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by Gaddis

ePub Agape Agape (Hc) download
Author:
Gaddis
ISBN13:
978-0805054705
ISBN:
0805054707
Language:
Publisher:
Henry Holt & Company (December 1997)
Category:
Subcategory:
Contemporary
ePub file:
1807 kb
Fb2 file:
1982 kb
Other formats:
mbr lrf lrf azw
Rating:
4.3
Votes:
469

Agapē Agape was written by Gaddis with the understanding that it would be his last published act as an author.

Agapē Agape was written by Gaddis with the understanding that it would be his last published act as an author. That crushing awareness of his own end is nearly palpable on every page. As a consequence, the writing is as deeply melancholic as it is directed. WILLIAM GADDIS (1922-1998) was twice awarded the National Book Award, for his novels J R and A Frolic of His Own. His other novels were The Recognitions and Carpenter’s Gothic; he was also the author of a collection of essays, The Rush for Second Place. He was a member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters and the recipient of a MacArthur Prize.

William Gaddis published four novels during his lifetime, immense and complex books that helped inaugurate a new movement in American letters.

William Gaddis published four novels during his lifetime, immense and. William Gaddis published four novels during his lifetime, immense and complex books that helped inaugurate a new movement in American letters. Now comes his final work of fiction, a subtle, concentrated culmination of his art and ideas. For more than fifty years Gaddis collected notes for a book about the mechanization of the arts, told by way of a social history of the William Gaddis published four novels during his lifetime, immense and complex books that helped inaugurate a new movement in American letters.

I picked up Agape Agape after hearing so much about William Gaddis as an author but having never read one of his books. It was also found on one of the earlier NY Times Notable Book lists. I would say that this book is the definition of why the NYT calls its list "notable" and not "best" as this was certainly not one of the best books I have ever read. Agape Agape was published after the death of Gaddis and includes an Afterword from Joseph Tabbi

His other novels were The Recognitions and Carpenter’s Gothic; he was also the author of a collection of essays, The Rush for Second Place.

His other novels were The Recognitions and Carpenter’s Gothic; he was also the author of a collection of essays, The Rush for Second Place. and the recipient of a MacArthur Prize. SVEN BIRKERTS is the author of My Sky Blue Trades, The Gutenberg Elegies, Readings, American Energies, and other books. He lives in Arlington, Massachusetts. For more than fifty years Gaddis collected notes for a book about the mechanization of the arts, told by way of a social history of the player piano in America. In the years before his death in 1998, he distilled the whole mass into a fiction, a dramatic monologue by an elderly man with a terminal illness.

Agapē Agape is a novel by William Gaddis. Published posthumously in 2002 by Viking with an afterword by Joseph Tabbi, Agapē Agape was Gaddis' fifth and final novel. It was published in Great Britain with the contents of The Rush for Second Place as Agapē Agape and Other Writings by Atlantic Books in 2004. Agapē Agape is written in a paragraphless, monophonic style strongly reminiscent of that of Austrian writer Thomas Bernhard, who is referred to in the book itself.

by. Gaddis, William, 1922-1998. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

Описание: Agapc Agape continues Gaddis& career-long reflection via the form of the novel on those aspects of corporate culture that are uniquely destructive of the arts

Описание: Agapc Agape continues Gaddis& career-long reflection via the form of the novel on those aspects of corporate culture that are uniquely destructive of the arts.

Gaddis completed Agape Agape just before his death

Gaddis completed Agape Agape just before his death. He has been writing it for 16 years, "like living with an invalid", he says

  • One of the more perceptive reviewers called this work a "diatribe". That, unfortunately, is exactly the case. It is not a novel; it is rather a string, a stream, a gushing forth of invective, of indignation, of hostility. No character development is possible here. No conflict is possible here. It is a rant. A rant by one of America's greatest novelists is still a rant. Mind, I agree with most of what angers the narrator (an obvious stand-in for Mr. Gaddis), but his entire argument could have been boiled down to three or four closely argued pages - instead we are inundated with references and allusions to philosophers from Plato to Nietzsche, to novelists from Flaubert to Tolstoy.
    I am a most ardent advocate of Gaddis the novelist, the genius who penned "The Recognitions," "JR," and "A Frolic of His Own". These works are masterpieces, artful masterpieces that addressed some of the same themes as this text does but in a dramatic, more indirect manner. This text, I am most sorry to admit, is a failure. In proposing a higher art form, a purer art form, Mr. Gaddis descends to the low, to the impure. If you are a fan of this genius, avoid this book.

  • Having never read Gaddis, but intrigued by the comparisons to several of my favorite authors (Joyce, Pynchon, etc) I decided to read him. Like many teachers putting forth _Dubliners_ or _A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man_ or _The Crying of Lot 49_ as the simpler, smaller books by a "great" author, I chose the shortest one. This book was written at the end of Gaddis's long life, and is the distillation of a lot of his themes and concerns and ideas that populated his earlier, more celebrated works. Apparently. Maybe I shouldn't have picked this book. It was only OK in my opinion. The stream of consciousness thing has been done before, and at times, I thought I was reading a book written in 1928, not 1998 because of the technique. The thing is, I couldn't really tell you what the book was "about." Its an interior rant about an old dying man who is hung up on the nature of art and technology really, but sometimes it made more sense on the page by page level than the global level. The writing and structure and vocabulary and reputation are enough to make me want to read more of his work, but I think I'll go read some Brits first.

  • Some people continue to read fiction while being utterly bored by it. I am one of them. I suspect Gaddis was bored too while being the brilliant writer that he was. Agape, agape was a surprise for me. I dared not hope I would love a novel (if you want to call it that) again. I laughed and wept, I marvelled and enjoyed. The vividness, the vitality of it when writer as well as protagonist were nearing death! What a wonderful homage to the miracle of being alive.
    You might say that only by breaking the novel to pieces can you make it interesting again - this book was pure emotion: so you might say, it is rather like a poem. "Do not go gently into that good night" - indeed.

  • Too much for me.

  • 5 stars

  • Have all his works and was always thought provoking

  • I picked up Agape Agape after hearing so much about William Gaddis as an author but having never read one of his books. It was also found on one of the earlier NY Times Notable Book lists. I would say that this book is the definition of why the NYT calls its list "notable" and not "best" as this was certainly not one of the best books I have ever read. Agape Agape was published after the death of Gaddis and includes an Afterword from Joseph Tabbi. The book is slim in nature and is largely focused on a man laying in bed dying and spewing out his final thoughts and words on the arts--specifically piano playing. The sentences jump from thought to thought similar to how a dying man must not be able to put many coherent words together. I found the book to be difficult to follow, uninteresting, and not something I can recommend to anyone else. I gave it two stars simply because it is entirely possible I didn't appreciate the real meaning of what Gaddis was trying to say--perhaps other may have greater success.
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