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ePub Day of the Cheetah download

by Joseph Campanella,Dale Brown

ePub Day of the Cheetah download
Author:
Joseph Campanella,Dale Brown
ISBN13:
978-1558002234
ISBN:
1558002235
Language:
Publisher:
Dove Entertainment Inc (September 1, 1989)
Category:
Subcategory:
Action & Adventure
ePub file:
1765 kb
Fb2 file:
1995 kb
Other formats:
docx doc mobi azw
Rating:
4.3
Votes:
806

Dale Brown's first book, "Flight of the Old Dog" was fun although implausible. In Day of the Cheetah Brown starts with an interesting premise

Dale Brown's first book, "Flight of the Old Dog" was fun although implausible. I bought this book because I thought it might also be fun. In Day of the Cheetah Brown starts with an interesting premise. A Russian mole who infiltrates the US Air Forces most advanced air combat fighter program and becomes the lead test pilot. Brown does a credible job of creating this character and describing his psychology.

Written by Dale Brown, Audiobook narrated by Joseph Campanella. Flight of the Old Dog is the runaway best seller that launched the phenomenal career of Dale Brown. It is the riveting story of America's military superiority being surpassed as our greatest enemy masters space-to-Earth weapons technology - neutralizing the .

Day of the Cheetah is a 1989 technothriller novel written by former US Air Force officer Dale Brown. It is part of Brown's Patrick McLanahan series of novels. A number of key characters were killed in Day of the Cheetah, only to reappear in later books, as when DotC was first written, Brown did not intend to write any further books in the series. Some parts of the plot were passively referenced in Brown's 1991 novel Sky Masters, which is set two years before most of the events in Cheetah.

Dale Brown (Goodreads Author), Joseph Campanella (Narrator). Day of the Cheetah (Patrick McLanahan, Published by Books on Tape. ISBN: 1558002235 (ISBN13: 9781558002234).

Dale Brown Day of the Cheetah. I would like to thank the United States Air Force Aeronautical Systems Division (ASD), Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio, for their invaluable assistance in gathering information on America’s future fighter aircraft. ASD is a dream come true for an ex-Air Force nav, wistful fighter pilot, and fiction writer. I’m happy you’re with me. Dedication. Day of the Cheetah is dedicated to two very special people who helped me over the years.

Written by Dale Brown, narrated by Joseph Campanella. By J R P HICKS on 19-01-18.

McLanahan and his Air Force compatriots take up the challenge using a modified F-15E called Cheetah, which is designed to capture or destroy DreamStar. Read by actor Joseph Campanella, this nail-biting thriller is high-tech suspense at its best.

About Day of the Cheetah. In this explosive New York Times bestseller, Dale Brown creates a shattering scenario of the ultimate race for technolog. merica’s most advanced fighter plane, DreamStar, has been hijacked.

Books related to Day of the Cheetah. The Jake Fonko Series: Books 1, 2 & 3.

I don’t believe it, Murphy said. You realize that all of the world’s hottest jets and weapons in the past thirty years went through there? Those guys fly planes and test weapons out there that are years ahead of anything that exists in the real world. And you’re going to be assigned there-. I said I don’t have an assignment, Murph.

America's most advanced fighter plane is hijacked-and the greatest high-flying chase of all time begins... "Terrific. Authentic and gripping." (The New York Times)
  • Excellent story of future technology - thought controlled aircraft (shades of Firefox with Clint Eastwood). As an Air Force Computer Systems Officer, I saw a video presentation of a new helmet under development that would pick up certain electrical impulses from a skull cap worn by a pilot. Those impulses could trigger certain functionality in the aircraft's systems. In the video I saw a pilot touch a touch-screen radar display, then touched the symbol for the left wing tip weapon (AIM-9L). There was an immediate 'growl' over the audio and then the pilot 'thought' of the word 'Launch' and the weapon came off the rail. That was back in the late 1980's at the Air Force Wright Aeronautical Laboratory at Wright-Patterson AFB, OH.

  • I re-read this book after going back and re-reading Flight of the Old Dog. Well, if Old Dog held up really well, Cheetah didn't hold up quite as well. Don't get me wrong, it was solid, but it didn't blow me away.

    Eight years after the Old Dog, Brad Elliot is in charge of Dreamland. Of course the whole gang is there and Patrick McLanahan is running the Dreamstar project, basically a combination of a thought-controlled airplane and a next-generation jet with a lot more maneuverability and technology than the current version.

    Unfortunately the test pilot for Dreamstar is Kenneth James, who is actually a deep cover Soviet spy who was put in place before he even joined the Air Force Academy. The Russians come up with the idea that James should steal Dreamstar, since they haven't been able to replicate the technology with the information he's been giving them. He succeeds and then McLanahan has to chase him all over the Western hemisphere.

    There's a lot here. Sci-fi. Spy drama. Military jargon. An old-fashioned revenge novel. Some parts work better than ever. 25 years later, I'm not sure Dale Brown convinced me that a thought controlled airplane is better than one powered by a computer built in 2014. But the flying is good and the spy drama is good.

    Probably 3.5 stars overall.

  • This book didn’t start off well for me. I thought maybe because this is a first for me with this author and that I had to get adjusted to his writing style or maybe because I started of with book #4 of this series and I’m not use to the protagonist involved in this story whatever it was it started getting better like a quarter into the book. After adjusting to the writing style and getting use to the story about planes, planes and more planes, it became easy to follow. The characters were well developed especially the evil one. Some parts were drawn out and were really over extended with explanations but really did enjoy it and will continue the series.

  • Great story and character content - 5-star. Problem is, the editing is awful. It appears that an original printed copy was scanned and was not properly checked before it was published in Kindle format. Very distracting. Misspelled and miss-used words, / used when and I should have been there based on the context. Being a former Air Force pilot I very much enjoyed the story and believe the author very knowledgeable and that the requisite research has been done, but starting with page 2 I was very distracted with errors throughout.

  • Being a fan of D. Brown's books, this one tops my list. Although it is more than likely a work of science fiction, I was left wondering just how much of it is "science fact" given our lightning speed advances in the field of computerization, as we're now seemingly and completely surrounded by more than just social media, to wit, our phones, cars, and who else knows what and how we're connected to cyber space, and what not. His description of the principal protagonist, the deep cover KGB agent, and his pursuers, the overall subliminal and subconscious interconnection to the aircraft is, pun intended, mind boggling. The avionics described must've cost Brown some considerable time - as well as that of his assistants - plenty of time and rsearch. Just the same, a good read that requires plenty of brain power to just grasp what he's conveying in a work of fiction... or is it fact?

  • Dale Brown's first book, "Flight of the Old Dog" was fun although implausible. I bought this book because I thought it might also be fun

    In Day of the Cheetah Brown starts with an interesting premise. A Russian mole who infiltrates the US Air Forces most advanced air combat fighter program and becomes the lead test pilot. Brown does a credible job of creating this character and describing his psychology.

    The story is engaging to a point but then just drags on and on and on. So much that I didn't bother to finish it. I think it is poorly edited with too many back stories and sub plots. Books like this are best when they concentrate on moving the story. This has huge sections that do little to advance the main plot.

    I got bored and did not finish it. I just stopped caring what would happen next.

  • Dale Brown tells stories that hold my interest better than Tom Clancy, and I love Tom Clancy's stories. Dale Brown writes mostly about USAF aircraft that do have truth to them, some of it makes you wonder if we do have these capabilities with our aircraft today. Being ex-Air Force, aircraft electrical specialist, still do aircraft avionics modifications install today on U.S. military planes, I can see some of the capabilities might be true. The stories are told by different people in the books, ordinary people doing amazing tasks with amazing technology on current aircraft. The stories are also about real events but fictionalized. They're just FUN to read.