mostraligabue
» » Wild Hunt

ePub Wild Hunt download

by Elizabeth Chadwick

ePub Wild Hunt download
Author:
Elizabeth Chadwick
ISBN13:
978-0750501118
ISBN:
0750501111
Language:
Publisher:
Magna Large Print Books; Large Print Ed edition (June 1991)
Category:
Subcategory:
Contemporary
ePub file:
1270 kb
Fb2 file:
1215 kb
Other formats:
rtf txt doc lrf
Rating:
4.3
Votes:
646

FREE shipping on qualifying offers

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Book by Elizabeth Chadwick. Chadwick's book marked my first introduction to the Welsh March Wars, but I've learned a lot about them over the years and revisiting the novel only heightens my admiration for her handling of the material. Most who read the book will remember the character drama, but the power struggle between Guyon and the other marcher lords is rather interesting if you've an interest in period politics.

My second novel and the sequel to The Wild Hunt.

The third book in the trilogy which follows on from The Wild Hunt and The Running Vixen. To save his inheritance, Guyon FitzMiles is forced into a marriage alliance with heiress Judith of Ravenstow. My second novel and the sequel to The Wild Hunt.

Elizabeth Chadwick is an author of historical fictions. She is a member of Regia Anglorum, a medieval reenactment organisation. Elizabeth Chadwick was born in Bury, Lancashire in 1957. She moved with her family to Scotland when she was four years old and spent her childhood in the village of Newton Mearns near Glasgow. She came to Nottingham when she was ten and has lived there ever since. She has told herself stories all of her life, but didn't actually write anything down until she was fifteen

Best selling historical novelist Elizabeth Chadwick won a Betty Trask Award for her first novel The Wild Hunt. Discover new books on Goodreads. See if your friends have read any of Elizabeth Chadwick's books.

Best selling historical novelist Elizabeth Chadwick won a Betty Trask Award for her first novel The Wild Hunt.

She could hear the murmur of voices as she approached, one deep and hesitant, the other her mother's and breathless. Then the voices ceased. At the curtain, Judith paused, warned by some sixth sense. that to clear her throat and just walk into the room would not be wise. Cautiously she drew aside the merest fold of material and peered within to assess whether she should go or stay. Set into the thickness of the wall, the room was tiny with space only for a bed, a small clothing pole and a brazier for use against the cold.

Поиск книг BookFi BookSee - Download books for free.

Publisher: Little, Brown Book Group, 2010.

Author: Elizabeth Chadwick. Publisher: Little, Brown Book Group, 2010. In the wild, windswept Welsh marches a noble young lord rides homewards, embittered, angry and in danger. He is Guyon, lord of Ledworth, heir to threatened lands, husband-to-be of Judith of Ravenstow. Their union will save his lands – but they have yet to meet.

The Wild Hunt ( Trilogy of Ravenstow - 1 ) Elizabeth Chadwick In the wild, windswept . by Elizabeth Chadwick. My first conscious memory of telling stories goes back to very early childhood.

The Wild Hunt ( Trilogy of Ravenstow - 1 ) Elizabeth Chadwick In the wild, windswept Welsh marches a noble young lord rides homewards, embittered, angry and in danger. Throughout my childhood I entertained myself by inventing stories, generally based on visual prompts from illustrations in books, or from memories of TV programmes I had enjoyed.

Heulwen, daughter of Welsh Marcher baron Guyon FitzMiles, has grown up with her father's ward, Adam de Lacey.

In the wild, windswept Welsh marches a noble young lord rides homewards, embittered, angry and in danger. Heulwen, daughter of Welsh Marcher baron Guyon FitzMiles, has grown up with her father's ward, Adam de Lacey. There has always been a spark between them, but when Heulwen marries elsewhere, to Ralf le Chevalier, a devastated Adam absents himself on various diplomatic missions for King Henry I. When Ralf is killed in a skirmish, Heulwen's father considers a new marriage for her with his neighbour's son, Warrin de Mortimer.

Wed to roguish Guyon, Lord of Ledworth, in order to protect both their lands from Judith's ruthless uncle, Judith of Ravenstow is at first terrified of the marriage bed, until Guyon shows her the pleasures of married life. Reprint.
  • I've read Elizabeth Chadwick's The Wild Hunt three times now and I love it as much today as I did when I first discovered it. As a teen, I was seduced by the romance between Guyon and Judith, but as an adult I find myself draw to the characters, atmosphere, politics, history and emotional conflict. Romance aside, there is a certain timelessness to the narrative that appeals on a variety of levels.

    Guyon's relationship with Judith might sound odd to some, but the pairing of a twenty-eight year old to a maid of sixteen was quite acceptable in the twelfth century and I like that Chadwick didn't shy from exploring the intricacies of that age gap. The novel spans four years and the emotions she illustrates in both hero and heroine are intensely authentic. The relationship ebbs and flows, it changes as the characters grow together and that really worked for me.

    Guyon's relationship Rhosyn is equally intriguing. Chadwick's treatment of the Welshwoman in downright captivating. On the surface, she is Judith's rival, a pebble in the boot of the Lady's marriage, but as a reader I couldn't help respecting Rhosyn's position and spirit. She is honest to herself, kind, generous, gentle, sensitive, accepting, practical and realistic. I liked that. Too often, authors paint the other woman in extreme shades, but I felt Chadwick's approach thought-provoking and appreciate how she handled Guyon's conflicting emotional allegiances without physical infidelity or blatant stereotyping.

    Several members of the supporting cast also caught my eye. The author had no cause to develop them as she did, but conflicts each faced over the course of the story added much to the fabric of the narrative. Eluned's childish infatuation and jealousy, Rhys' sense of possession and developing understanding of the world and Alicia's struggle for happiness both during and after her marriage pulled me further into the story. Each has an individual journey and I liked how their struggles played into the main story line.

    Chadwick's book marked my first introduction to the Welsh March Wars, but I've learned a lot about them over the years and revisiting the novel only heightens my admiration for her handling of the material. Most who read the book will remember the character drama, but the power struggle between Guyon and the other marcher lords is rather interesting if you've an interest in period politics. The novel touches on the death of William II and ascension of Henry I, but Chadwick's focus is definitely on the border violence that characterized the age.

    Atmospherically, I love this piece. There are a couple of words, treadmill for example, that stand out like sore thumbs, but for the most part the language and descriptions feel genuine to the era. Chadwick obviously understands the period and the lifestyles of those who lived in it. Folk remedies such as moldy bread are prominently depicted, but no one feigns to know why the treatment is effective and there are no undue hints that the concoction of bacteria on the aging crusts is in fact penicillin.

    Bottom line, The Wild Hunt is a wonderful book. Brilliant in both historic detail and fictional drama. Highly recommended.

  • I am a complete fan of Elizabeth Chadwick's books and have read most of them. Although this is the first book published by Elizabeth Chadwick and I did enjoy reading it, it was not one of her best. I would really give it 3.5 rather than 4. My taste runs to reading more historical content with a story interwoven. I found this one contained fewer historical events. I thought I was reading her books in published order, but it appears this is not the case. Therefore, I have been spoiled with her stronger works such as those concerning William Marshal - The Scarlet Lion, etc. Her research and expertise would have improved with experience and time and I think this book reflects that. Having said all of that, I was very happy to pick up this book and continue reading whenever I had the chance. Elizabeth Chadwick is an excellent writer.

  • This was not my favorite Elizabeth Chadwick book but still was a good read. It doesn't seem to be backed up by as much historical fact. It lacks the "Author's notes" which I have always enjoyed reading at the end of an Elizabeth Chadwick novel. It may be because this is one of her earlier books- copyright is 1990. It won't stop me from reading the other 2 novels of this trilogy.When Elizabeth Chadwick is good, she still is better than many writers best work.

  • I think this might be one of Elizabeth Chadwick's early books. It's based on a 'lay', which I suppose might be a story told by itinerant story-tellers in the Middle Ages? Anyway, although it is completely improbable, involving werewolves, it's a beautifully told love story which is both touching and scary - a good combination! I read it some time ago, and just writing about it now makes me want to read it again! I still remember how good it was, and how much I enjoyed it.

  • "The Wild Hunt" is, as far as I know, the first novel that Elizabeth Chadwick wrote (or published at the least.) As much as I love this author I have to say the lack of experience shows in this book.

    Like the vast majority of Chadwick's novels this is a romance inside of a historical fiction novel. The story here is of a son of a Welsh Marcher Barron (called so because their lands "march" with the borders of Wales) who is ordered by a slightly perverse (and as far as I know one of the at least three gay kings of England) to marry the heiress to great lands which are coveted by a very evil lord (her uncle.) Our lord (Guy) believes this ordered marriage to be tantamount to a death sentence because of the inevitable war he will have to fight with this uncle.

    His bride, Judith, is no more thrilled then he. Her father was brutal and her only images of marriage are very bad ones. She's terrified of her new husband; even though he makes it clear he won't consummate the marriage until she is ready (and older than her young minded sixteen years.) Also Guy is still n love with his pregnant Welsh mistress, who refuses to live with him or under his protection.

    So, political squabbling, sexual tension, family secrets and war ensue. Fairy typical Chadwick stuff really. The only difference is in the writing. This novel is nowhere near as polished and compelling as "The Conquest." It's still a good story, but there is so much emphasis on fighting and hunting that parts of it are downright boring. More romance would have been appreciated-most of Chadwick's books have really intense yearning involved with main characters and this did not, which removed a vital part of what makes her so good. But hey, practice makes perfect and Chadwick has since achieved that, so no worries.

    So in the end, if you're devoted to Chadwick, read the book. If you're just hearing of her now, don't start with this book. Read "The Conquest" instead-it's a much better showpiece of the author's talents.