mostraligabue
» » The Great Bridge

ePub The Great Bridge download

by Nelson Runger,David McCullough

ePub The Great Bridge download
Author:
Nelson Runger,David McCullough
ISBN13:
978-1419363085
ISBN:
1419363085
Language:
Publisher:
Recorded Books (2006)
Category:
Subcategory:
Contemporary
ePub file:
1596 kb
Fb2 file:
1487 kb
Other formats:
txt mbr docx rtf
Rating:
4.5
Votes:
937

David McCullough's Triumphant Trilogy America's Eiffel Tower David McCullough Wishes He Had This Talent Historian David . More books from this reader: Nelson Runger. Thank you for signing up, fellow book lover! Tell us what you like, so we can send you books you'll love.

The Epic Story of the Building of the Brooklyn Bridge. Preface by David McCullough, Read by Nelson Runger. Unabridged Audio Download.

David McCullough (Author), Nelson Runger (Narrator), Simon . I don't think that the book did a great job of describing the how to part of building the bridge

David McCullough (Author), Nelson Runger (Narrator), Simon & Schuster Audio (Publisher) & 0 more. Best Sellerin Bridge Engineering. In this case McCullough takes us back to 19th century New York City, comparing and contrasting Manhattan and Brooklyn. He explains the initial impetus for a bridge over the East River to connect the 2 cities, how it would affect the lifestyles and economies of both cities. I don't think that the book did a great job of describing the how to part of building the bridge. I had seen a special on the history channel on building the bridge.

Christopher Lehmann-Haupt, The New York Times.

view Kindle eBook view Audible audiobook. Christopher Lehmann-Haupt, The New York Times. The Great Bridge is a great book. This is the definitive book on the event. Do not wait for a better try: there won't be an. -Norman Rosten, Newsday. The Great Bridge is a book so compelling and complete as to be a literary monument. McCullough has written that sort of work which brings us to the human center of the past.

Слушайте The Great Bridge (автор: David McCullough, Nelson Runger) бесплатно 30 дней в течении пробного .

Слушайте The Great Bridge (автор: David McCullough, Nelson Runger) бесплатно 30 дней в течении пробного периода. Слушайте аудиокниги без ограничений в веб-браузере или на устройствах iPad, iPhone и Android. This monumental book tells the enthralling story of one of the greatest accomplishments in our nation's history, the building of what was then the longest suspension bridge in the world. The Brooklyn Bridge rose out of the expansive era following the Civil War, when Americans believed all things were possible.

The Great Bridge: The Epic Story of the Building of the Brooklyn Bridge is a 1972 book about the construction of the Brooklyn Bridge written by popular historian David McCullough. It provides a history of the engineering that went into the building of the bridge as well as the toils John A. Roebling, the designer of the bridge, went through with his son Washington Roebling to bring the bridge to its completion.

McCullough, David G. The great bridge. New York: Simon and Schuster, 1972. WHEN I began this book I was setting out to do something that had not been done before. I wanted to tell the story of the most famous bridge in the world and in the context of the age from which it sprang. The Brooklyn Bridge has been photographed, painted, engraved, embroidered, analyzed as a work of art and as a cultural symbol; it has been the subject of a dozen or more magazine articles and one famous epic poem; it has been talked about and praised more it would seem than anything ever built by Americans.

Bridge, the world?s longest suspension bridge at the time, a tale of greed, corruption, and obstruction but also of optimism, heroism, and determination

Bridge, the world?s longest suspension bridge at the time, a tale of greed, corruption, and obstruction but also of optimism, heroism, and determination. com/?book 1501189077.

David Mccullough or Brooklyn caisson for New . .

Narrated by Nelson Runger. The dramatic and enthralling story of the building of the Brooklyn Bridge

THE GREAT BRIDGE The Epic Story of the Building of the Brooklyn Bridge. Everything we ever wanted to know about the building of the Brooklyn Bridge is in this book, and we should be thankful for that.

THE GREAT BRIDGE The Epic Story of the Building of the Brooklyn Bridge. by David McCullough Read by Nelson Runger. This is the kind of good, solid history that both informs and enlightens. Narrator Nelson Runger does an excellent job with this mammoth work.

McCullough tells the captivating narrative of the history of the 14-year construction of the Brooklyn Bridge (1869-1883). Read by the marvelous Nelson Runger.
  • I mostly enjoyed this book, especially the first quarter and the last quarter. It is meticulously researched and as always, McCullough does a great job putting you in to the time period he is documenting.

    In this case McCullough takes us back to 19th century New York City, comparing and contrasting Manhattan and Brooklyn. He explains the initial impetus for a bridge over the East River to connect the 2 cities, how it would affect the lifestyles and economies of both cities.

    The book is covering an exciting time in America when large engineering projects were being accomplished which would lay an infrastructure which made the 20th century economy possible. He covers other bridge builders and their projects notably the Eads bridge over the Mississippi.

    As a lot of people know the Roebling family sacrifices made the Brooklyn bridge possible. Mccullough
    covers the life of German born Joeseph Roebling an educated engineer who emigrated to Pennsylvania and founded a community of Germans. After about a decade however Roebling went back into engineering and began a series of high profile suspension bridges, notably Roebling bridge in Cincinnati and a railroad bridge over the Niagara river.

    When Roebling began work on the Brooklyn bridge his son was his main assistant – Washington Roebling. Unfortunately after his foot was injured in an on the job accident, Joeseph Roebling contracted gangrene and died. His son had to take over as the main engineer for the bridge and he accomplished it by using caissons to sink the foundation of the towers. At that time the medical issues associated with working in pressures greater than one atmosphere were not well understood. Washington Roebling basically sacrificed his life due to his becoming chronically ill from having worked in the caissons and suffering the bends repeatedly. He was bedridden for years, but still managed to manage the project from his home in Brooklyn.

    There were some drawbacks to this book, mostly in the middle parts of it. I don't think that the book did a great job of describing the “how to” part of building the bridge. I had seen a special on the history channel on building the bridge. Without that I don't think the book would have made clear what was involved in the caissons and “spinning the wire” . Also the book gets a little bogged down in the politics behind building the bridge, the graft and corruption involved.

    Overall though this was a good book to help you understand what went into building a great American landmark.

  • Do not buy the Kindle edition! Like others have stated, this book has lengthy, detailed descriptions that are hard to follow even by those with engineering experience. I believe the paper version has diagrams that may bump this book up to a 4-star rating for me. This was my first time reading a David McCullough book, and I appreciated the history of the bridge's construction which was clearly thoroughly researched. I could have done with a little less about the political and social history that was only loosely related to the building of the bridge. Those long, droning chapters could have easily been condensed and made the book much more focused and easier to get through. Overall, an OK read.

  • Having just read McCullough's far breezier "The Wright Brothers" and being at a year's distance from his wonderful book about John Adams, I had to make a few adjustments in my head to get into the rhythm and level of detail contained in "The Great Bridge." I often wonder how Mr. McCullough has the wherewithal to track down the seemingly endless details about his subject matter and then turn everything into a compelling story. Whatever his process, he succeeds magnificently in writing about the Brooklyn Bridge. Every politician, crook (is that redundant?), engineer, onlooker and more are woven together into a tale almost as expansive and astounding as the physical bridge itself. They didn't have electronic design tools back then but oh how people like John Roebling and his son Washington and Washington's wife Emily (come to think of it, were there any like them?) could envision a massive structure that would not only change the flow of commerce forever but create a lasting piece of mega-art. McCullough is a national treasure on a par with any of the grand subjects he trains his attention on. My only criticism is that given all the technical details provided, the reader would be better served by a fuller set of drawings of the bridge and its major components. A little too much is left to the reader to try to visualize. That said, the photos are wonderful and if one has the time to devote to absorbing as opposed to merely reading this book, it will pay off for a lifetime. As an aside, the last chapter ("The People's Day") and the epilogue are stunning, well worth on their own the price of the book and investment of the reader's time.

  • I absolutely liked this book. Took me two years to read it. I have it on my Kindle. I could underline what was interesting and look up words. Look people up. Totally fantastic. One of my favorite books. I even went to the library and checked out the hard copy to see the pictures. Lot's of footnotes. You won't regret reading this book. I put book down a few times to read other books. I even checked books about the Roblings, Boss Tweed, and then some including the Presidents when the bridge was built. or other political figures back then. I figured my great great grandfather John probably worked on the bridge at one time or other. My family is from NYC. I have walked over this bridge.