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ePub The Underground Man download

by Mick Jackson

ePub The Underground Man download
Author:
Mick Jackson
ISBN13:
978-0571236299
ISBN:
0571236294
Language:
Publisher:
Faber and Faber (2007)
Category:
Subcategory:
Contemporary
ePub file:
1283 kb
Fb2 file:
1682 kb
Other formats:
lit doc mbr txt
Rating:
4.2
Votes:
830

Further praise for The Underground Man: ‘What Jackson evokes with invention is the play of energy within His Grace’s lonely self-absorption: the strange . The Underground Man. Mick Jackson. From His Grace’s Journal.

Further praise for The Underground Man: ‘What Jackson evokes with invention is the play of energy within His Grace’s lonely self-absorption: the strange comedy and bravery of self-diagnosis.

He has author Mick Jackson's gifts of eloquence, to include strict observation of everybody's comings and goings and a. .The Underground Man' is a most unusual story.

He has author Mick Jackson's gifts of eloquence, to include strict observation of everybody's comings and goings and a deep empathy for Nature. He is sentimental and reflects poignantly on youth. This book had me sold early on, but I did wonder where it could be going.

A small gatehouse stood where each underground thoroughfare emerged, each with the word Lodge as a foundation.

The underground man, . A small gatehouse stood where each underground thoroughfare emerged, each with the word Lodge as a foundation. The map informed me how these lodges are currently occupied by Digby, Harris, Stoodle and Pyke, whose job it will be to lock and unlock the gates as necessary, to light the gaslights down their tunnel if word is received that they are to be used after dark and to ensure that no children get in.

The Underground Man book. As Mick Jackson paints him in this fictionalized biography, the Duke seems at first to be a painfully awkward, reticent man afflicted merely with an overabundance of imagination along with a raging case of hypochondria. In Victorian England those leanings could be fatal. The Duke’s early journal observations are beautiful, original and enticing.

Could not get anything done. I feel as if I have sprung a leak somewhere port. The pain which has been travelling up my body has emerged between my shoulder blades, which now clench together like pincers to try to squeeze the life out of it (an action over which I have not the slightest control). Last night I took a couple of the Reverend Mellor’s rheumatism pills. They looked and smelt like rabbit pellets and I imagine they did me about as much good.

The Underground Man. Based loosely on the life of the fifth duke of Portland, this is the story of an eccentric Victorian aristocrat who becomes increasingly frustrated by his own failing body and bewildered by the world around him. He commissions the construction of a labyrinth of tunnels an. He commissions the construction of a labyrinth of tunnels and slowly retreats into them. But as his body fails so a childhood memory gains power and clarity and he is haunted by the ghost of a young boy to such a degree that the duke finally feels his only option is to tunnel back to the source of his pain.

The Underground Man (1997) is a novel by Mick Jackson. Critically acclaimed, it was shortlisted for the Booker Prize for that year. It shows the life of an eccentric and reclusive Victorian Duke, loosely modelled on William inck, 5th Duke of Portland. His latest scheme involves building a set of tunnels beneath his estate. In 2016 it was adapted for the stage by Nick Wood for Nottingham Playhouse. Interview on bookmunch.

Mick Jackson does an excellent job of detailing the life of a truly eccentric, quirky man. I read this book in two days, but wished it had gone on many more. I laughed aloud many times and noticeably cringed while reading about his surgery

Mick Jackson does an excellent job of detailing the life of a truly eccentric, quirky man. I laughed aloud many times and noticeably cringed while reading about his surgery. People on the subway were straining to see what I was reading. Truly entertaining, extremely heartreaking. I can't wait for more from Mr. Jackson.

The Underground Man (Paperback). Mick Jackson (author) Please provide me with your latest book news, views and details of Waterstones’ special offers. Mick Jackson (author). One of the most acclaimed novels of recent times, The Underground Man is the fictionalised diary of a deeply eccentric English aristocrat. The duke has just completed a network of tunnels beneath his estate. His health is failing, but his imagination seems to know no bounds. Please provide me with your latest book news, views and details of Waterstones’ special offers. by. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

  • The Penguin Books paperback from 1998 has what could be my favorite book cover of all time.It is, however, an approximate depiction of the story, and the story is a murky depiction of the real life character on which it was based, William John Cavendish-Bentink-Scott. Let the creative license begin.

    Cavendish-Bentink-Scott, or the Duke, or your Grace, is introduced as an Emersonian, relate-able, sincere, a Romantic, and an old soul. Though not a religious one, a scientific one. He has author Mick Jackson's gifts of eloquence, to include strict observation of everybody's comings and goings and a deep empathy for Nature. He is sentimental and reflects poignantly on youth. This book had me sold early on, but I did wonder where it could be going.

    The story meanders. His Grace slowly is seen to fall behind the times, to have a bond of friendship with people who are too distant to be his friends. His royalty always serves him regarding his whimsy but it spoils him for developing the depth of kinship he does very well to internalize in his journal entries and, sometimes, with the eccentrics he may meet. The story meanders, but the character whose mental restlessness pushes and twists that story keeps it alive. This also occurs because of the "what now?" anticipation that has to seek a resolution somewhere.

    The tunnels are fascinating. The servants are uniquely tragicomic. The grounds and the residence are themselves a character. Eventually, the Edinburgh plot develops and sprouts a host of psychological options. You don't have to be crazy to appreciate the mortality in the tale. I just think you'd have to see yourself as a character flawed by age.

  • rather boring

  • Simply put, this is one of the most original novels I have ever read. The story, characters and setting make for a lush, quick read.

    I wish that Mick Jackson could bottle whatever creativity he used to create this world so he could do it again and again.

    Well worth the time.

  • Like a great meal you want over and over, this book delivers delight on 3 rd and 4th readings. Each time, I pick up something new. The prose is like poetry, and the images!-- God only knows from where this man conjured them. The subject itself is novel, but it is the writing that smacks the ball out of the park.
    If you love spellbinding writing, read this book.

  • I've read this book 2-3 times, several years ago and I still laugh when I think of certain passages. Must read again soon.

  • An utterly delightful novel. An elderly duke, alone in his cavernous mansion apart from a wealth of servants, ponders too deeply upon his every ache and pain. The attention he gives these is positively Proustian. Having infinite resources, he creates an underground to his home, avenues for all directions. Then he explores his domain - external and internal - to a point of no return. In the exploration he moves from intelligent curiosity, imaginative construction to eccentricity and near madness. His adventures take him to surprising and enriching places and people. Jackson has created an adorable character, gentle, feeling and loving who sadly has no family. The characters around the duke, and those he seeks out, are also created in a warm and loving writerly manner.
    The gentle amusement that furnishes the major portion of the novel gradually develops into a more tragic conception. What a wonderful read; one that is heart-warming and thought-provoking in equal measure. Beautiful writing.

  • 'The Underground Man' is a most unusual story. Apparently loosely based on a real person, it is about an aging aristocrat in Victorian England who slowly progresses/regresses from being an eccentric (likes to build many tunnels under his massive estate) to a real cuckoo (becomes delusional, and begins to engage into nasty mischief). And he seems to be obsessed with his (real? imagined?) failing health. His staff, while seeming unerringly loyal, struggle to keep up with him.

    While all this might sound a bit dull, the book is salvaged by some very sweet and compassionate writing. The dottering old coot is all alone and sad. The reader cannot help but care for him, much like his close servants. I was hoping that someone would come and offer true comfort to the old man. I will let future readers discover as to whether this actually happens.

    Bottom line: a sweet, sad story of aging and loneliness. Depressing? No. Recommended? Yes.

  • "The Underground Man" is the best book I've read all year! I don't know much about the real Duke of Portland or how historically accurate the book is, but as a character study, it is superb. It may not be for everyone--there are a few passages that might upset the very squeamish--but for those who like their fiction a bit "offbeat," it should be quite satisfying.

    Although the story is rather sad, the author's sense of humor helps mitigate the more tragic elements of the Duke's life. The part where he has stomach pain and tries to discover what is wrong is one of the funniest passages I've ever encountered in a book. I also enjoyed the bit about the "essence of beef," given to the Duke by a friend to help with his stomach troubles.

    The historical details impart a vivid sense of life and science in the 1800's, and the personal details make the very strange Duke seem very real.

    Outstanding!