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ePub Taking Comfort (Macmillan New Writing) download

by Roger Morris

ePub Taking Comfort (Macmillan New Writing) download
Author:
Roger Morris
ISBN13:
978-0230001374
ISBN:
0230001378
Language:
Publisher:
Pan Macmillan (October 1, 2006)
Category:
Subcategory:
Action & Adventure
ePub file:
1894 kb
Fb2 file:
1413 kb
Other formats:
azw lrf txt doc
Rating:
4.5
Votes:
746

Morris and Roger Morris. What can you do to feel safe in a dangerous world? When Rob Saunders witnesses a young Japanese student commit suicide, he impulsively takes the folder she dropped as she threw herself under a tube train.

Morris and Roger Morris. He finds himself taking souvenirs from a series of tragic or threatening events, at the same time initiating an edgy affair with a work colleague. His behavior becomes increasingly obsessive.

I've written some books. Taking Comfort came out in 2006, published by Macmillan New Writing. A Gentle Axe (written as . Morris) came out in 2007, published by Faber in the UK and Penguin in the US, and a number of other publishers around the world. My next book, A Vengeful Longing (also written as . Morris) is due out in the UK in February 2008. I guess that will come round soon enough. Taking Comfort is a contemporary urban novel about anxiety and consumerism.

Items related to Taking Comfort (Macmillan New Writing). Roger Morris is an award-winning author and investigative journalist who served on the senior staff of the National Security Council under presidents Lyndon Johnson and Richard Nixon. Roger Morris Taking Comfort (Macmillan New Writing). ISBN 13: 9780230001374. Taking Comfort (Macmillan New Writing). He is the author of several critically acclaimed books, including "Richard Milhous Nixon: The Rise of an American Politician, 1913-1952 "and the bestselling "Partners in Power: The Clintons and Their America," He lives in Seattle, Washington.

Taking Comfort (MacMillan New Writing). Learn More at LibraryThing. Roger Morris at LibraryThing. ISBN 9780230007406 (978-0-230-00740-6) Softcover, Pan Macmillan, 2007. Find signed collectible books: 'Taking Comfort (MacMillan New Writing)'.

Full marks to Macmillan New Writing for publishing this novel. an excellent novel and one I would recommend. - Alan Roche, Jai Clare’s blog, May 17, 2006. There is much to recommend in this novel. Morris can write, and write well. - Ian Hocking, Spike Magazine, 29 March, 2006. Roger N Morris (born 1960 in Manchester) is an English writer and advertising copywriter. 0230001378 (ISBN13: 9780230001374). His short fiction has been published in a number of mainstream, genre, and literary publications.

Macmillan New Writing is an imprint of the British publishing company Pan Macmillan. Designed to attract previously unpublished authors, it offers aspiring novelists 20% of royalties from the sale of their book but no advance on signing. Books Macmillan New Writing has published have been shortlisted for the Orange Prize for Fiction, the CWA New Blood Dagger, the Edgar Award for best paperback original, the Romantic Novelists' Association's Romantic Novel of the Year, and the Wales Book of the Year.

Roger Morris, whose atmospheric Taking Comfort was selected for the list from over 45,000 manuscripts, reports from yesterday's . Macmillan launched its New Writing list last year to give a "voice to talented new authors"

Roger Morris, whose atmospheric Taking Comfort was selected for the list from over 45,000 manuscripts, reports from yesterday's launch party. Macmillan launched its New Writing list last year to give a "voice to talented new authors". Although Hari Kunzru called it "the Ryanair of publishing", the venture proceeded smoothly to launch with six titles published yesterday. Roger Morris, whose atmospheric Taking Comfort was selected for the list from over 45,000 manuscripts, reports from yesterday's launch party.

Roger N Morris (born 1960 in Manchester) is an English writer and advertising copywriter His first novel, Taking Comfort, is published by Macmillan New Writing and appeared in April 2006.

Roger N Morris (born 1960 in Manchester) is an English writer and advertising copywriter. One of his short stories, "The Devil's Drum", appeared in the horror anthology Darkness Rising, and was subsequently made into an opera performed by the Solaris Musical Theatre Company in the Purcell Room on London's South Bank. His first novel, Taking Comfort, is published by Macmillan New Writing and appeared in April 2006

What can you do to feel safe in a dangerous world? When Rob Saunders witnesses a young Japanese student commit suicide, he impulsively takes the folder she dropped as she threw herself under a tube train. He finds himself taking souvenirs from a series of tragic or threatening events, at the same time initiating an edgy affair with a work colleague. His behavior becomes increasingly obsessive. The lines blur between witnessing, seeking out, and initiating tragedy. Things spiral out of control when he discovers a dead body while he's jogging in the woods. Stylistically bold, technically accomplished, this fast-paced pageturner explores the anxieties and survival strategies of a post-9/11 world.
  • It's been a day since I've finished Taking Comfort, by Roger Morris, and I'm still not quite sure what to write here. It's not an easy book to sum up, nor is it easy to review.

    I don't review books I can't consider five-star reads, and I have no reservations about reviewing Taking Comfort. It's just... Well.

    The writing, to begin with, takes a huge chance. It's in present tense; it's full of Product Placement; it holds its characters at arm's length even as it assumes their points of view. Done badly, this could provide a great example of style over substance. However, Morris does it very well. So all this--at least in my readerly eyes--underlines the book's message: We live in a fearful world, in fearful times. We fear. To assuage this fear, to survive in this world, we find comfort where we must. We create our own talismans: be they über-designed products that ease and decorate our day, the routines we tread, or even--as Morris' protagonist, marketing man Rob Saunders, knows too well--the souvenirs we collect from disasters that occur on our turf.

    Or, sometimes, disasters on turf we have to make a special effort to reach.

    This is Saunders' dilemma. He begins his collection almost accidentally, picking up the plastic notebook of a Japanese teenager who commits suicide in the London Tube. Yes, this is creepy; Saunders knows it. He acknowledges it to himself, even as he realizes that it brings him some strange measure of comfort. Doing such a thing once is creepy, but perhaps forgiveable. But then, there's the napkin with the tears of a jilted lover, the bloody handkerchief...and then, the disasters he must go out of his way to witness. And a "normal" man, a businessman in a suit, becomes a furtive obsessive with a suitcase ("The Di Beradino Classic...crafted in beautiful vegetable tanned leather...") full of secrets.

    How Morris plays with this, and with the fears and creepiness of others, and with all those marketing-copy-descriptions of the products of Saunders' sterile, disaster-filled world, keeps the pages turning.

    This book, I might add, is not for everyone. It's not your average read. It's outrageous; it will provoke debate and, no doubt, some derision. Some will think it's trickery; some might even think it's shallow. I think it's neither; I think it's altogether too appropriate to our times. I think it's very good.

    Susan O'Neill, author, Don't Mean Nothing: Short Stories of Vietnam (of course, there's a product link..which rather reinforces Morris' point...)

  • "Rob Saunders just wants to feel safe, but the world is a dangerous place."

    Rob Saunders is the lead character in this stylish novel by Roger Morris. After witnessing a suicide one morning, Saunders impulsively picks up the notebook the girl dropped, and is strangely comforted by the presence of this souvenir in his briefcase. But as we read further into the book, we learn that Saunders is not the only character who finds comfort in routine, in physical objects, in hopes and dreams that may never be realized (yet are always on the horizon).

    Every character in this book is affected by--and witness to--Saunders' movements in his daily life, and in fact, through use of different POVs, we know what they are thinking and feeling, know how they react to Saunders' increasingly obsessive actions as he seeks out more and more tragedies (and souvenirs), and know what their own quirks and "comforts" are. People crave their routines, while also yearning to break out of their ruts and do something exciting or spontaneous. Conversely, if their routine is upset, they feel lost. But how can one feel safe and comforted in this increasingly unsafe new world of terrorism, climate change, and suicide bombers anyway? That's the question Morris poses.

    As the story progresses, Saunders' desire for more and more comfort drives him (ironically) into more and more dangerous situations. In the end, something has to give. Morris' use of short chapters and different character POVs really keep the pace of this novel fast, as each chapter flows perfectly into the next. If you are looking for a quick, engrossing, different book to read, I highly recommend Roger Morris' Taking Comfort.