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by John P. Marquand

ePub The Late George Apley download
Author:
John P. Marquand
ISBN13:
978-0896215900
ISBN:
0896215903
Language:
Publisher:
Thorndike Pr; Large Print edition (January 1, 1985)
Category:
Subcategory:
Classics
ePub file:
1494 kb
Fb2 file:
1421 kb
Other formats:
mobi docx lrf txt
Rating:
4.7
Votes:
813

In 1925, Marquand published his first important book, Lord Timothy . In the late 1930s, Marquand began producing a series of novels on the dilemmas of class

In 1925, Marquand published his first important book, Lord Timothy Dexter, an exploration of the life and legend of eighteenth-century Newburyport eccentric Timothy Dexter (1763–1806). By the mid-1930s he was a prolific and successful writer of fiction for slick magazines like the Saturday Evening Post. In the late 1930s, Marquand began producing a series of novels on the dilemmas of class. The first of these novels, The Late George Apley (1937), a satire of Boston's upper class, won the Pulitzer Prize for the Novel in 1938.

The Late George Apley book.

The Late George Apley. The Late George Apley. by. Marquand,John P. Publication date. MILLION BOOKS ORIGINAL TIFF ZIP download. Literature, Literature, Literature. SINGLE PAGE PROCESSED TIFF ZIP download.

The Late George Apley is a 1937 novel by John Phillips Marquand. It is a satire of Boston's upper class. The title character is a Harvard-educated WASP living on Beacon Hill in downtown Boston. It's an epistolary novel, made up mostly of letters to and from the title character. The book was acclaimed as the first "serious" work by Marquand, who had previously been known for his Mr. Moto spy novels and other popular fiction. It was a bestseller and won the Pulitzer Prize for the Novel in 1938

John Phillips Marquand (November 10, 1893 – July 16, 1960) was a 20th-century American novelist.

John Phillips Marquand (November 10, 1893 – July 16, 1960) was a 20th-century American novelist. He achieved popular success and critical respect, winning a Pulitzer Prize for "The Late George Apley" in 1938, and creating the Mr. Moto spy series. One of his abiding themes was the confining nature of life in America's upper class and among those who aspired to join it. Marquand treated those whose lives were bound by these unwritten codes with a characteristic mix of respect and satire. Youth and early adulthood.

THE LATE GEORGE APLEY was John P. Marquand's best-selling novel and stayed on the best-seller lists in the late 1930s. Kind of a tribute to a rather inconsequential Boston Brahmin, the book is definitely worth reading even today. The Late George Apley was a wonderful read. I have known folks like him who are third or fourth generations of inherited wealth who don't seem to know what to do with themselves. With no motivation or need to "test themselves", they seem to suffer from a lack of competence or mastery.

This page contains details about the Fiction book The Late George Apley by John P. Marquand published in 1937. This book is the 1984th greatest Fiction book of all time as determined by thegreatestbooks. Sweeping us into the inner sanctum of Boston society, into the Beacon Hill town houses and exclusive private clubs where only the city's wealthiest and most powerful congregate, the novel gives us - through the story of one family and its patriarch, the recently deceased George Apley - the portrait of an entire society in transition.

A poor boy falls in love with a privileged young woman and learns a bitter lesson about the haves and the have-nots in this dramatic tale from the Pulitzer Prize–winning author of The Late George Apley As a young boy, Tom Michael walked with his father, Alfred, along the streets of Michael's Harbor, Massachusetts, and gazed across the water at. the stately mansions on Warning Hill.

John Phillips Marquand (1893 –1960) was an American writer. he achieved popular success and critical respect for his satirical novels, winning a Pulitzer Prize for The Late George Apley in 1938. Originally best known for his Mr. Moto spy stories, he achieved popular success and critical respect for his satirical novels, winning a Pulitzer Prize for The Late George Apley in 1938.

One feels that John Marquand has written this book with tongue in cheek at times - with certain personal bitterness . A fictional biography of a gentleman of the old school, Hoston personified in the character of George Apley

One feels that John Marquand has written this book with tongue in cheek at times - with certain personal bitterness yearning for expression - but with occasional acceptance, albeit unwilling, of the traditions and ideals and standards of his forbears. Certainly he laid aside his accepted role of spinner of yarns. He ignored the established rules of the fiction form. A fictional biography of a gentleman of the old school, Hoston personified in the character of George Apley. He pokes gentle - or bitter - fun at Boston and the Bostonians, but he does it out of his character's own mouth and pen.

A satire of turn-of-the-century Boston traces the life of George Apley, a wealthy businessman who sacrifices his individuality to social custom and tradition
  • The novel, largely an epistolary one, gives a deep and thoughtful overview of the life of George Apley, a scion of Boston during the last half of the 19th century and the first part of the 20th. What made this book memorable for me was the fact that I have known people like George Apley -- people who are wealthy and yet full of conviction about doing the right thing. I found a lot of messages in this book that we today might do well to heed, such as Apley's insistence that rich people who flaunt their wealth by building ostentatious homes or getting-and-spending are missing the point (of life) entirely. He is so full of conviction that the wealthy have deep and almost eternal obligations -- he derived this notion from his father, John, who in turn derived it from his father, Moses Apley.

    I was at first put off by the inherent snobbery of the Apleys and their friends/consorts. "You must join the Province Club," or, "You must join the Berkley Club," or "Son, you must not be seen with people who are not of our class," and what-have-you. All of this seemed at first like artifice to me. And in a way, it is -- but taken along with Apley's character, which is lovingly developed in this book, these strictures fit perfectly with the Apley family (and many other intellectual New Englanders) and the morals of what may have been America's only expression of nobility, the people of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Apley, despite how much he cuts himself off from the more sanguine aspects of society, is a noble man, with the purest intentions and a far-seeing mind.

    As he says near the end of the book, "There must be a class which sets a tone, not for its own pleasure, but because of the responsibility it owes to others." I ended the book with a bittersweet feeling -- I actually had come to feel tenderly toward this gentleman (indeed he was a gentleman) in the closing chapters, and no longer saw him as a stuffed shirt confined to an outdated morality. Marquand developed him beautifully, and brought to me, as the book ended, a very endearing old fellow who had a sense of his own shortcomings yet had done all he could to leave the world a better place.

  • For the first 25 or so pages of this wonderful novel, I didn't know what to expect. In truth, I felt a little negative. Why was I reading a book about a man who seemed to be a fusty Boston Brahmin? As much as I love Boston, I don't have much patience with those for whom Harvard (and certain clubs, and the Athenaeum, and so on) are the center of the universe. And they were certainly at the center of George Apley's universe.

    As I read on, I was hooked, despite myself, on the story of this upright and well-meaning man for whom a rich life, at least as he comes to understand it, seems always just out of reach. Marquand narrates the story through the use of fictional letters by Apley's family members and friends (along with his replies). This technique lends a quality of delicate formality to the "biography," as if one were reading one of those old books whose pages must be cut. Not only are the man and the world he inhabited lost to us, but also the very way in which men and women of his time expressed their thoughts and hopes.

    Its twin is William Dean Howells' "The Rise of Silas Lapham." This is a tale of a man from the provinces (Vermont, then) who makes a fortune in paint manufacturing and comes to take his place among the wealthy inhabitants of Gilded Age Boston. One can imagine Lapham and Apley meeting in some velvet-draped drawing room, and one can imagine as well their mutual incomprehension. The seemingly crass new world that Apley deplores is the sphere of Lapham; the snobberies and fingerbowls that so confuse Lapham is the sphere of Apley.

    Both of these novels give great pleasure and desire a wider readership.

    M. Feldman

  • What a great book. Too bad we don't have more brilliant writers like Marquand now or the educational establishment to appreciate such great work. The book is told through a series of fictional letters to and buy the title character throughout his life. It is similar in tone to another Marquand classic, H.M. Pulham Esquire, but here is brilliantly sketched through second hand observation of correspondence. In today's world of email and texting it will be difficult to realize the critical historical value of writing that may be lost to future generations, but a book like this in broad circulation could do much. I found myself wishing I did a better job of cataloging life in written words. The film adaptation while entertaining is not up to the standard of the book and takes many liberties with the story. Both the book and film walk a fine line of endorsing or criticizing the main character's conservatism, but really leaves the reader to his own conclusions. A brilliant work. I also recommend Pulham Esquire, but there the film actually outpaces the book as MGM managed to spin the tale into a great love story with Robert Young and Hedy Lamarr. See that film.

  • If there's such a thing as a sympathetic satire, this is it. THE LATE GEORGE APLEY was John P. Marquand's best-selling novel and stayed on the best-seller lists in the late 1930s. Kind of a tribute to a rather inconsequential Boston Brahmin, the book is definitely worth reading even today.