of your own. The possibilities are endless, and MakerBot is the fun, affordable, and inspiring way to go. Get started with your own little factory today!

Set up your MakerBot Replicator 2 and understand how it worksLearn the basics and print 10 useful objects right awayMake objects with sturdy yet biodegradable PLAGet examples of real-world problem solving, from ceiling hooks to hermit crab shellsChoose from thousands of free designs on Thingiverse.com—and share your ownRepurpose disposable products by making them part of your designDesign your own 3D objects, using SketchUp, Autodesk 123D, OpenSCAD, and other toolsUse 3D scanning technology to replicate real objects around you
  • When I got this book, I was already half sold on buying a MakerBot Replicator 2 or 2X. This book didn't help that at all. Full of typos (shame on O'Reilly and the people credited with their guidance of the authors), and it spent a lot of time telling you all the ways you can do silly things with a device costing from $2799 to over $3000. The authors speak as if you can change the world, I've ordered the 2X, and am already setting up things to print. It should be the middle of September before I see mine. The one thing they forget to tell you is that if you order one from the manufacturer, you are funding their building it, not buying it off the shelf. Amazon doesn't sell my model. They had it listed for a few minutes, and then it disappeared. Probably because they realized the company couldn't deliver in days, but in months.

  • I would have liked a little bit more history on the founders of Makerbot and of
    the RepRap project. That is simply glossed over. I did not like that they are
    using Makerbot as a verb. i.e. you can Makerbot this and Makerbot that. But
    still it is a Makerbot book. I would have prefered them to use the word
    "print". The preface is alot of thanking and praising by the three authors. It
    goes into a brief explanation of 3D printing, why they started Makerbot and why
    you might want to 3D print things and how you could do it using a Makerbot.
    Discussed were the different parts of the Replicator 2, unboxing and setting up
    the machine, downloading from Thingiverse, STLs, GCode and Makerware. It also
    explained some of the settings in Makerware, care and maintenance. These pages
    are really just a setup guide for the Replicator 2. It goes over things you
    might want to do prior to getting a Makerbot. It builds excitement, sort of
    like those old RadioShack electronic books I used to read as a kid. Basically
    it says you are getting a factory that can make anything so think about the
    things you want to make while you are waiting for it to arrive. It goes on to
    list things that you might be interested in, such as replacement parts, gifts,
    products etc within the design constraints of the machine. It talks about how
    this machine is so much better than the previous ones the made. It is bigger,
    more precise and faster. Since this book is Replicator 2 centric it mentions
    how much faster it is than the Replicator 1 and goes on to talk about how huge
    the build platform is and how you can build really large things and also how
    precise it is. The numbers cited for the Replicator 2 seem to be mostly
    theoretical limits. The book goes on to briefly discuss the Makerbot
    Community such as the Makerbot Operators Google group, Makerbot User Groups
    etc. The book talked about some of their exploits such as the Museum scans on
    Thingiverse and some other community projects. Further reading mentions the
    software you might want to get familiar with such as web based software and
    openscad and placement of the machine. There are many commentaries by actual
    users that have been taken from interviews, blogs and Thingiverse posts. The
    book then goes on to discuss ABS and PLA, and safety issues and how much better
    the Replicator 2 is over the Replicator 1 now that it has a steel frame. In my
    opinion the book gets much better after page 74. It covers some nice things to
    print from Thingiverse to get you started. It then proceeds to discuss how to
    design your own printable objects and considerations for the design to make it
    print well. Overhangs, water tightness, warping, friction fit and moving
    parts, surface finishing and making large objects by gluing things together.
    Further reading starts going into detail about modeling software such as 3DTin.
    The book continues with 123D Catch,ReconstructMe and then fixing up scans. It
    mentions netfabb, Meshmixer. Meshlab and Pleasand3D and then describes the
    process of fixing the scans. The book then continues with coverage of
    Thingiverse on page 175. The appendix begins on 187 and contains some nice
    references and details on using OpenScad and exporting files to STL.Although
    this is a Makerbot Replicator 2 book through page 75, there is still plenty of
    information here that would be of use to most people, even me. Although short,
    it touches upon most of the things you need to know about 3D printing for these
    machines.

  • Good primer....has a little history and then brings you up to the current consumer for setting up and using the Makerbot 2 and 2X....has online examples and downloadable links. If you have any other printer or think this is a in depth 'history of..' then this is not a book for you.

  • The book is really too general to be be helpful - if you are already seriously considering a Makerbot, all of the information is readily available online. The model Replicator it describes has also already been replaced by the newer (and much more problematic) 5th generation.

  • The useful thing about this book is that it's specific to MakerBot. There's such a steep learning curve and a wide range of 3D printers, modeling software and whatnot that having a reference that focuses on the specific printer I just bought is most useful -- even if the book is now three years old.

  • Its the same information as the book that comes with the Makerbot printer Has a section on 3D scanning I didn't need that plus history I didn't need that. Just stick with the book that comes with the printer

  • WOW! I had bought a copy when we visited the MakerBot store in NY, but wanted one on my Kindle for reference. This has sooooo much information that's relevant, and gives so many helpful hints that I've already used. A MUST for anyone interested in 3D printing.

  • If you are unfamiliar with 3D printing and are thinking of buying this one, its a good starter. It's specific for this machine only. Basically it expands the manual and some of the available data/help you will find on the support site. For the price might as well get it.