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ePub The Metal Monster (Lovecraft's Library) download

by A. Merritt,Stefan Dziemianowicz

ePub The Metal Monster (Lovecraft's Library) download
Author:
A. Merritt,Stefan Dziemianowicz
ISBN13:
978-0967321516
ISBN:
0967321514
Language:
Publisher:
Hippocampus Pr; 1 edition (May 2002)
Category:
Subcategory:
Fantasy
ePub file:
1227 kb
Fb2 file:
1271 kb
Other formats:
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Rating:
4.5
Votes:
257

The Metal Monster is a fantasy novel by American writer Abraham Merritt. It was first serialized in Argosy All-Story Weekly in 1920 and features the return of Dr. Goodwin who first appeared in The Moon Pool.

The Metal Monster is a fantasy novel by American writer Abraham Merritt.

Items related to The Metal Monster (Lovecraft's Library) . A. Merritt; Stefan Dziemianowicz The Metal Monster (Lovecraft's Library). ISBN 13: 9780967321516. Merritt’s second published novel, The Metal Monster was first serialized in a pulp fiction magazine in 1920. Its exotic setting and extravagant scientific speculations make it a landmark of lost-race fantasy fiction.

The Metal Monster is an Abraham Merritt fantasy novel. The epic adventure starts with a foreword where Merritt is assigned the duty to relay Dr. Walter T. Goodwin's incredible tale of his encounter in the Trans-Himalayan mountains to the world,. Goodwin's incredible tale of his encounter in the Trans-Himalayan mountains to the world, to let everyone know the terrible fate Goodwin's group barely escaped and the possibility of other such monsters out there.

Metal Monster, The. by Merritt. H. P. Lovecraft, letter to James F. Morton, 6 March 1934 Actually, contains the most remarkable presentation of the utterly alien and non-human that I have ever seen.

The Metal Monster (Lovecraft's Library). by A. Merritt, Stefan Dziemianowicz. Coauthors & Alternates. ISBN 9780967321516 (978-673215-1-6) Softcover, Hippocampus Pr, 2002. Find signed collectible books: 'The Metal Monster (Lovecraft's Library)'. Murder Most Scottish.

The Metal Monster book . Later on, Merritt treats us to a titanic battle between the metal folk and the lost Persians, as well as an hallucinatory cataclysm at the novel's end. Indeed, much of the book IS hallucinatory, with the metal shapes coalescing and morphing like crazy Transformers gone wild. A book by A. Merritt would be nothing without his hyperstylized, lush purple prose, and in this tale, his gift for somewhat prolix prose is given full vent. At times these incessant descriptions wear a bit thin, and at others they paradoxically fail to stir up pictures in the reader's mind eye. 2002, US, Hippocampus Press, OCLC 51580003, Pub date 2002, in the Lovecraft's Library series, introduction by Stefan Dziemianowicz

The Metal Monster is a Fantasy novel by American writer Abraham Merritt. 2002, US, Hippocampus Press, OCLC 51580003, Pub date 2002, in the Lovecraft's Library series, introduction by Stefan Dziemianowicz. It was founded in 1967 as the Ohio College Library Center.

1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. Are you sure you want to remove The metal monster from your list? The metal monster. 1st ed. Merritt. Published 2002 by Hippocampus Press in New York.

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Title: The Metal Monster Title Record 5868 Author: A. Merritt Date: 1945-05-00 Type . This is Merritt's preferred text

Title: The Metal Monster Title Record 5868 Author: A. Merritt Date: 1945-05-00 Type: NOVEL Series: Walter Goodwin Series Number: 2 Webpages: librivox. The serial version in "Science and Invention" is at least 20% shorter. This is Merritt's preferred text. Most subsequent book publications are based upon this version.

In the wilds of the Trans-Himalayan region, a quartet of adventurers led by Dr. Walter T. Goodwin stumbles upon a tribe of human primitives forgotten since the age of Alexander the Great, and an awesome being of living metal commanded by the exiled Norhala. As Norhala’s guests, Goodwin and his team witness the mind-boggling marvels that are the Metal Monster’s way of life, and the unspeakable horrors it commits when Norhala takes it to war against her persecutors.A. Merritt’s second published novel, The Metal Monster was first serialized in a pulp fiction magazine in 1920. Its exotic setting and extravagant scientific speculations make it a landmark of lost-race fantasy fiction. Dissatisfied with its writing, Merritt kept his story from book publication until 1946, revising and reshaping it for more than twenty years. This edition reprints for he first time the tale as it was originally published, restoring close to 10,000 words of text Merritt cut from the original. This definitive edition features cover artwork and a frontispiece by famed fantasy artist Virgil Finlay.
  • Abraham Merritt's _The Metal Monster_ (_Argosy_, 1920; 1946) is a sequel of sorts to _The Moon Pool_ (1919). The narrator of the earlier novel returns, and damned if he doesn't end up in another lost world, this time in the Trans- Himalayan mountains. _Monster_ doesn't have quite the color or dazzle of _Pool_, but I believe that it deserves a bit of attention because it is the most _science fictional_ of Merritt's lost world novels. Most of Merritt's novels-- _The Moon Pool_(1919), _The Face in the Abyss_ (1931), _Dwellers in the Mirage_ (1932), _The Ship of Ishtar_ (1949)-- are unabashed fantasies. But the creature in _The Metal Monster_ could be explained in scientific rather than mythical terms.

    The monster in question is a kind of hive-mind: cubes, spheres, pyramids, and tetrahedrons of metal "given volition, movement, cognition-- thinking" (37). These molecules of metal can assemble into bridges, fighting machines, flying cars, X-ray machines, robots, and a mechanical serpent. The human scientists captured by the creature certainly attempt to explain it in scientific terms:

    "If Jaques Loeb is right, that action of iron molecules is every bit as conscious a movement as the least and the greatest of our own... the iron does meet Haeckel's three three tests-- it can receive a stimulus, it does react to a stimulus and it retains memory of it" (108).

    Our heroes admit that the creature's intelligence is a bit harder to explain, but that it nevertheless exists. And it has other characteristics of living organisms: "[The crystals of metal] bud-- give birth, in fact-- to smaller ones, which increase until they reach the size of the preceeding generation" (110-111). There is even a suggestion that the metal monster reached our planet by traveling through space like a cluster of spores. Certainly it has long range plans to wipe out the competitive race of man. The monster of _The Moon Pool_ was defeated largely by old magic. The monster of _The Metal Monster_ has an Achilles heel, but the arrow that slays it is more scientific than magical in nature.

    But the novel is not purely science fictional. There are, almost in tension, barbarion warriors, traitorous eunuchs, and Norhala. Norhala is technically a priestess for the iron Emperor. But in practice, she is a goddess. She is beautiful, with fiery red hair. And I think that it is fair to say that she is neither deceptive nor evil. But she is imperious, powerful, and demanding. She has no real understanding of human feelings or foibles, she expects total obedience, and she is capable of ruthless vengeance. This leads to some bloody fights and spectacular battles.

    Hugo Gernsback reprinted _The Metal Monster_ in 1927 in _Science and Invention_ under the title _The Metal Emperor_. Gernsback being Gernsback, he probably told himself that the value of the story was the "science" in it that would educate American youth, turning them into little technocrats. Most of Gernsback's readers knew better.

    Perhaps a few words should be said about Merritt's attitude toward _The Metal Monster_: He was not happy with it (Moskowitz, 1963). But that dissatisfaction caused him to do several rewrites, and so in some ways it is a little better crafted than several of his other novels.

    Reference: Moskowitz, Sam (1963). "The Marvelous A. Merritt". In _Explorers of the Infinite: Shapers of Science Fiction_. Westport, Conn: Hyperion P, 1963.

  • A. (Abraham) Merritt (1884-1943) is known to experienced readers of fantasy and science fiction for his eight novels of which the "Metal Monster" was his second.

    First published as a serial in a pulp fiction magazine in 1920 author Merritt refused to have it published in book form until 1941. In the introduction to my Hippocampus Press edition the reader is informed that "Merritt was dissatisfied with it's writing and revised and reshaped the story and cut 10,000 words from the text". Undaunted I have read the "restored edition" and I can well appreciate the author's dilemma. After all I was warned, even the author was dissatisfied with the story.

    Dr. Walter T. Goodwin, fresh from his adventures in the South Pacific- see Merritt's "The Moon Pool", travels to the Trans-Himalayan region where he discovers "awesome beings of living metal". The author spends over 200 pages attempting to describe these metal beings that suck energy from the sun. The prose is just mind numbing, for example:
    "Out from the star shapes was hurled the bolts of emerald and of purple! Out from the crosses whirled and linked saffron and scarlet flame! Forth from the disks flew the blasting globes! The crater was threaded with their lightings- the lightings of the Metal Peoples was broidered with them, was a pit woven with vast and changing patters of electric flames!"

    The plot can be summarized in one sentence: Dr. Goodwin and his companions are captured by the Metal People, observe and comments upon inexplicable events and escape to tell their story to the world.

    One very curious aspect of this story takes place at the very beginning. A. Merritt imports himself into the story as a minor character. He is introduced to Dr. Goodwin as a writer who will chronicle the events of the mysterious journey to the Trans-Himalayan region.

    I cannot recommend this book to any but diehard Merritt fans. I found the story uninteresting, difficult to understand and over stuffed with esoteric phrases and description. New readers should instead seek out Merritt's "Dwellers in the Mirage", "The Moon Pool", "Ship of Ishtar" or "Face In the Abyss".