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ePub French Medieval Romances from the Lays of Marie de France, Fiction, Classics, Literary, Action Adventure download

by Marie de France,Eugene Mason

ePub French Medieval Romances from the Lays of Marie de France, Fiction, Classics, Literary, Action  Adventure download
Author:
Marie de France,Eugene Mason
ISBN13:
978-1603128506
ISBN:
1603128506
Language:
Publisher:
Aegypan (March 1, 2007)
Category:
Subcategory:
Action & Adventure
ePub file:
1452 kb
Fb2 file:
1397 kb
Other formats:
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Rating:
4.1
Votes:
734

Marie de France wrote in Francien with some Anglo-Norman influence Eugene Mason's 1911 translation of The Lais of Marie de France is thought to be superseded today by some scholars.

Marie de France wrote in Francien with some Anglo-Norman influence. At a time when most people were illiterate and educated scholars or clerics were usually men, Marie was one of very few women to have achieved such an education. Eugene Marie de France wrote in Francien with some Anglo-Norman influence. Eugene Mason's 1911 translation of The Lais of Marie de France is thought to be superseded today by some scholars.

Product Highlights Interesting, then, that the werewolf is a rather sympathetic and noble character

Tell us if something is incorrect. I've finished the "Lays" and have the two stories that were not by Marie de France to read, but thought I would get some impressions down before I finish them. Interesting, then, that the werewolf is a rather sympathetic and noble character.

The tales included in this little book of translations are derived mainly from the "Lays" of Marie de France. from his preface to Lays of Marie de France).

French Mediaeval Romances from the Lays of Marie de France Marie de FRANCE (12th centu - ), translated by Eugene MASON ( - ). The tales included in this little book of translations are derived mainly from the "Lays" of Marie de France. I do not profess them to be a complete collection of her stories in verse. The ascription varies. Summary by Eugene Mason, from his preface to Lays of Marie de France). This book is in public domain. Thank you for listening.

Translated by Eugene Mason. The ascription varies

Translated by Eugene Mason. Marie's poems are concerned chiefly with love

Read various fiction books with us in our e-reader. Short, narrative poems by a twelfth century poet French poet, the earliest known woman poet of France, Marie de France

Read various fiction books with us in our e-reader. Short, narrative poems by a twelfth century poet French poet, the earliest known woman poet of France, Marie de France. These verses generally focus on glorifying the concept of courtly love through . .he adventures of their main characters, sufferings of lovers who struggle, often unsuccessfully, against social constraints. Her romantic and magical themes, written between 1160 and 1178, may have inspired the musical lais of the later troubadours. One of the great works of Medieval literature.

The lais of Marie de France are a series of twelve short narrative Breton lais by the poet Marie de France. They are written in Anglo-Norman and were probably composed in the late 12th century. The short, narrative poems generally focus on glorifying the concept of courtly love by the adventures of their main characters. Marie's lais are thought to form the basis for what would eventually become the genre known as the Breton lais.

Eugene Mason's translation of Marie de France Breton lais is a classic of medieval .

Eugene Mason's translation of Marie de France Breton lais is a classic of medieval literature. Marie de France's stories are amongst the best examples of medieval literature, and are important source material for the Arthurian legends, and the medieval legends of Brittany and France. Here you will find brave nights, beautiful damsels and feats of chivalry.

Medieval Lays and Legends of Marie de France The fact is that Marie's romances derive farther back than any Breton or Celtic dream.

Medieval Lays and Legends of Marie de France. The Lays of Marie de France. The tales included in this little book of translations are derived mainly from the Lays of Marie de France. The fact is that Marie's romances derive farther back than any Breton or Celtic dream.

Translated by. Eugene Mason. Translated by.

From the Lays of Marie de France.

Eugene Mason's 1911 translation of The Lais of Marie de France is thought to be superseded today by some scholars. It was, however, one of the first broad popular translations of one of the great works of Medieval literature, the "Lais" of the mysterious Marie de France, and two other Medieval French romances. Little is known today about Marie de France, save a contemporary mention of her as the author of the "Lais," which were originally long, lyrical poems often sung by the troubadours of the day -- traveling singers who played ancient instruments that have since been forgotten. Some refer to the Italian Renaissance, but have forgotten the earlier French flowering of poetry, music and culture, of which Marie was the "queen," although we know only her name and work today. Said to be most popular among women, Marie's "lais" have born fruit to this day, in the form of chivalric, romantic, and even supernatural tales: one of the "lais" is the story of a werewolf.

  • I came to this book sort of through the back door. I was watching a course that I bought on the Western Cannon by Harold Bloom. The professor was explaining why Marie de France was included.

    Even though there are many ladies of Marie de France, my first intent was only to read "The Lay of The Werewolf." Because this was in hand I could not help myself but to read the whole book.

    If the story sound familiar is probably because they are all sort of Carl Jung - Archetypes; by substituting names these stories are even similar to those I read of the different Southwest United States Native Americans.

    For me there is no danger in reading this book. However the book is also used to help French students in translation. When I studied German instructor said that he also had learn German through reading and translating the classics. His first trip to Germany was very successful and people understood what he was saying. However a lady with a young kid pointed to him and told the kid that he spoke classic ancient German very well.

    Translated by Eugene Mason (1862 - 1935)
    With a new select bibliography for today's students
    And a retelling of the Lay of the Werewolf (Bisclavert) by Mark Lord

    The originals of the narratives are to be found in Roquefort's edition of the Poésies de Marie de France; and a volume of Nouvelles Franςoises en Prose, edited by Moland and D'Héricault; and in M. Gaston Raynaud's text of La Chatelaine de Vergi.

    Contains:
    The Lay of Gugemar
    The Lay of the Dolorous Knight
    The Lay of Eliduc
    The Lay of the Nightingale
    The lay of Sir Launfal
    The lay of Two Lovers
    The lay of the Were Wolf
    The lay of Milon
    The lay of Yonec
    The lay of the Thorn
    The lay of Graelent
    A Story of Beyond the Sea
    The Chatelaine of Vergi
    Bisclavert (The Werewolf): A short story by Mark Lord (2010)

  • When I got this Ebook I thought the original text in French would be in it too. But it is only an English translation, not rhymed, just plain text. I have just finished the first lay, and it shows how people in the Middle Ages thought. Just compare it to the troubadour songs and enjoy our modern times... life was not one bit better in that time ! Forget about the good old times. Specially for women !

  • This was an easy and fun read. I highly recommend it to anyone who likes Medieval literature, especially Arthurian romances, and fairy and folk tales. It flows nicely and is poetic. It is descriptive enough to make you feel you're there and to make you empathize with the characters, but it still gets to the point.

    I originally intended to read the stories little by little as I was between novels, but I ended up reading it all at once because I was enjoying it so much.

    My only complaint is that I wish the story about Tristan had been longer because he is my favorite Arthurian character. But I suppose I can read about him elsewhere. My favorite was A Story of Beyond the Sea. It reminded me in many ways of the story of Joseph in Genesis. It also reminded me of some of the stories in the Decameron by Giovanni Boccaccio.

  • I commend the volunteers who uploaded this item for online transmission. Now any student of the French language or seeker of female voices from Medieval times can download this item to their Kindle for free. This is a simply beautiful translation in what I would term 'high Victorian English' - very literate, almost like the style of Pyle's Robin Hood. But very easy to read, no chore to follow. This collection is a must for fans of Marie de France. Works such as this were NOT available when I studied advanced French courses forty years ago. Textbooks included verses of Francois Villon but nothing of Marie de France.

  • The Lai of Marie de France are a terrific read if you enjoy poetry. However the translation in this version is far too literal. Even the names of people have been translated in a terrible way that makes these read more like fables about anthropomorphized flora and fauna than Arthurian knights and ladies.

  • You need to have an inner disposition of a slower pace to read the book. It is a different era, everything is more innocent, everything is more respected .. it is a great book, but come with the right mood to it .. you will like it.

  • Mm, love Marie. There weren't many writers then, and she wrote, which is enough reason to read this for me.

  • Hard book to read all i can say . I dont enjoy this type of books. Mabyye a history buff wld like it .