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ePub Through a Glass, Darkly download

by Jostein Gaarder

ePub Through a Glass, Darkly download
Author:
Jostein Gaarder
ISBN13:
978-1858817699
ISBN:
1858817692
Language:
Publisher:
Orion Pub Co (September 30, 2004)
Category:
Subcategory:
Contemporary
ePub file:
1103 kb
Fb2 file:
1896 kb
Other formats:
mobi lrf mobi txt
Rating:
4.8
Votes:
710

Through A Glass, Darkly (original Norwegian title: I et speil, i en gåte) is a novel by Norwegian author Jostein Gaarder published in 1993. An award-winning film adaptation was released in 2008.

Through A Glass, Darkly (original Norwegian title: I et speil, i en gåte) is a novel by Norwegian author Jostein Gaarder published in 1993. The title is a phrase from the First Epistle to the Corinthians, one of the epistles by Paul the Apostle. The book won the author the Norwegian Booksellers' Prize for 1993, and has sold more than two million copies worldwide

Jostein Gaarder has created some unusual novels that manage to combine faith, philosophy, and fantasy

Jostein Gaarder has created some unusual novels that manage to combine faith, philosophy, and fantasy. Through a Glass, Darkly" is no different in that regard as its two main characters are Cecilia, a young girl dying of cancer, and Ariel, an angel who watches her. The novel is a series of conversations between the two as Ariel tries to understand what it is to be human and Cecilia has to come to terms with dying.

Through a Glass, Darkly book. Jostein Gaarder is a profoundly optimistic writer, who writes about death with wisdom, compassion and an enquiring mind

Through a Glass, Darkly book. It's almost Christmas  . Jostein Gaarder is a profoundly optimistic writer, who writes about death with wisdom, compassion and an enquiring mind. Through a Glass, Darkly' will not only bring comfort to the bereaved. It will move and amaze everyone who reads i. .

Jostein Gaarder has created some unusual novels that manage to combine faith, philosophy, and fantasy

Jostein Gaarder has created some unusual novels that manage to combine faith, philosophy, and fantasy.

Jostein Gaarder is a profoundly optimistic writer, who writes about death with wisdom, compassion and an enquiring mind. THROUGH A GLASS DARKLY will not only bring comfort to the bereaved. JOSTEIN GAARDER was born in Oslo in 1952. He is the author of many other bestselling, beloved novels and children's books. He lives in Oslo with his family. Библиографические данные. Through A Glass, Darkly.

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Conversations about life and death, between a girl and an angel. Cecilia lies sick in bed as her family bustle around her to make her last Christmas as special as possible.

Through a Glass, Darkly. Look into the Eye of Eternity at the Nether Vortex in the Nexus. After the dog is dead, Tarecgosa will break through the ice, and you will come into a room that is split in half by a huge chasm. Meet Tarecgosa inside the Nexus where she will escort you to the rift. There are several platforms with dragons on them - you have to use the small platform to kill the large dragons on the larger platforms surrounding them. Once you jump onto the large platform, you will notice 4 shadow-looking orbs on the platform.

Authors: Gaarder, Jostein. Through A Glass Darkly (Paperback). Publication Date: 01 April 1999. He is the author of many other bestselling, beloved novels and children's books, including The Orange Girl, The Christmas Mystery and The Ringmaster's Daughter.

  • I agree with what a previous reviewer said: this book missed the opportunity to discuss topics such as God, death, immortality, the meaning of life and human suffering. The basic idea is very touching: an angel visits a dying girl and engages her in a conversation (at times repetitive, as if Gaarder had run out of ideas concerning what an angel could or would say). The basic idea repeated over and over in the book is found in the title itself: we see reality as if through a glass, darkly (a quote from Paul's text 1 Cor 13:12). Being human has severe limitations: we will never be able to fully comprehend life, the universe, ourselves or even other people. Being an angel has limitations too: being incorporeal beings, they do not experience reality through the senses: hence, they do not know how to "feel" created realities and material bodies. The ending of the book is consoling: life continues after death.

  • Jostein Gaarder has created some unusual novels that manage to combine faith, philosophy, and fantasy. "Through a Glass, Darkly" is no different in that regard as its two main characters are Cecilia, a young girl dying of cancer, and Ariel, an angel who watches her. The novel is a series of conversations between the two as Ariel tries to understand what it is to be human and Cecilia has to come to terms with dying.

    Cecilia's family knows that she has little time left and with the approach of Christmas, they acquiesce to her wishes, including ridiculous presents like skis and a toboggan that she will most likely never use. Cecilia spends her days in bed, her mother or father hovering near, her only outlet a small notebook in which she records her thoughts. Imagine her surprise when one night she sees an angel sitting on her windowsill. The angel reveals himself to Cecilia because he knows that she has little time left on Earth and it is his job to comfort those whose time is near. But in exchange for telling the inquisitive Cecilia what Heaven and God are like, Ariel wants to know what it feels like to be human, for he can understand how things work but cannot feel them. Through their conversations, Gaarder paints an interesting picture of the God of creation and offers some questions about what happens after one dies.

    This book is written for a younger audience even if it covers heavier topics. Yet this is where I think Gaarder failed - for a book that deals with a dying girl there is almost too much talk of Earth and not enough of Heaven. Also, Ariel's penchant for repeating what Cecilia says, in order to try it out, and then having Cecilia record the very same thing in her notebook is repetitive. Perhaps this is meant to reinforce the concepts for younger readers, but for adult readers, this is a distraction. "Through a Glass, Darkly" is a quick easy read but it needs a little something more.

  • Reading "Through a Glass, Darkly" is like having a conversation with one's image in the mirror and learning that a whole other world exists on the other side of the glass. It's enough to make anyone's mind a little turvy-topsy, if you take my meaning.
    Here is an example of what to expect: At the beginning of the novel, Cecilia draws an angel on her windowpane with one of her tears--a tear angel. It makes her wonder if tear angels are the same as angel tears. Like I said, everything is turned downsideup . . . but it all still manages to make sense.
    The two main characters are a human girl named Cecilia and an angel from Heaven named Ariel. Cecilia is so ill that she cannot leave her bed, so Ariel comes to visit her on an angel watch. As he tells her things about Heaven, she tells him things about Earth; so this is really a conversation between an aspect of Heaven and an aspect of Earth. It so happens, Ariel tells Cecilia, that only angels and humans are able to wonder at themselves--to wonder at being able to wonder.
    The conflict in this story comes more from their dialogue than from the plot. If you like philosophy, then you'll love the way they toss ideas back and forth like a game of pong-ping. "Through a Glass, Darkly" is more mystical than "Sophie's World", however, and more poetic. In "Sophie's World" Jostein Gaarder toyed with everyone's world of knowledge, asking us how we can be sure we know what we think we know. In this novelette, he plays with the heady concept that we are all eyes of God, scattered throughout Creation: the mirrors the Creator uses to see Himself and all His works. A philosopher/astrologer named Alan Watts described this same concept as "God, playing hide-and-seek with Himself." (Or isn't it seek-and-hide?)
    This book is a lot like "Mr. God, This Is Anna" by Fynn. Part irreverent theology, part reverent heresy, "Through a Glass, Darkly" is so far-out that it speaks directly to what is close-in. Read it with an open mind and a young heart.

  • ...This book is less than 200 pages long, but in it packs life's greatest revelations.

    Cecelia, the book's central character, had been so sick in bed until she met an angel, Ariel. Ariel is a some kind of a missionary from Heaven. He's not fleash and blood like humans are and doesn't feel anything. He appears in front of Cecelia sometimes and when he does, you'll learn that there's a lot more than life (and death). From Ariel, anything can be so good that it hurts and anything so bad can actually be good. Ariel reminds Cecelia that human beings can only see one side of the mirror, and hence only read/see/feel/think one-sidely.

    When Cecelia eventually revels in the philosophical teachings of Ariel, she begins to understand that death is, in fact, a continuity of life somewhere else somehow. While reading the book, I came across so many thoughts that seem simple but never been reflected before. A very wise book that makes you think that extra mile, of life and love.