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ePub Gatherer of Clouds (The Initiate Brother, Book 2) download

by Sean Russell

ePub Gatherer of Clouds (The Initiate Brother, Book 2) download
Author:
Sean Russell
ISBN13:
978-0886775360
ISBN:
0886775361
Language:
Publisher:
DAW; Reissue edition (November 1, 1992)
Category:
Subcategory:
Fantasy
ePub file:
1872 kb
Fb2 file:
1541 kb
Other formats:
txt docx rtf mobi
Rating:
4.5
Votes:
936

As the plum blossom winds herald spring in the Empire of Wa, Initiate Brother Shuyun, spiritual advisor to Lord . Praise for Sean Russell: This is perfectly plotted, beautifully written fantasy. Publishers Weekly on The One Kingdom.

As the plum blossom winds herald spring in the Empire of Wa, Initiate Brother Shuyun, spiritual advisor to Lord Shonto, the military governor of the northernmost province of Seh, receives a shocking message from the barbarian lands. Forced to retreat south, Lord Shonto is caught between the pursuing barbarian hordes and his own hostile emperor's Imperial Army. Meanwhile, the beautiful young Lady Nishima again becomes involved in court intrigue as well as in a dangerous romantic liaison.

Gatherer of Clouds book. If you enjoy character-centered epic fantasy with lots of political intrigue, Sean Russell’s The Initiate Brother is a great choice. The magnificent concluding volume of The Initiate Brother. I listened to Blackstone Audio’s version and can recommend this format. This was my first experience with Sean Russell’s writing, but I’ll definitely be exploring more of his work in the future.

Book Information: Genre: Fantasy Author: Sean Russell Name: Gatherer of Clouds Series: Book. Gatherer of Clouds BY Sean Russell

Book Information: Genre: Fantasy Author: Sean Russell Name: Gatherer of Clouds Series: Book. two of a Duology . Gatherer of Clouds BY Sean Russell. The near empty avenues succumbed to the NaganaтАЩs invasion as it wound its way among the uninhabited residences, wrenching at shutters and filling the streets with the echoes of the cityтАЩs former lifeтАФbefore the plague had swept the north.

Gatherer of Clouds is the sequel to Sean Russell's The Initiate Brother, a story which is not so much about the Initiate Brother Shuyun, spiritual advisor to Lord Shonto, as it is about the entire Shonto household - a household that is seen as a threat by an insecure emperor. And with good reason, for Lord Shonto is an honorable, intelligent, and insightful man who has raised his children to be his equals and who has surrounded himself with a competent and loyal staff and several clever allies.

Sean Russell wrote these books in collaboration with Ian Dennis under their common pen-name T. F. Banks. Sean Russell at the Internet Speculative Fiction Database. Vol. 1: The Thief Taker, Delacorte Press, 2001, ISBN 0-385-33571-7. 2: The Emperor's Assassin, Dell Books, 2003, ISBN 0-440-24084-0. Sean Russell at Library of Congress Authorities, with 10 catalogue records (includes S. Thomas Russell).

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Поиск книг BookFi BookSee - Download books for free. Sean Russell - The Initiate Brother 2 - Gatherer of Clouds. 828 Kb. Russell, Sean - Initiate Brother 02 - Gatherer of Clouds. 504 Kb. 7 Mb. 6 Mb. Russell, Sean - Initiate Brother 2 - Gatherer Of Clouds. 8 Mb.

Written by Sean Russell, Audiobook narrated by Elijah Alexander. The Initiate Brother Series, Book 2. By: Sean Russell. Narrated by: Elijah Alexander.

0. 0. The Initiate Brother - Gatherer Of Clouds.

A collection of fantasy holiday stories brings together selkies, sea serpents, elves, pixies, a blue-nosed reindeer, and even a transplanted Yeti to celebrate the Christmas and Hanukkah holidays. Original.
  • Gatherer of Clouds was an excellent journey into the soul of the book's characters. It was refreshing to delve into several of the characters in-depth instead of just one or two. A fast read. I wanted to keep reading it to see what the people would learn next - who would fail, and who would succeed, and more specifically, how. Even the poetic nature of the stories were well entwined in the stories themselves. Sean Russell makes me think.

  • Great writing super read

  • finished the story from the first book

  • Wonderful sequel for Initiate Brother. It continued the character development and suspense of Part 1, but also had more pessimism.

  • Gatherer of Clouds is the sequel to Sean Russell's The Initiate Brother, a story which is not so much about the Initiate Brother Shuyun, spiritual advisor to Lord Shonto, as it is about the entire Shonto household -- a household that is seen as a threat by an insecure emperor. And with good reason, for Lord Shonto is an honorable, intelligent, and insightful man who has raised his children to be his equals and who has surrounded himself with a competent and loyal staff and several clever allies.

    As the story opens, Shonto, governor of the northern province of She, is preparing for a massive barbarian invasion that the emperor refuses to believe in (since he only paid for a small invasion in order to get rid of Shonto). Should Shonto stay in the north, as ordered, and be wiped out by the barbarian horde? Or should he let his province fall and retreat toward the capital to raise an army that may have a chance to defeat the invaders? This latter option seems the only way to save the empire of Wa, but the emperor will certainly declare treason if Shonto starts recruiting soldiers. There are hard choices and harder sacrifices to make, not just for Shonto, but for everyone involved.

    While reading Gatherer of Clouds, I was completely immersed in the lives of Lord Shonto, Brother Shuyun, Lady Nishima, Lord Komawara, and the Jaku brothers, as well as the beauty and elegance of their lifestyles. Each of Sean Russell's diverse set of characters is vivid, unique, and realistic, and they all learn much about themselves and each other as the stress ramps up. Because we spend so much time with them, and because they feel so real, their inner struggles become our inner struggles. Would we be willing to sacrifice love for duty? When is it right to disobey (or murder!) a sovereign ruler? Are there times when it is better to kill than to heal? What is true religion and how do we recognize when it has become corrupt? When does loyalty become dishonorable? When principles conflict, how do we know which principle is highest? I found myself considering each of these questions as I read Gatherer of Clouds.

    In addition to making us think about some tough ideas, Russell also shows us how legends are made. Every one of his characters has the potential to become either a hero or a villain, and Russell shows us that it's our daily choices that add up to determine our destiny and how we'll be perceived by history.

    If you enjoy character-centered epic fantasy with lots of political intrigue, Sean Russell's The Initiate Brother is a great choice. I listened to Blackstone Audio's version and can recommend this format. This was my first experience with Sean Russell's writing, but I'll definitely be exploring more of his work in the future.

  • Don't let the older negative reviews of the first book mislead you. It's offbase to criticize a book for not giving away all its plot in the first of a series. I've read both books, in fact pull them out every couple of years to re-read and wish there was a Kindle version.

    The author uses internal thought as exposition. The result is a lightweight version of the first Dune book where the frequent POV shifts tell us more about the character than the overall plotline. These POVs change over time as the characters age, mature, or learn more about events.

    The plot "inspiration" comes from a game called "gii" which is clearly similar to Go or chess. There are constant references of feints and misleading moves that are if anything overly obvious statements the author is making about the plot rather than the game. The sequel takes all the characters in a completely different direction than where they started in the first book.

    The "Initiate Brother" is intentionally kept abstract until the sequel. He is not a "super monk" - his abilities are simply window dressing to frame his role and not used as a crutch to mimic good plot and character development.

    Some reviewers make too much about the setting. It's fantasy. The cultural references say as much about historical China / Japan / Korea as Lord of the Rings say as much about historical Britain / Scandinavia. In short they say nothing at all and serve only as milieu.

    I like the books for exactly the reason I liked Herbert's first Dune book. The series is multi-layered, the characters are dimensional and change over time. What seems like a straitjacket character in the first book is anything but in the sequel.

    It's not high literature just strong use of well-known storytelling elements to make a good read.

  • This two volume story is elegant, moving, and fun. The monk, Shuyun, comes to be spiritual advisor to the Shonto family. From there, we have intrigue with the emperor, a barbarian invasion, complex politics, wild battles, and an elegant fictionalized China, complete with lovely poetry. In this volume, we have a running battle with a huge barbarian army, as the Shonto family is caught between the emperor and the barbarians. The brother Shuyun is caught between his duties and a woman, in a very satisfying love story. Excellent story.

  • The machinations of a faithless emperor expose his subjects to a massive barbarian invasion which must be stopped by the lord Shonto and his household. The monk Shuyun, spiritual advisor to Shonto and title character of both books, struggles with the realization of his own power and identity, and the corruption of those he has been taught to respect.

    There are no fearsome monsters or magical fireworks, and no crisis that will surely end the universe or take all joy out of it forever in this tale. Magic is sparse, enhancing the sense of wonder which we see the characters experience. Mr. Russell adeptly uses the formality and ceremony of high Asian culture as a structure in which to place, like jewels, the feelings and intimate thoughts of the characters. This is a work of power and beauty.