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by James Braziel

ePub Birmingham, 35 Miles download
Author:
James Braziel
ISBN13:
978-0553385021
ISBN:
055338502X
Language:
Publisher:
Bantam (February 26, 2008)
Category:
Subcategory:
Science Fiction
ePub file:
1791 kb
Fb2 file:
1786 kb
Other formats:
mbr azw doc lrf
Rating:
4.7
Votes:
466

Birmingham, 35 Miles has been added to your Cart. I welcome James Braziel’s debut novel as an extraordinarily lyrical and innovative work

Birmingham, 35 Miles has been added to your Cart. I welcome James Braziel’s debut novel as an extraordinarily lyrical and innovative work. It is both a speculative novel about the brutal consequences of global warming, and a traditional work that memorializes the landscapes and relationships of the rural South. Most of all, it is a rumination on love and survival that is visionary and inspiring. Anthony Grooms, author of Trouble no More: Stories and Bombingham: A Novel.

He currently teaches creative writing at the University of Cincinnati. Birmingham, 35 Miles is his first novel.

His poetry (published as a collection in a book called Weathervane in 2003) has been twice nominated for the Pushcart Prize, and he was the recipient of the Individual Artist Grant from the Georgia Council for the Arts. He currently teaches creative writing at the University of Cincinnati.

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About Birmingham, 35 Miles

About Birmingham, 35 Miles. In this haunting and poignant debut novel, James Braziel tells an unforgettable story of love, family, and survival across a world that has already begun to di. When the ozone layer opened and the sun relentlessly scorched the land, there was nothing left but to hope.

Birmingham, 35 miles. ark:/13960/t9v13005x. Mathew Harrison had always heard of a better life as close as Birmingham, only thirty-five miles away-zones of blue sky, wet grass, and clean breathable air. But to him it’s a myth, a place guarded by soldiers, off limits to all but the lucky few. Meanwhile Mat works alongside his father, mining only the red clay that the once fertile Alabama soil can offer.

When the ozone layer opened and the sun relentlessly scorched the land, there was nothing left but to hope.

In this haunting and poignant debut novel, James Braziel tells an unforgettable story of love, family, and survival across .

In this haunting and poignant debut novel, James Braziel tells an unforgettable story of love, family, and survival across a world that has already begun to di. Meanwhile Mat works alongside his father, mining only the red clay that the once.

In this powerful and moving new novel by James Braziel, author of Birmingham, 35 Miles, a woman begins a harrowing journey of survival along a passage of terror-and hope. They call it Snakeskin Road. An ever-changing network of highways, rivers, and forgotten trails, it’s used by profiteers of a grim new traffic in human cargo.

More about James Braziel. Birmingham, 35 Miles.

In this haunting and poignant debut novel, James Braziel tells an unforgettable story of love, family, and survival across a world that has already begun to die.…When the ozone layer opened and the sun relentlessly scorched the land, there was nothing left but to hope. Mathew Harrison had always heard of a better life as close as Birmingham, only thirty-five miles away—zones of blue sky, wet grass, and clean breathable air. But to him it’s a myth, a place guarded by soldiers, off limits to all but the lucky few. Meanwhile Mat works alongside his father, mining only the red clay that the once fertile Alabama soil can offer.Now, with the killing deserts on the move again and the woman he loves on a Greyhound heading north, Mat has a travel visa and every reason to leave. But his roots in this lifeless soil inexplicably hold him firmly to the past. Torn between hope and resignation, with time running out, Mat must make a fateful choice between a new life and the one that isn’t ready to let him go.
  • I liked the writing - wasn't thrilled with the story! There were many lyrical, gritty passages in "Birmingham 35 Miles." I felt that I was actually visiting this sere, wind-blown dusty hell of a landscape and I could understand the obsession the main character, Mathew, had with the land and his memories. The descriptive passages were excellent.

    Character development and storyline definitely needed work. I couldn't get too involved in the characters' lives or tribulations. Yes, there were pieces here and there that I enjoyed but the story was disjointed, the characters withdrawn and stilted and I didn't like them much, and, therefore, it was difficult to read.

    I read the sequel to this book Snakeskin Road and this flip-flopped. I thought the storyline and character development were much better in "Snakeskin Road" but the writing itself did not flow as well or affect me as strongly, either positively or negatively.

    I happened to read "Snakeskin Road" first and I actually think it works that way. I don't think it matters in which order you read them. OR maybe that was the whole problem with my reading experience - if I had read this book first, everything would have clicked into place and I would have rated both books 5 stars. But I REALLY don't think so.

  • I confess it's been a while since I read this book by Alabama author James Braziel, but as I enjoyed it, I thought the book deserved another positive vote. As already nicely summarized by "Book Lover," and even by some less friendly reviews, Braziel's writing is lyrical and evocative. To me it is very much a book about place and about holding on to what one knows and loves, even as it pales and palls. The tension between Jennifer's great desire to leave the wasteland of Alabama (I'm speaking, of course, about the 2044 fictitious Alabama, not its real present-day counterpart) and her love for Mat, who feels so bound to family and home, is at the core of this novel, which will undoubtedly frustrate those looking for a fast-paced action novel. But I found the setting not only very plausible, but also the main characters representative of many others who find themselves divided by passions leading them in different directions, even as their love for each other remains undimmed. It is disappointing, however, to reach the end and find an unresolved cliff-hanger leading into his second book, _Snakeskin Road_."

  • This is a sad story, without hope, between dream and madness, made of continuous leaps forward and backward in time by the protagonist, who is the narrator.
    Surely this is a superb demonstration of creative writing by James Braziel, who happens to teach this subject at university.
    But beyond that there isn’t much more to say.
    I could understand if all this drama, this sadness, and madness had been used to see through the eyes of a character in a realistic situation, which could happen in a real context. The creative effort would be worthy, although I would have avoided the book completely, because when I read I want to enjoy myself, not get depressed.
    But this is about an absolutely unlikely post-apocalyptic future, in short, drama and sadness for its own sake, in order to depress the reader, quite the opposite of what it seems from the synopsis on the back cover (I’m referring to the Italian edition that I’ve read) which is deliberately misleading (just to sell the book or maybe who wrote it didn’t even read the book).
    In reading this novel by Braziel you have the feeling more than anything else that this is a sort of long sad prologue to the proper story, but there’s no other story.
    Maybe it is in the following book, “Snakeskin Road”, published a year after and that follows the story of the wife of the protagonist?
    I don’t know if I want to take risks and read this book as well.
    On the positive side, however, the novel is quite short. Ultimately the author isn’t verbose and tells masterfully the backstory of the protagonist, which led him until the epilogue, in part already predicted by the beginning.
    The reading goes on smoothly and the novel is compelling, I cannot deny this, but when I decide to read a science fiction novel I expect something different.

    Rita Carla Francesca Monticelli, author of Red Desert - Point of No Return

  • In 2044, life is a short hard death as the hole in the ozone layer coupled with other human indignities ignored by those who scoffed at the climate crisis. They know Bush pseudoscience has practically destroyed the planet. Anyone born after it was too late only knows of endless heat and incredibly vast dust storms in the southeast dust bowl.

    In this world of an arid inferno Mathew Harrison earns a meager living as a migrant worker in and around Fatama, Alabama. He dreams of finding a better life thirty five miles to the north in Birmingham, but that is outlawed for people like him. Instead he and his father toil in government clay mines that the younger Harrison believes is fake but dangerous work that the Feds have come up with to shut up the outsiders; those not residing in the exclusive Saved World where the affluent live. In spite of the hardship conditions, Mat loves his wife Jennifer and feels they have a future because they have received the golden visas allowing them to obtain menial work in the Saved World.

    BIRMINGHAM, 35 MILES is an intelligently designed grim futuristic thriller that extrapolates much of the current debate on immigration, wealth distribution and climate especially rising temperatures and droughts into a strong parable of An Inconvenient Truth. The story line is vividly dark painting an ominous future for a much divided United States as dust bowls take over the southeast yet enclosed enclaves for the wealthy and their working class spring up in magnet cities like Birmingham. Readers will appreciate James Braziel's look at a portentous ill America that demands action now or condemn our descendants to hell on earth.

    Harriet Klausner