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ePub Until the Sea Shall Free Them: Life, Death, and Survival in the Merchant Marine (Bluejacket Books) download

by Robert Frump

ePub Until the Sea Shall Free Them: Life, Death, and Survival in the Merchant Marine (Bluejacket Books) download
Author:
Robert Frump
ISBN13:
978-1591142843
ISBN:
1591142849
Language:
Publisher:
Naval Institute Press; Reprint edition (April 15, 2012)
Category:
Subcategory:
Transportation
ePub file:
1942 kb
Fb2 file:
1768 kb
Other formats:
lrf lrf mbr docx
Rating:
4.5
Votes:
475

US Coast Guard 2011 Commandant's Reading List. Robert Frump is a master storyteller and the book was hard to put down.

US Coast Guard 2011 Commandant's Reading List. Until the Sea Shall Free Them recounts in compelling detail the wreck of the Marine Electric and the legal drama that unfolded in its wake-a lawsuit that led to vital reforms in the laws regarding the safety of ships. VADM Brice-O'Hara's choice). It is still early in the investigation of the El Faro but so far it appears that the problems with owners who send old ships to sea and Coast Guard and American Bureau of Shipping inspectors who allow them to continue to operate have not changed over the last 30 years.

Read this book if you are interested in the history of US maritime disasters and the seaman who gave their lives. Very well written book. I knew very little about the Merchant Marine. Now I’ve caught the bug and I’m looking for other books about that subject. 3 people found this helpful.

I found Robert Frump’s Until the Sea Shall Free Them

I found Robert Frump’s Until the Sea Shall Free Them. Unlike the El Faro, the Marine Electric was a coal carrier plying the coastal trade. She was not a fancy modern vessel, but a converted World War II-era Liberty Ship. Frump’s book came out in 2001, and certainly got lost in the shadow of Sebastian Junger’s bestselling The Perfect Storm, published in 1997 and turned into a Wahlberg-Clooney blockbuster in 2000. I’m here to tell you he needn’t have bothered. This book stands on its own as one of the best sea stories I’ve ever read.

Cusick chose to blow the whistle. Frump also brings to life Cusick's internal struggle. Until the Sea Shall Free Them re-creates in compelling detail the wreck of the Marine Electric and the legal drama that unfolded in its wake. With breathtaking immediacy, Robert Frump, who covered the story for the Philadelphia Inquirer, describes the desperate battle waged by the crew against the forces of nature. He knew what happened to those who spoke out against the system, knew that he too might be stripped of his license and prosecuted for "losing his ship," yet he forged ahead

Life, Death and Survival in the Merchant Marine. Books related to Until the Sea Shall Free Them.

Life, Death and Survival in the Merchant Marine. Like many other ships used by the Merchant Marine, the Marine Transport Line's Marine Electric was very old and made of dirty steel (steel with excess sulfur content). Many of these vessels were in terrible condition and broke down frequently. Yet the government persistently turned a blind eye to the potential dangers, convinced that the economic return on keeping these ships was worth the risk. Cusick chose to blow the whistle.

According to Hinduism and Jainism, we can experience the effects of our karma in subsequent lives because there is a self which survives death and bears its karma into the next life. Throughout our discussion we have referred or alluded to the existence of a persistent self and in chapter 4 we considered it as touching on the question of human free agency. It is now time to focus on this crucial.

Life, Death, and Survival in the Merchant Marine . Conditions were so rough that 31 of the 34 officers and crew died in the frigid water before help arrived. Until the Sea Shall Free Them describes in compelling detail the wreck of the Marine Electric and the legal drama that unfolded in its wake. In a bitter lawsuit with owners of the ship, Cusick emerged victorious. His expose of government inaction led to vital reforms in the laws regarding the safety of ships, and his courageous stand places his among the unsung heroes of our time. Robert Frump, a former maritime writer and investigative reporter for the Philadelphia Inquirer, won the George Polk Award for National Reporting for his stories on the Marine Electric disaster. He lives in Summit, New Jersey. Country of Publication. In 1983 the Marine Electric, a reconditioned World War II vessel, was on a routine voyage thirty miles off the East Coast of the United States when disaster struck

Life, Death and Survival in the Merchant Marine. In 1983 the Marine Electric, a reconditioned World War II vessel, was on a routine voyage thirty miles off the East Coast of the United States when disaster struck. As the old coal carrier sank, chief mate Bob Cusick watched his crew–his friends and colleagues–succumb to the frigid forty-foot waves and subzero winds of the Atlantic. Of the thirty-four men aboard, Cusick was one of only three to survive.

In 1983 the Marine Electric, a "reconditioned" World War II vessel, was on a routine voyage thirty miles off the East Coast of the United States when disaster struck: The old coal carrier sank in the frigid forty-foot waves and subzero winds of the Atlantic, and of the thirty-four men aboard, only three survived. Until the Sea Shall Free Them recounts in compelling detail the wreck of the Marine Electric and the legal drama that unfolded in its wake--a lawsuit that led to vital reforms in the laws regarding the safety of ships.
  • I worked on this ship at Jacksonville Shipyards in 1981, the last time it was dry docked. I was a young welder and the repairs we made didn't make sense. We were instructed to replace portions of beams in the ballast holds when the entire beam was rusted out and needed to be replaced. I remember hitting a cargo bulkhead with a hammer and about 5 lbs of rust scales would fall off. The deck was so thin there were holes in it and I worried that I might fall through. I knew I wouldn't go out in the St. Johns River on that rust bucket and I couldn't believe anyone in their right mind would take it out in big water.
    Thank you Robert for telling the story.

  • Let me preface this review by stating that I was an engineering officer on the Marine Electric during one of those trips to Israel that the author mentions early in the book, and I worked on a number of ships owned or operated by Marine Transport Lines. I knew many of the officers and crew on the ship, the MTL shoreside staff, as well as the people mentioned from the engineer's union.

    This is a wonderful book and a great read, telling quite a bit about what went on, especially with the USCG investigative board. I'd have given it a five star review except for some minor errors of fact, mostly with misspelling of names, something I'd think an author would nail down correctly prior to going to print. Those errors do not detract from the overall narrative and importance of how this tragedy left a legacy for today's U.S.-flag merchant marine.

  • I bought this book after the El Faro sinking as it was recommended by a friend who said it traced the investigations of a number of merchant marine losses over the years. Robert Frump is a master storyteller and the book was hard to put down. It is still early in the investigation of the El Faro but so far it appears that the problems with owners who send old ships to sea and Coast Guard and American Bureau of Shipping inspectors who allow them to continue to operate have not changed over the last 30 years. Read this book if you are interested in the history of US maritime disasters and the seaman who gave their lives.

  • A thrilling amount of the final hours of the merchant vessel Marine Electric. The author goes into great detail showing the lives of the men involved and points out the many mistakes that led to this tragedy. Well written and informative. A must read for all current and former merchant mariners.

  • This is not just the story of a tragic ship sinking, it's also the story of why your current organization is so fouled up. Ever wonder why your boss, your company, or even your government fails so often? People are incompetent. This book helped me come to grips with my past employer. Yes, my leaders ignored many safety protocols but at least they didn't get me killed.....so far! Reading this book will help you understand people.

  • I learned about the maritime trade, and the pitfalls of the economy that surrounded it. I learned about the back slapping way the agencies, companies, and the coast guard allowed so many things to be ignored. This book was well researched.
    The main rescue part of the story was small, there were a lot of rabbit trails so to speak and sometimes it was difficult to follow the timeline as the author expounded on a different point. It was interesting and worthwhile.
    However, it had FAR TOO MANY CURSE WORDS. I wish there was a way to block those out.

  • I have no idea how I can sum up this story. To say it lead me through tears, laughter, anger, joy and fury would be an understatement.

    My level of respect for the Coast Guard, mariners, investigative reporters (ones who want the truth, not dirt) and for the families who lost their husbands, sons, uncles, and brothers has grown exponentially.

    Read this book and know that you have a purpose, no matter your life's circumstances.

  • Very well written book. I knew very little about the Merchant Marine. Now I’ve caught the bug and I’m looking for other books about that subject.