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ePub Captain Bligh Mr. Christian: The Men and the Mutiny download

by Richard Alexander Hough

ePub Captain Bligh  Mr. Christian: The Men and the Mutiny download
Author:
Richard Alexander Hough
ISBN13:
978-0525073109
ISBN:
0525073108
Language:
Publisher:
E. P. Dutton; 1st edition (1973)
Category:
Subcategory:
Transportation
ePub file:
1554 kb
Fb2 file:
1433 kb
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Rating:
4.3
Votes:
332

Captain Bligh and M. hristian: The Men and the Mutiny. Hough's 'theory' amounts to libel as unsupported 'fact'. I see no reason to go deeper than a glimpse of the daily routine aboard a sea-going sailing ship to find all sorts of reasons why a mutiny could develop.

Captain Bligh and M. Mutiny on the Bounty: A Novel. I doubt that there are more than a few people in a thousand nowadays who could tolerate the conditions in the Royal Navy of the 1780's, much less do so for years at a time. Any one of us now would reach the breaking point long before month 17.

Richard Alexander Hough was a British author and historian specializing in naval history. As a child, he was obsessed with making model warships and collecting information about navies around the world. In 1941, he joined the Royal Air Force and trained at a flying school near Los Angeles. He flew Hurricanes and Typhoons and was wounded in action. After World War II, Hough worked as a part-time de Richard Alexander Hough was a British author and historian specializing in naval history

The Men and the Mutiny, by R Hough, and Pitcairn. If this lengthy effort by Richard Hough had never been written there would be no loss

The Men and the Mutiny, by R Hough, and Pitcairn. Children of Mutiny, by I Ball, revd by A Villiers. If this lengthy effort by Richard Hough had never been written there would be no loss. The story lurches about the Pacific like the maligned little Bounty trying to weather the Horn while the writer libels the un fortunate Bligh and tries his best to scatter nautical lingo through his text. He is careful, but in that business there is no substitute for knowledge. Only Admiral Samuel Eliot Morison passes that test, and he is a sailor. You don't loosen sail: you loose it, throw the gaskets off. The Bounty was a ship, not a brig, which has only two masts.

Richard Alexander Hough (pronounced how; 15 May 1922 – 7 October 1999) was a British author and . Hough won the Daily Express Best Book of the Sea Award in 1972. Captain Bligh and Mr. Christian (1972). The Deadly Freeze (1976).

Richard Alexander Hough (pronounced how; 15 May 1922 – 7 October 1999) was a British author and historian specializing in maritime history. 3 Bibliography as Richard Hough. After leaving school, he joined the Royal Air Force at the beginning of World War II and received his initial flight training at an airfield not far from Hollywood. He later flew Hurricanes and Typhoons. He also wrote under the nom de plume Bruce Carter.

The mutiny on the Bounty has fascinated readers for more than two hundred years, but no. .Captain Bligh's remarkable 3,600-mile voyage to Timor in the ship's open launch is fully described as one of the great feats of navigation.

Captain Bligh's remarkable 3,600-mile voyage to Timor in the ship's open launch is fully described as one of the great feats of navigation OZON. ru 710. Похожие книги

Hardcover with dust jacket.

Hardcover with dust jacket. Hardcover with dust jacket.

Richard Alexander Hough. This was not the end of what was the most serious threat to his authority that Bligh had so far. Стр. 156 I hope you won't insist on it,' Hayward begged. Hallett echoed Hayward's plea. I hope not, si. Christian did not reply. Nor did he look at them. Matthew Thompson, a thin, dark.

Hough's book is an excellent reexamination of the story and of the complex relationship between William Bligh and Fletcher Christian.

He has set down all the aspects of the extraordinary story in a manner that is utterly compelling, and he has brought alive the powerful characters who played out the events.

Captain Bligh & Mr. Christian. the men and the mutiny. by Richard Alexander Hough. Published 1972 by Hutchinson in London.

The mutiny on the Bounty has fascinated readers for more than two hundred years, but no other book on this extraordinary episode in maritime history tells the story as well as this masterly and thrilling account by Richard Hough. He has set down all the aspects of the extraordinary story in a manner that is utterly compelling, and he has brought alive the powerful characters who played out the events. Highly touted when first published in 1972, it is an epic drama of courage, discovery, deceit, and treachery. The story of Fletcher Christian and the rest of the mutineers' discovery of an uninhabited island and their attempt to fashion a community away from the pursuing ships of the Royal Navy is as tense as it is horrific. Captain Bligh's remarkable 3,600-mile voyage to Timor in the ship's open launch is fully described as one of the great feats of navigation. The dismal episode of the Pandora and the remarkable survival of one of the mutineers add further fascinating twists to the story.
  • The story of the Bounty is fascinating from many directions. One, the overall purpose of the voyage being to support the profiteering of English slave owners; the privations endured as a matter of course in the days of sail; the encounters between Europeans and non-Europeans and the way Europeans enslaved and took possession of foreign lands as a birthright; the drama of tensions building to the breaking point with the resultant mutiny and flight of the forevermore-damned mutineers; the longest open-boat ocean voyage ever up to that time; the mutineers attempt to build, and failure to sustain, a micro-colony for 28 years on an uninhabited island. All of these things make a story which is vastly compelling and able to stand alone to hold our interest without embellishment. That then begs the question why the author is intent upon sharing his own unsubstantiated theories of personal relationships, mainly between Bligh and Christian, to the detriment of the work in general.

    The fact that undocumented dialog appears throughout certainly makes for a good read, but must place this book in the category of historical fiction. That is all well and good and I need to enjoy what I read, and this was very enjoyable. But the depth of the history is in question. Certainly I have no need to delve into the question of Captain Bligh's relationship homosexual or not with anybody. If there are any Bligh descendents now living, highly unhelpful. Hough's 'theory' amounts to libel as unsupported 'fact'. I see no reason to go deeper than a glimpse of the daily routine aboard a sea-going sailing ship to find all sorts of reasons why a mutiny could develop.

    I doubt that there are more than a few people in a thousand nowadays who could tolerate the conditions in the Royal Navy of the 1780's, much less do so for years at a time. Any one of us now would reach the breaking point long before month 17. I find it no wonder that mutiny occurred – the story is worth knowing about, without added psychologizing, and I recommend this book, but with a grain of salt.

  • I learned much that I had not learned from films and other books, so this book is worth a read. However, the author does not define some nautical terms and under-explains some aspects of seafaring even as he over-explains some aspects of human relations.

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  • This is an entertaining if odd little book and is much overated. I had two problems with it: 1) There are no footnotes but all sorts of two-hundred year old dialogue provided. The author has verbatim discussions taking place on the remote island that certainly could not have been recorded (but how would we know since none of it is footnoted?). Mostly, the author made it up it seems and the device shadows the credibility of the whole book. 2) And if I was not incredulous enough over the history-as-soap opera style, the author saves his blockbuster thesis for the last chapter. He agues that the crusty Captain Bligh and Spencer Christian were really gay lovers and this explains the combustibility and passions that came into play. Bligh according to this view was jealous of Christian's love affair with the Tahitian girl he later fathered three children with. The author offers not one shred of evidence for this, not one shred, and says as much in the final pages of the book. This book has an amateurish feel, written by an author who got away for too long with writing pseudo-histories. This book is not without redeeming qualities; it certainly is interesting and a good read. The 1984 movie The Bounty was based on this account, though the movie, mercifully, skipped over some of Robert Blough's more nutty conclusions.

  • The Bounty mutiny is perhaps the most fascinating and stirring sea adventure in world history, even more so than the TITANIC. Hough's book is an excellent reexamination of the story and of the complex relationship between William Bligh and Fletcher Christian. While I don't agree with Hough's conclusions as to what was really at the heart of the mutiny (I won't spoil it for you by revealing that here) the relationship was combustible and was at the heart of the mutiny.
    The Bounty crew were for the most part hand-picked and young. Christian was only in his early 20s, Bligh was in his early 30s and only a very few of the crew were in their late 30s or early 40s. Despite the popular image of the story, Bligh was actually pretty lenient with his crew when it came to punishment and he made it all the way to Tahiti losing only a single man. During his epic open boat voyage after the mutiny, he made it to Coupang having lost only one man en route, although many of the survivors died within weeks of their rescue. Bligh was a complainer, a nagger and had a viciously sharp tongue though which was more than the youthful Christian could bear.
    Far from the heroic image that Christian is given in the movies, Hough shows that Christian was impulsive and not much of a leader. While Bligh, sharp tongue and all, was able to save nearly all of the men who were kicked off the ship with him, Christian and his men met with disaster at almost every turn, primarily because Christian was a failure as a leader. The mutineers' disastrous attempt to settle on Pitcairn Island is perhaps the most gripping and fascinating part of the story.
    Hough's book is excellent and the Mel Gibson/Anthony Hopkins movie "The Bounty" was based on it and is by far the most authentic and best of the Bounty movies.