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ePub Dark at Noon download

by Jill Tattersall

ePub Dark at Noon download
Author:
Jill Tattersall
ISBN13:
978-0893402716
ISBN:
0893402710
Language:
Publisher:
John Curley & Associates; Large type edition edition (November 1980)
Category:
Subcategory:
Contemporary
ePub file:
1158 kb
Fb2 file:
1616 kb
Other formats:
rtf lrf txt mobi
Rating:
4.1
Votes:
219

A coach plunges down a rugged ravine in northern Wales and a beautiful. Nov 19, 2017 Jennifer rated it really liked it. Shelves: 2017-reads, gothic, romance.

by. Tattersall, Jill. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. New York : W. Morrow. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china. t on October 4, 2011. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). Terms of Service (last updated 12/31/2014).

A tangled web, which Tattersall knots and unknots much more skillfully than in her last, Chanters' Chase. Pub Date: Dec. 11th, 1978. Questions? Call us! 88. 85.

This book does convey the feeling better than most 60's and 70's gothics that the hero is enamored of the heroine. In most gothics of that time you would be pretty surprised at the end that the hero had fallen in love with the heroine if you didn't know the formula. I thought the mystery was well done; it definitely kept my interest. The solution was logical and believable.

ISBN 10: 0449242110 ISBN 13: 9780449242117.

The format Tattersall uses in Time at Tarragon is reflective. We begin with Mary, the heroine, as a very old woman, receiving a tidbit of news that throws her into memories of the past

Find all the books, read about the author, and more. Are you an author? Learn about Author Central. Jill Tattersall (Author). The format Tattersall uses in Time at Tarragon is reflective. We begin with Mary, the heroine, as a very old woman, receiving a tidbit of news that throws her into memories of the past. At nineteen, she was orphaned, with nowhere to go except to an unwelcoming godmother as a lady's maid.

Самые новые твиты от jill tattersall (Tattersall). jill tattersall ретвитнул(а). Phid is on holiday‏ McAwesome 12 сент. 2018 г. Еще. Скопировать ссылку на твит. 0 ответов 2 ретвитов 5 отметок Нравится.

Dark at Noon (French: L'Œil qui ment, lit. The Eye that Lies) is a 1993 French-Portuguese comedy film directed by Chilean filmmaker Raúl Ruiz. It was entered into the 1992 Cannes Film Festival. The film portrays a surrealist world that Felicien, the protagonist played by Didier Bourdon, must navigate through as he seeks to learn what has become of his deceased father’s fortune.

  • This is a good vintage gothic involving amnesia (one of my favorite plot points).

    I’ve reread this book several times throughout the years and I obviously only do that with the well-written ones, by authors such as Mary Stewart and Victoria Holt.

    While this book is quite entertaining, my favorite book by this author is The Wild Hunt. Unfortunately, neither of these two books (or her others) are available in digital/ebook form. Hopefully that will change in the near future.

    This book is definitely a good choice for lovers of vintage gothic/romantic suspense.

  • 2 1/2 Stars
    'Dark Noon" started off well enough. There is a stagecoach accident where several people are killed. There are two young women on board, both in mourning clothes. One dies and the living one has amnesia, so she has no memory of who she is or why she was travelling. So the mystery is one of identity. Which woman was the ragpicker and which one the heiress? No one knows...well, SOMEONE knows...ooooh spooky

    Good stuff, right?

    Problem is that the book levelled off after the initial excitement. Not much else happens for about 70% of the book. Everyone wants to know who this girl is but she can't tell us cos she doesn't know herself. How frustrating! It was literally chapters of "Have you remembered anything yet?" "Sorry. No." "Maybe you're an adventurer, playing amnesia for the inheritance.." "Maybe I am. I really couldn't say.." ARRGHHHHHH

    The story picks up in the last 4 or 5 chapters where we have a scene in a tower, kidnapping and disguises and finally in the last chapter, the "Dickensian" reveal which every character in the book shows up for and all is made clear in a sort of cheesy fashion.

    This book is primarily a mystery; I couldn't call it romantic suspense because there isn't much of a romance at all. The lead male is a jerk through 98% of the book and the "sorry I was wrong" in the end did nothing to placate me though it seemed to suffice for the heroine.

    CONTENT:

    Sex: None
    VIOLENCE: Very Mild
    PROFANITY: None
    PARANORMAL ELEMENTS: None

    MY RATING G

  • Dark at Noon is probably my very favorite Jill Tattersall book. It's so very 70s. The opening scene is a carriage plunging over a steep embankment next to a swollen waterfall. In the wreckage below, there are two young ladies, both in mourning, both with brown hair, both alone. Only one lives, and the sunlight flashes on the signet ring as it slips off one of their fingers to rest on the sand below.

    Our heroine awakes, deep in Wales, and realizes that she does not know who she is. The ragpicker Mary Ramsey, a runaway apprentice come to Wales as a drudge for the only family she has? Or the quiet Victoria Merridew, inexplicably married several days earlier to the missing younger brother of the local Earl? There are papers in one reticule, tantalizingly damaged from their trip through the waterfall, that seem to be a record of marriage to, and a certificate of burial for, Gervais Marten.

    "Rose", she is called, until her memory should return. The shadows around her are deep and she hobbles, wounded, lonely and frightened, into the uncertain and uncomfortable life before her. There is no one she can trust except "Nanny Jones", the innkeepers wife, who nursed her in the beginning, and then sent Rose off to the castle with her previous charge, the Earl, Lucian Marten.

    Lord Castelmarten certainly does not trust Rose, and doesn't let the attraction he has for her sway his suspicion. But is she only an adventuress, out for Gerry's fortune? Or is she a murderer? While he dashes around between the castle in Wales, and Dunstable, Northamptonshire, where Merridew is known to have lived, Rose explores both the castle, and those who live in its sphere.

    Someone is leaving her warning notes to leave Wales. Someone has stolen the very documents which may prove her identity. Someone is trying to kill her. Are these people one and the same? Who is involved in this conspiracy? And what could it be about. Her memories are few: blackberries, sunlight through dust motes, scrubbing bloodstains off the floor....

    Will Rose's memory return before it's shut down for good?

  • This is an 70s gothic, so the romance is typically more implied rather than overt and is suspenseful just like the mystery part of the book. This book does convey the feeling better than most 60's and 70's gothics that the hero is enamored of the heroine. In most gothics of that time you would be pretty surprised at the end that the hero had fallen in love with the heroine if you didn't know the formula.
    I thought the mystery was well done; it definitely kept my interest. The solution was logical and believable. There were many clues along the way. Of course, the identity of the culprit is no real surprise, because the person seems a likely suspect. Still, you can't be sure, because there are other possibilities.
    The author did a good job delineating the characters, even the secondary ones. There are some you are not sure will be likeable, but, as the heroine gets to know them and like them so do you.
    The castle where much of the action takes place has a lot of gothic amenities, such as a keep only reached by a drawbridge by way of the main castle. There are several sets of spiral stairs behind hidden doors.

  • I love gothic romances and Jill Tattersoll is one of the best. This book was such an enjoyable read - the mystery was very engaging and for once I didn't skip to the back to see what happens. I wasn't thrilled with the "Scooby Doo" ending, where the bad guys tell the entire story to the protagonist just before they plan to get rid of her. Also, I can't figure out how the title of the book relates to the story at all? Still, I recommend this to all you gothic lovers out there.