mostraligabue
» » Rabbletown: Life in These United Christian States of Holy America: A precautionary dystopian novel (Volume 1)

ePub Rabbletown: Life in These United Christian States of Holy America: A precautionary dystopian novel (Volume 1) download

by Randy Attwood

ePub Rabbletown: Life in These United Christian States of Holy America: A precautionary dystopian novel (Volume 1) download
Author:
Randy Attwood
ISBN13:
978-1478308591
ISBN:
1478308591
Language:
Publisher:
CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform (July 24, 2012)
Category:
Subcategory:
Science Fiction
ePub file:
1429 kb
Fb2 file:
1578 kb
Other formats:
lrf txt lrf docx
Rating:
4.6
Votes:
869

You're viewing YouTube in Russian. You can change this preference below.

You're viewing YouTube in Russian. Это видео недоступно. Rabbletown Life in These United Christian States of Holy America A precautionary dystopian novel Vol. V. Tudor.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read.

The place is Topeka, Kansas. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Rabbletown: Life in These United Christian States of Holy America as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Attwood Collected Works, Kansas City, Missouri. Information about the fiction works by Randy Attwood. Rabbletown: Life in These United Christian States of Holy America.

Randy said: It's 2084 This topic is about Rabbletown yes, but the novel also offers a road to redemption.

Randy said: It's 2084. The religious right has won. They rule America with a Bible in each fist and the computer in your hovel  . This topic is about Rabbletown. Dystopian Books Rabbletown: Life in These United Christian States of Holy America. It's 2084 yes, but the novel also offers a road to redemption. reply flag . message 3: by Melissa (Asarelah) (new) - added it. Jun 23, 2012 08:32PM.

Dystopias usually extrapolate elements of contemporary society and this .

Dystopias usually extrapolate elements of contemporary society and this can be read as political warnings. The 1921 novel We by Yevgeny Zamyatin predicts a post-apocalyptic future in which society is entirely based on logic and modeled after mechanical systems.

The way is within you. ― Randy Attwood, quote from Rabbletown: Life in. . ― Randy Attwood, quote from Rabbletown: Life in These United Christian States of Holy America. I am Christ as he was. He is not important; his way is important," Bobby answered. Randy Attwood, quote from Rabbletown: Life in These United Christian States of Holy America.

What kind of life would it be if the Religious Right ruled America. This future history set circa 2084 in Topeka, Kansas, shows what happens when ultimate power resides in the hand of the Evangels

What kind of life would it be if the Religious Right ruled America. This future history set circa 2084 in Topeka, Kansas, shows what happens when ultimate power resides in the hand of the Evangels. Potential redemption comes in the form of a boy with an amazing memory for Bible verses. Tell us if something is incorrect. Manufacturers, suppliers and others provide what you see here, and we have not verified it. See our disclaimer. What kind of life would it be if the Religious Right ruled America.

Rabbletown: Life in These United Christian States of Holy America by Randy Attwood. The year is The place is Topeka, Kansas. The Church of the Evangels run the country through the Pastor President, pastor governors and pastor legislators.

The dystopian novel that tells of life in a future totalitarian society dominated by "Big Brother" is George Orwell's award winning 1949 novel "Nineteen Eighty-Four". This work is considered one of his two best along with "Animal Farm". Orwell's dystopian novels are usually set in the future; they warn man to change his attitude about his society. In "Nineteen Eighty-Four", the ruler is known as "Big Brother" and huge photographs of him dominate every public space within the society

The year is 2084. The place is Topeka, Kansas. The Church of the Evangels runs the country through the Pastor President, pastor governors and pastor legislators. They rule with a Bible in each fist and the computer in your hovel. This dystopia presents a view of what life would be like under the control of right wing evangelical Christians. Work on the new state cathedral in Topeka provides the economic stimulus for that region. When religion rules, society enters a new dark ages, but still operating are the computer-based social networking systems the Church of the Evangels use to spy on its members. Abortion is just outlawed, pregnancy is mandated. And if you don't fit into the society of the Church of the Evangels, you try to make a life in Rabbletown. And then the son of a mason reminds everyone what redemption is all about. Oh, and don't miss Friday stonings in Fred Phelps Plaza. Oh, and don't miss Friday stonings in Fred Phelps Plaza.
  • This is one of those books that I got because the synopsis sounded interesting.

    The best way I can describe this book is Dystopian.

    A new world order started after a nuclear event. In this new world order a self-righteous Christian government came into power in what was formerly the United States of America.

    To me the story was eerily plausible but as a believer it made me cringe. As I read the story I could see elements of things that are currently going on but not in the same way as the author portrayed them. Was this to give a sarcastic symbolism or how he truly feels about Christians in general? I am not sure.

    Warning: Even though this has Christian in the title, much of what occurs could be considered un-Christian like behavior. There is sexual situations, violence, and adult language - including using unkind names for races and religions.

  • What would the world look like if a post world war United States was taken over by right wing Christians? Rabbletown is a vision of what might be and it's not a pretty sight. The government is controlled by an autocratic Pastor President. There is no Supreme Court and there are Pastor Governors and Pastor Senators, all with a tight grip on power and control of the State/ Church. It is an Evangelical dystopia. Rabbletown is worth the quick read and should be thought provoking. What happens if we let the current train of events continue to the logical conclusion? What happens if Christian dominionists are allowed to gain a stranglehold on American society? These are just a couple questions raised for me while reading Rabbletown. Read it and meet the evangelical future.

  • “Rabbletown” is a short novel set in what was once Topeka Kansas, seventy some years in the future. Nuclear War has wiped out much of the world. A fundamentalist Protestant Christian theology has taken over what is left of the US.

    The story is full of passionate energy, and is written with the fury an avenging angel.

    “Rabbletown” sets out explaining this new society, starting with the hierarchy of the new leadership class. A kind of hereditary priest class, (or rather Pastor class) is in charge. It is Americana, with Church secretaries who take care of the 'holy stress' of the Pastors, Inquisitors who handle public security, and of course a huge underclass, that is broken, dysfunctional and forced to breed incessantly. Security is handled with torture, stonings and burnings. It is nominally the story of one poor family from the slums, the Crowleys, with Bob, his wife and 13 children, one of whom, Bobby, is holy in a way that doesn't fit into existing Church doctrine. Bob, an abusive drunk, is a master mason, helping to build the great cathedral that is to be the center for the New Christianity.

    As I read the novel I tried to place it as a 'type' of book. Of course I thought of it as a satire of Kansas today, often called Brownbackistan, after the fundamentalist governor who has striped government of the ability to provide basic services, (such as education) and has created a living hell for poor women who find themselves with unwanted pregnancies. I read the book as if it were in the style of WS Burroughs' “Naked Lunch”, or even Vonnegut's “Cat's Cradle” or “Mother Night”. As I continued to read, I saw it in a different light, written with an English like early medieval Latin, a language fallen from the standards of literature of Classical Rome. I imagined the writer as an isolated Frankish Monk, who has access to only a few books, such as Gregory of Tours describing early Merovingian Gaul, trying to tell the story of a society that had fallen very far from where it had once been. But then, toward the end, I saw “Rabbletown” as a new Apocrypha, a book of a new Bible for the coming Dark Age. Perhaps it is all of those. It seems like it was written fast and covers a lot of ground, not wasting time on scene or description beyond the political and social situation. It appears to have been written on the fly, and not edited, with long sentences that lose focus, but that is clearly a stylistic choice, (Attwood is a veteran journalist), to give an added sense of desolation to the story.

    Most of all I see it as a battle cry from Attwood, a lifelong Kansan who is clearly furious with the changes that have overtaken his state. I know a bit about it, because I lived in Lawrence Kansas myself for five years in the late sixties, early seventies as a student and a laboror. So I get most of the satire. He has the heirs of Pat Robertson, Jerry Falwell, and Jerry Johnstone (a Kansas Megachurch preacher) as the leaders of this new Jerusalem. The Catholics are forced into monasteries and nunneries, where they weren't suppose to breed, (but do anyway). The Jews are no longer around, as one would imagine in Germany if the war had ended differently. The descendants of recent Kansas political leaders, such as Brownback and Fritzel (who you wouldn't know if you never lived in Kansas) are also skewered. And of course Fred Phelps, the dead leader of that hideous Topeka Church that preaches hatred is memorialized as a saint.

    It packs a punch. It is unlike most recent novels, and that makes it interesting and a good read.

  • Ironically, I read RABBLETOWN the week between Good Friday and Easter--a period of time that is clearly at the very core of the Christian faith. The book projected the reader into a future world of Evangelical Fundamentalism morphed into a neo-Fascist world government. Perhaps actually a dream scenario for those who adhere to that extreme viewpoint. Yet, clearly a nightmare for the faithful masses. The author retraces an all too familiar tale, yet in a style and context that holds the reader and keeps the pages turning. One is left in the grasp, along with the well-defined characters of this tale . . . of those sanctimonious hypocrites who use religion to gain power, wealth, influence and control over others who believe in them, as a matter of simple "faith". This is a somber and important reminder that faith in your God does not require absolute faith in those who say they speak for God, or God speaks through them. They must be judged by what they do and not what they say. This book is a thoughtful and important reflection on issues that have influenced human society since the beginning. It offers a reminder of lessons that each generation seems destined to learn and re-learn, over and over again . . . before it is too late. Therefore, this engaging book is highly recommended to anyone who wonders . . . about faith, the future . . . and everything else.

  • This book correctly identifies the corruption and hypocrisy of today's religions. But, unfortunately, it still propagates the christ myth familiar to so many people - a bit disappointing...

  • Due to the title you would expect some critique of religion.
    The portrayed religions faction was over the top and could not have garnered any support from any flock that I have ever seen but...
    There were shadows of good and the evil and warmth was heartfelt which is not the best for me but it was an amusing read.
    When someone is burned on the stake that would be a defining moment in my life and as a reader I would want more detail but I guess if it is done every Friday afternoon the repulsion would fade.
    The book is pure entertainment and is entertaining and well crafted.