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ePub Way of the Pilgrim download

by Gordon R. Dickson

ePub Way of the Pilgrim download
Author:
Gordon R. Dickson
ISBN13:
978-0312866624
ISBN:
0312866623
Language:
Publisher:
Tor Books; 1st edition (July 2, 1999)
Category:
Subcategory:
Science Fiction
ePub file:
1570 kb
Fb2 file:
1506 kb
Other formats:
mobi txt lit lrf
Rating:
4.7
Votes:
368

Gordon R. Dickson was the Hugo- and Nebula-winning author of many classics of fantasy and science fiction, most . Dickson presents another path in the Way of the Pilgrim

Gordon R. Dickson was the Hugo- and Nebula-winning author of many classics of fantasy and science fiction, most famously the Childe Cycle (also known as the Dorsai series). Dickson presents another path in the Way of the Pilgrim. It is slower and more painful for many, espcially since the invaders view humans with indifference and cannot understand why we dont comply. Ironically the invanders have their own demons to flee from elsewhere.

Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets. Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading Way of the Pilgrim. The oppressive imperialists and rebellious colonists familiar from Dickson's previous work return in this novel of the Earth's conquest by aliens. The nine-foot-tall Aalaag, members of a warrior society, use their advanced technology to treat humans like cattle.

To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

Imagine an Earth totally dominated by an alien race. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

Way of the Pilgrim book. However, I remember it as Gordon R. Dickson's masterwork

Way of the Pilgrim book. Dickson's masterwork. For me, it was what moved him from the 'Author who writes enjoyable fiction like The Dragon and the George' shelf to the 'Author capable of deeply moving works' shelf. The Way of the Pilgrim is a deeply thoughtful book about the human penchant for rebellion and yearning for freedom.

Gordon Rupert Dickson (November 1, 1923 – January 31, 2001) was a Canadian-American science fiction writer. He was inducted into the Science Fiction and Fantasy Hall of Fame in 2000. Dickson was born in Edmonton, Alberta, in 1923

Gordon Rupert Dickson (November 1, 1923 – January 31, 2001) was a Canadian-American science fiction writer. Dickson was born in Edmonton, Alberta, in 1923. After the death of his father, he moved with his mother to Minneapolis, Minnesota, in 1937. He served in the United States Army, from 1943 to 1946, and received a Bachelor of Arts from the University of Minnesota, in 1948

Gordon R. Dickson (1923 - 2001) Gordon Rupert Dickson was born in Alberta, Canada, in 1923 but resided in the United States from the age of thirteen.

Gordon R. Along with Robert A. Heinlein, he is regarded as one of the fathers of military space opera, his Dorsai! sequence being an early exemplar of both military SF and Future History. Dickson was one of the rare breed of authors as well known for his fantasy as his SF - The Dragon and the George, the first novel in his Dragon Knight sequence, was shortlisted for the World Fantasy Award and won the British Fantasy Award

by. Dickson, Gordon R. Publication date. New York : Ace Books.

by. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china.

Books related to Way of the Pilgrim. More by Gordon R Dickson. The Dragon at War. Gordon R Dickson. Dickson Gordon R. Dickson.

After the collapse of civilization, when the social fabric of America has come apart in bloody rags, when every man's hand is raised against another, and only the strong survive.

Way of the Pilgrim is a good example of the value of hard sci-fi. The story has some of the best examples of Gordon Dickson's inspiring vision and writing style contained in a single book - but without the burden of having to wade through all the novels of the Childe Cycle

Way of the Pilgrim is a good example of the value of hard sci-fi. The core of a good hard sci-fi story is built around some insight into how the world really works. The story has some of the best examples of Gordon Dickson's inspiring vision and writing style contained in a single book - but without the burden of having to wade through all the novels of the Childe Cycle. Some parts of the story are slow and political, but the opening chapters, and the Aalaag encounters, and all of the final scenes are inspiring. Shane's third-person narrative is truly Human. We should mourn the recent passing of Gordon Dickson.

Shane, a gifted linguist, has spent his life learning the language of the old and powerful alien race that has conquered Earth. He has learned it so well that the interstellar masters, old hands at enslaving planets, regard him as a valuable servant.But Shane has a secret. One day, in a rebellious moment, he invented The Pilgrim: a mysterious figure who incites rebellion and vanishes unseen, leaving a distinctive icon behind him.Now the human underground is preparing to rebel. Shane knows how hopeless their rebellion will be. He knows, as well, that he will be unable to keep himself from taking part.
  • Dickson writes military fiction in a believable way that brings the reader into the situation where he feels what the protagonist feels and wants him to succeed. Other novels like Pilgrim have the conquered Earth as their subject, with Earth as totally destroyed and humans as material for soup. Dickson's story has the aliens much like us, but looking for partners in their quest to return to their home worlds. If we're worthy, that is. Very imaginative story line, and interesting plot. Good addition to your library.

  • Book came in the condition advertised. I had read this book a long time ago and wished to reread it. The story itself is pretty thought provoking.

  • The humiliation of subjugation by an alien race, the pathos of the oppressed and the tremendous, exhilarating energy of the downtrodden of all countries/races/religions/ages uniting as one to regain their freedom. United in a common goal, the humans persevere. There is cooperation, equality, and mutual respect ( with a bit of romance tossed in for good measure). It's a fun read. The ultimate thought question, though,is posed only in the last chapter of the book. A REAL question, as opposed to a fictional construct, and it is posed in almost an indirect manner....in the aftermath of such a victory, is humanity CAPABLE of maintaining that level of unity ? Or would we crumble back into our "normal" aggressive, contentious, infighting ways. Dickson does not provide an answer. He leaves that to us.

  • Previously I read "Wolf in Iron" by Gordon Dickson, and it is one of the best post-holocaust novels I have ever read. A truly wonderful book, and brilliantly written. I was expecting the same qualities in this book.
    But here is something altoghether different. Perhaps it is because Dickson is trying to tell the story from the viewpoint of the protagonist, Shane Everett. Little Shane Beast is a translator working for the nine foot tall alien occupiers of earth. Cold dispassionate and unemotional beings, Shane must behave like them to survive. And not only does he survive, but he excells. Is this why the whole story is told in such a cold, logical and dispassionate prose?
    The plot is simple and bare, as clean as the cities in the Aalaag occupied world. There are no plot turns, no multiple plots, no side character, no maturing of the hero. Nothing. The tale is simple to the point of starkness. Something that I found to be unsatisfying in the extreme.
    The premise of language as a route to understanding has been done far better in "Fine Prey" by Scott Westerfield. There are many more interesting and uplifting novels about alien invasion of earth.
    What this book does deliver on is the horror of earth being occupied by a race who are so far above us that we cannot reach an understanding of their technology. A race that does demote us to the status of beasts. As top dog on our planet we have a dreadful superiority complex. We imagine that eventually we would get the better of any alien species we encounter. But what if we couldn't. Dickson's Aalaag are so superior to us that a single fully armored warrior would not be in danger should the whole planet rise against him. Humans become as powerless as a hive of bees to him. As long as we produce output we achive the status of being useful. Otherwise we are little more than pests. Perhaps it is this very vision that makes this book so unsettling?

  • A great story, but it aggravates me to pay as much as I did for the Kindle edition only to find it riddled with typographical errors. The story would get four stars, the typos knock it back one.

  • What happens when we, as a species, are overwhelmed by a race whose technology is so advanced you had little hope of fighting back effectively? Many authors have tackled this ( Battle field earth by L. Ron Hubbard, Independence Day, etc.). In most cases it is the Cowboy approach that wins the day. Dickson presents another path in the Way of the Pilgrim. It is slower and more painful for many, espcially since the invaders view humans with indifference and cannot understand why we dont comply. Ironically the invanders have their own demons to flee from elsewhere.
    Nonetheless passive resistance takes hold in the initial form of symbols being scratched on walls, which eventually lead to mass rallies where people understand that they may have to die to prove thier point. Is it naive, not really, it just depends upon the motivations that the invaders have fro coming to our planet.
    This is a powerful book where Dickson challenges your assumptions. Worth savoring.

  • Dickson writes very well indeed, though I didn't pick up any quotes from this book. Its plot is very simple and the ending less than inspiring IMHO. But, there are VERY significant psychological factors (besides the obvious linguistic ones) for both aliens (Aalag) and humans. The protagonist, Shane, starts out as very distant, pessimistic, & self-centered. But, Dickson addresses the Pilgrim within (unconscious) which disallows Shane's passivity & instigates transformations within Shane, in Shane's relationships with others (e.g. Maria, Peter, & the Aalag), & in human--Aalag relations. The key to removing the Aalag from Earth is psychological not technological. Indeed, the Aalag are psychologically wounded; unable to accept losing their homeworlds to the Bee creatures, they stagnated culturally. Yet, they continued to display overweening narcissism (esp. regarding their "cattle")! "My mind is made up, don't bother me with facts." Rather than a foil for humanity, they are a left handed insult to humanity. But the ending is a more direct criticism as people revert to selfishness, pettiness, & disorder--seeming to have learned little from the Aalag either as good or as bad examples of behavior. The ultimate foolishness, however, is the Aalag commander's explanation of their intentions & total misunderstanding of the nature of humans & the nature of freedom--highly reminiscent of human "benevolent" dictators. This book is a sad commentary on humanity (consciousness) in parallel with its inspiring view of the human (unconscious) spirit.