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ePub The Rebel Angels download

by Robertson Davies

ePub The Rebel Angels download
Author:
Robertson Davies
ISBN13:
978-0140118605
ISBN:
0140118608
Language:
Publisher:
Penguin Books Ltd (June 29, 1989)
Category:
Subcategory:
Contemporary
ePub file:
1962 kb
Fb2 file:
1517 kb
Other formats:
lrf lit doc azw
Rating:
4.5
Votes:
347

ROBERTSON DAVIES (1913–1995) was born and raised in Ontario, and was educated at a variety of schools .

ROBERTSON DAVIES (1913–1995) was born and raised in Ontario, and was educated at a variety of schools, including Upper Canada College, Queen’s University, and Balliol College, Oxford. He had three successive careers: as an actor with the Old Vic Company in England; as publisher of the Peterborough Examiner; and as university professor and first Master of Massey College at the University of Toronto, from which he retired in 1981 with the title of Master Emeritus.

Davies weaves together the destinies of this remarkable cast of characters, creating a wise and witty portrait of love, murder, and scholarship at a modern university. accomplishes the task of preserving this restless story with a flowing narration

Davies weaves together the destinies of this remarkable cast of characters, creating a wise and witty portrait of love, murder, and scholarship at a modern university. accomplishes the task of preserving this restless story with a flowing narration.

The Rebel Angels is Canadian author Robertson Davies's most noted novel, after those that form his Deptford Trilogy. First published by Macmillan of Canada in 1981, The Rebel Angels is the first of the three connected novels of Davies' Cornish Trilogy. It was followed by What's Bred in the Bone (1985), and The Lyre of Orpheus (1988). It did not quite attain the popularity of the Deptford Trilogy.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. As new. Dust jacket in Mylar (pristine condition). Robertson Davies' writing is so retro he's cool again! Canadian academicians and Anglican priests tangle over a newly discovered original text by Rabelais (and over a beautiful and brilliant grad student, to a lesser extent). Sure, it's a little pretentious, but it's also funny, bawdy, thought-provoking, and kind of romantic.

I was returning to North America by way of England, where I had to pick up some things I had left – books of my trade, principally – and in London there was another cable: Henry was dead

I was returning to North America by way of England, where I had to pick up some things I had left – books of my trade, principally – and in London there was another cable: Henry was dead. No explanation, but when I found out what had happened it was plain enough that he had done for himself. This was desolating, but not utterly desolating.

The Rebel Angels book. Neither author nor narrator are still living but have left us their gifts.

Robertson Davies (1913-1995) was born and raised in Ontario, and was educated at a variety of schools, including Upper Canada College, Queen's University, and Balliol College, Oxford

Robertson Davies (1913-1995) was born and raised in Ontario, and was educated at a variety of schools, including Upper Canada College, Queen's University, and Balliol College, Oxford.

Robertson Davies - Rebel Angel. 2 people like this topic.

Author: Robertson Davies. Publisher: Penguin Group, New York, 1983. Robertson Davies uses his magical touch to weave together the destinies of this remarkable cast of characters, creating a wise and witty portrait of love, murder, and scholarship at a modern university.

Robertson Davies uses his magical touch to weave together the destinies of this remarkable cast of characters, creating a wise and witty portrait of love, murder, and scholarship at a modern university

Robertson Davies uses his magical touch to weave together the destinies of this remarkable cast of characters, creating a wise and witty portrait of love, murder, and scholarship at a modern university. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

A goodhearted priest and scholar, a professor with a passion for the darker side of medieval psychology, a defrocked monk, and a rich young businessman who inherits some troublesome paintings are all helplessly beguiled by the same coed. Davies weaves together the destinies of this remarkable cast of characters, creating a wise and witty portrait of love, murder, and scholarship at a modern university.
  • Robertson Davies' writing is so retro he's cool again! Canadian academicians and Anglican priests tangle over a newly discovered original text by Rabelais (and over a beautiful and brilliant grad student, to a lesser extent). Sure, it's a little pretentious, but it's also funny, bawdy, thought-provoking, and kind of romantic. And did I mention Gypsies? After reading the Deptford Trilogy in the 1980s, I'm glad to be able to escape back into the wonderful language and joie de vivre of this great author.

  • Well if you're well-read and Canadian, chances are you know of this wonderful author. These books are from the 1970's I believe, my Mom had them all and got me interested. She bought mostly from book stores back in the day.

  • The Rebel Angels immediately entered my personal canon of favorite works of literature. Could it be the perfect novel? It features astounding characters, well defined and memorable (especially the unforgettable John Parlabane, almost as singular a character as Liesl in Davies' Deptford Trilogy). It features a page turning plot. I was initially hoping for a literary mystery, along the lines of Eco, when the "lost manuscript" is introduced. The plot doesn't exactly lead that way, but creates its own twists and turns, both comic and tragic.
    Davies' fine novel is an erudite display of knowledge, philosophy, emotion. There are no blacks and whites, nor even shades of grey. Each character is peppered alternately both black and white...each an incredibly real person encompassing friendship and selfishness, good and evil.
    This is the kind of novel you feel better for having read. It impressed me on each page; a great work of literature as well as a very enjoyable read.

  • Robertson Davies is just a charming wonderful writer and it feels very luxurious to read about 1970's Canadian academia. I never did read Davies when I was young. The next two books in this Cornish Trilogy were much more popular. Can't wait to read them also.

  • I loved this book in high school, but I'd given away my copy to a boyfriend. I'm happy to finally have another copy to dive into again.

  • I’m not really sure how I feel about Rebel Angels, to be honest. This novel is a literary contemporary that focuses on two main characters within a Canadian university — a professor and a student. It explores the meaning of academia, what it means and what it contributes; the value of success, what success looks like, and how the definition of success changes based on what group you’re involved with; and, what relationships are meant for, what they mean, and how we’re supposed to go about them.

    Basically, it wanders through a whole lot of complex ideas and tries to make sense of them. They’re interesting in and of themselves, but the book does feel like it meanders through the story because of the philosophical ideas that it takes on. I didn’t hate it, but I also didn’t love it. I found quite a few of the topics incredibly interesting — the student main character (Maria), for instance, is a gypsy who is trying to cast off her heritage and make a name for herself in academia, and having that culture talked about through her point of view is fascinating (I want to learn more!). The other main character I found somewhat boring, but he provides the foil to Maria’s young, brown, female character to give the more common perspective of the older white man.

    If you’re into academic, literary writings, then this is for you. It provides a lot of food for thought and tons of stuff for analysis and contemplation. This is the opposite of a light, fun summer read — this is an undertaking (and it has sequels!). It has its dramatic points but it feels like it’s mostly written for the ideas and philosophies it explores.

  • Civilization rests on two things: the discovery that fermentation produces alcohol, and voluntary ability to inhibit defecation.

    University life at its most eccentric. Two alternating narrators lead us into abysses of academe. One narrator is a beautiful young multilingual woman, who does post-graduate work on Rabelais, and is in love with her professor, the other a Reverend and Professor, who wants to write portraits of his illustrious colleagues, which leads him into the middle of events.

    Stars of the show are quite a few. Main mover is a wayward monk, a skeptical philosopher, a former genius, now a philanderer, a gay foul mouth, called Parlabane. The name is explained as an Irish adaptation of Parlebiens, a good talker. Sharp talk runs in his genes. We would call him a be-esser. A kind of latter day Mephisto.
    Another cast member is a former football star who does anthropological studies on correlation between human physical type and aspects of fecal output. Seriously.
    And what about our narrating beauty's widowed mother, an eccentric Hungarian gypsy, owner of secrets of lore, a Frankenstein of string instruments.

    The story is set in a barely veiled Toronto university, fondly nicknamed Spook for its holy name invoking the Holy Ghost. The novel carries so many frivolous and obscure subjects, that one almost forgets about plot. The plot re-surfaces a bit like an afterthought, with the mission to wrap things up. We are served a stolen manuscript, uncomfortable sexual games, a murder, a suicide, and a solution to the 'who gets the girl' that can be seen coming from miles away.

    I bought this book at least 25 years ago, and never read it. It somehow managed to hide in my shelf. Preparing for a flight to Toronto, I packed it and found it an appropriate companion. Wickedly amusing, but not a quick read. Quite likable, but hardly lovable, due to an overload of biblical and Faustian allusions and meaning.