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by Sheri S. Tepper

ePub The Gate to Women's Country: A Novel download
Author:
Sheri S. Tepper
ISBN13:
978-0553280647
ISBN:
0553280643
Language:
Publisher:
Spectra; unknown edition (February 1, 1993)
Category:
Subcategory:
Action & Adventure
ePub file:
1892 kb
Fb2 file:
1438 kb
Other formats:
lit lrf txt doc
Rating:
4.8
Votes:
306

Start by marking The Gate to Women's Country as Want to Read .

Start by marking The Gate to Women's Country as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Tepper's finest novel to date is set in a post-holocaust feminist dystopia that offers only two political alternatives: a repressive polygamist sect that is slowly self-destructing through inbreeding and the matriarchal dictatorship called Women's Country. As in Tepper's Awakeners series books, the rigid social systems are tempered by the voices of individual experience and, here, by an imaginative reworking of The Trojan Woman that runs through the text. A rewarding and challenging novel that is to be valued for its provocative ideas.

The Gate to Women's Country is a post-apocalyptic novel by American writer Sheri S. Tepper, published in 1988. It describes a world set three hundred years into the future after a catastrophic war which has fractured the United States into several nations. The story is set in "Women's Country", apparently in the former Pacific Northwest. They have evolved in the direction of Ecotopia, reverting to a sustainable economy based on small cities and low-tech local agriculture.

Sheri Tepper - Gate To Women's Country. STAVIA SAW HERSELF as in a picture, from the outside, a darkly cloaked figure moving along a cobbled street, the stones shinned with a soft, early spring rain. On either side the gutters ran with an infant chuckle and gurgle, baby streams being amused with themselves

Sheri S. Tepper (1929–2016) is the award-winning author of A Plague of Angels, Sideshow, Beauty, Raising the Stones, Grass, The Gate to Women's Country, After Long Silence, and Shadow's End. Grass was a New York Times Notable Book and Hugo Award nominee, and Beauty.

Sheri S. Grass was a New York Times Notable Book and Hugo Award nominee, and Beauty was voted Best Fantasy Novel by the readers of Locus magazine. Библиографические данные. The Gate to Women's Country: A Novel.

Home Sheri S. Tepper The Gate to Women's Country. You have to give me the book, Chernon. They were sitting side by side on the wide couch, not touching, embarrassed by the place, by the time. The Gate to Women's Country, . 6. In exchange for one, Stavia.

This is the one Sheri Tepper book and idea, that I have the most trouble with, although in many of her other books she does come down hard on ALL males. Maybe I've been very very lucky to have known a lot of liberated males during my lifetime, and learned how to get-around the more controlling ones. I think it is important for all society to be integrated in all ways and that both genders (or all genders) contribute to the wealth of knowledge.

Lively, thought-provoking. the plot is ingenious, packing a wallop of a surprise. Tepper’s cast of both ordinary and extraordinary people play out a powerful drama whose significance goes beyond sex to deal with the toughest problem of all, the challenge of surmounting humanity’s most dangerous flaws so we can survive-despite ourselves.

Old Bowough Bird lay on a mattress in the wagon behind them, Kostia and Tonia beside him, stubbornly present despite Septemius’ repeated insistence that they remain in Marthatown.

Old Bowough Bird lay on a mattress in the wagon behind them, Kostia and Tonia beside him, stubbornly present despite Septemius’ repeated insistence that they remain in Marthatown is former trip to the south, and he had been of no mind to risk the twins even to what little he remembered of that place. Women had been in short supply, as he recalled. By now, if things had gone on as it seemed they would, the situation might be growing somewhat desperate. He had intended to say something of this to young Stavia, but had not had the opportunity.

Аудиокнига "The Gate to Women’s Country", Sheri S. Tepper. Читает Emily Durante. Мгновенный доступ к вашим любимым книгам без обязательной ежемесячной платы

Аудиокнига "The Gate to Women’s Country", Sheri S. Мгновенный доступ к вашим любимым книгам без обязательной ежемесячной платы. Слушайте книги через Интернет и в офлайн-режиме на устройствах Android, iOS, Chromecast, а также с помощью Google Ассистента. Скачайте Google Play Аудиокниги сегодня!

“Lively, thought-provoking . . . the plot is ingenious, packing a wallop of a surprise . . . Tepper knows how to write a well-made, on-moving story with strong characters. . . . She takes the mental risks that are the lifeblood of science fiction and all imaginative narrative.”—Ursula K. LeGuin, Los Angeles TimesSince the flames died three hundred years ago, human civilization has evolved into a dual society: Women’s Country, where walled towns enclose what’s left of past civilization, nurtured by women and a few nonviolent men; and the adjacent garrisons where warrior men live—the lost brothers, sons, and lovers of those in Women’s Country.Two societies. Two competing dreams. Two ways of life, kept apart by walls stronger than stone. And yet there is a gate between them. . . .“Tepper not only keeps us reading . . . she provokes a new look at the old issues.”—The Washington Post“Tepper’s cast of both ordinary and extraordinary people play out a powerful drama whose significance goes beyond sex to deal with the toughest problem of all, the challenge of surmounting humanity’s most dangerous flaws so we can survive—despite ourselves.”—Locus
  • Sheri S. Tepper writes wonderful light horror and Science (shall we say "Speculative") fiction/fantasy. This is my personal all-time favorite. I must have bought t four or five times and keep giving copies away. It is set in the indeterminate future when society as we know it is long dead and people live in semi-barbaric camps (or do they??) with strict division between the MEN (who live outside the village walls and practice a martial/Spartan lifestyle complete with marching and banners and the women and "softer" men who live in Women's Country inside the walls.
    This is a very dangerous novel that has a clear point of view and presents it persuasively in the context of an exceedingly enjoyable adventure story. Ms. Tepper's later works get a bit too heavy handed for my (male) taste but this one hits the perfect balance between making a point and shoving it up your nose!! I shall never forget her point about the worship of "The Fruits of Saint Penis"

  • Okay, I first read this probably around when it first came out. I was going through my own women's lib learning curve and thought this would be very interesting since I'd loved most of SST's other fantasy works. I however finished that reading with very mixed feelings. I reread it again when I was well into my own adulthood and had a more solid grasp on where my own liberation and "feminism" (I don't like that word and never felt it was defined properly) and still found myself disagreeing with the premise. Now that I'm a senior female, decided I needed to read it again and found it, again, kind of wrong. This time I questioned why things were done the way they were in the book--why relegate all male children to a military existence to begin with? Doesn't make much sense to me. Just sort out the male children with violent tendencies. But I guess nowadays we call that jail and prison. This is the one Sheri Tepper book and idea, that I have the most trouble with, although in many of her other books she does come down hard on ALL males. Maybe I've been very very lucky to have known a lot of liberated males during my lifetime, and learned how to get-around the more controlling ones. I think it is important for all society to be integrated in all ways and that both genders (or all genders) contribute to the wealth of knowledge. I also believe that if mothers raised their sons to be more responsible humans, not just responsible males but just responsible souls, we probably wouldn't have so many males who feel they should be privileged and who feel they are above everyone else. I do blame the mothers for a lot of the problems, I saw it in my own family and in the family. I don't think segregating the males from the females solves anything--no more than segregating black and white, or old and young, or rich from not rich, etc. That just creates more division and neither end understands the other, or even thinks of the other as human. I also never found the "servors" (not a good name for that status because it makes it sound too much like those people are just and never will be anything more than servants) to be appealing at all, to me they feel more like eunices with no sex appeal--so unless all those women are being artificially inseminated (and what's the fun in that?), then I don't know how procreation goes on in Women's Country. I also know men, the vast majority of men, need a certain amount of challenge and competition(? not quite right but I can't think of the word I want) for testosterone to continue to be high enough to feel like males--men need a certain kind of male dominance, not control or abuse or real dominance, but they need to feel they are manly men in order to procreate successfully. Emasculated males don't work well.

  • Well, I thought I had already made my comments about this book but maybe not. I first read this book when it first came out. I had read some of the writer's books before and enjoyed them in varying degrees. I liked this book, and recommended it to my then teenage daughter. She liked it and passed the recommendation on to her friends. Although that was years ago memory of the book has stayed evergreen and I downloaded it on my kindle and re-read it. Memory, being fraught with lapses, didn't serve me all thate and most of the story was new to me. I enjoyed it almost as a first-time read. I had forgotten the use of the great tragedy "The Trojan Women" in the story, but I found it singularly appropriate for the book's story and theme. The book is regarded as a "feminist" tome, but it really is a human story and does address the sins and results of male-dominated society. The women in the story have taken actions to alliviate the effects of such a society and are successful in their efforts. This isn't a beautiful or elegant book--though there are isolated moments--but the writing is serviceable and readable; what makes it such a good work is its thought-provoking nature. I treasure this book and have no hesitation recommending it to anyone.