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ePub Be Near Me download

by Andrew O'Hagan

ePub Be Near Me download
Author:
Andrew O'Hagan
ISBN13:
978-0571216024
ISBN:
0571216021
Language:
Publisher:
Faber and Faber; First edition (2006)
Category:
Subcategory:
Contemporary
ePub file:
1825 kb
Fb2 file:
1194 kb
Other formats:
txt lit rtf lrf
Rating:
4.1
Votes:
550

Andrew O'Hagan was born in Glasgow in 1968. His first book, The Missing, was published in 1995 and shortlisted for the /Apple Non-Fiction Award. Our Fathers, his debut novel, was shortlisted for the 1999 Booker Prize

Andrew O'Hagan was born in Glasgow in 1968. Our Fathers, his debut novel, was shortlisted for the 1999 Booker Prize. His second novel, Personality, was published in 2003 and won the James Tait Black Memorial Prize for Fiction.

Be Near Me. Andrew O'Hagan. HARCOURT, INC. Orlando Austin New York. San Diego Toronto London. No part of this publication may be reproduced. or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording, or any information storage and. retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher. Requests for permission to make copies of any part of the work.

Be Near Me possesses a depth of feeling and a literary artistry that render it O’Hagan’s masterpiece. In this riveting novel, where every word counts, Andrew O’Hagan’s brilliant writing leads us into a story of art and politics, love and faith

Be Near Me possesses a depth of feeling and a literary artistry that render it O’Hagan’s masterpiece. In this riveting novel, where every word counts, Andrew O’Hagan’s brilliant writing leads us into a story of art and politics, love and faith. Be Near Me possesses a depth of feeling and a literary artistry that render it O’Hagan’s masterpiece.

Longlisted for the Booker Prize, Andrew O'Hagan's Be Near Me is a brilliantly moving story of art and politics, love and change, and the way we live now. See all Product description

Everyday low prices on a huge range of new releases and classic fiction. Longlisted for the Booker Prize, Andrew O'Hagan's Be Near Me is a brilliantly moving story of art and politics, love and change, and the way we live now. See all Product description. The Missing Paperback. The Atlantic Ocean: Essays on Britain and America Paperback. Always trust a stranger," said David's mother when he returned from Rome. It's the people you know who let you down

Be Near Me. It's the people you know who let you down. Half a life later, David is Father Anderton, a Catholic priest with a small parish in Scotland. But their friendship also ignites the suspicions and smoldering hatred of a town that resents strangers, and brings Father David to a reckoning with the gathered tensions of past and present. In this masterfully written novel, Andrew O'Hagan explores the emotional and moral contradictions of religious life in a faithless age.

In this masterfully written novel, Andrew O’Hagan explores the emotional and moral contradictions of religious life in a faithless ag. .

Andrew O'Hagan, FRSL (born 1968) is a Scottish novelist and non-fiction author. O'Hagan is currently the Visiting Professor of Writing at King's College London. Three of O'Hagan’s novels have been nominated for the Booker Prize for Fiction. He was selected by the literary magazine Granta for inclusion in their 2003 list of the top 20 young British novelists.

The Mammoth Book of Air Disasters and Near Misses.

I could hear voices downstairs, the voice of my mother, my father saying something in reply, the kitchen cupboards opening and closing. s ears taking in the cold and took him down from the ledge. My mother brought a hot-water bottle and she kissed the tips of my fingers: that was our code for going to sleep. Something then like roasting chicken and a voice on the radio talking about Berlin, the sound of my parents laying down cutlery.

Be Near Me opens with two such conversations. The first is between a younger Anderton, the narrator, and his mother, a lady novelist who dispenses to her son an odd but intriguing piece of advice: Always trust a stranger, she tells him in premonitory tones. O’Hagan has a second extraordinary gift - the evil twin, in a way, of his touch with a learned conversation: with a cool diagnostic precision, he understands how a crowd can march in lockstep up the terraces of its own hysterical indignation.

Be Near Me
  • Andrew O'Hagan's wonderful novel is written against the well-known trope implied by my title. A Catholic priest comes to a depressed village where Mass attendance is down, and many of the inhabitants seem to be hostile, but gradually, by the conscientious performance of his office, he.... But no. Written against the trope, I said, not within it. Although there is no doubt about Father David Anderton's commitment to God, his commitment to humdrum pastoral duties is less total. And Dalgarnock, the community where he is sent on the Ayrshire coast, southwest of Glasgow, is no picturesque rural hamlet. It is a place of endemic boredom inhabited mainly by workers laid off from shuttered factories, now unable to find work. It is also a town where Protestant/Catholic rivalries are waged almost as fiercely as they are in Northern Ireland, just a few miles over the water. And Father David, though born in Edinburgh, was educated and worked in England, so he is despised by both parties as the worst thing of all, a foreigner.

    And indeed he is not one of this community. He is the product of an exclusive education (Ampleforth, Balliol, and Rome), a man of cultured tastes (classical music, literature, and fine wine), and the funds to enjoy them. All the same, he does seem to have a gift for making contact with those of very different circumstances. In an early chapter, we see him teaching a remedial class at the local comprehensive school, and somehow turning the foul-mouthed (and well-nigh incomprehensible) responses of these fifteen-year-olds into a real teachable moment. Indeed, he begins to spend time with a couple of them, Mark and his girlfriend Lisa, rejuvenated by their youth and stimulated by the contrast with his own life of taste and decorum. And although we don't yet know how, it is clear that these contrasts will eventually get him into trouble.

    All the way through the novel, there are flashbacks to various episodes from his youth, including one in which he arrives at a picnic at his boarding school riding on a circus elephant. But none is as significant -- or perhaps as incomprehensible to the non-initiate -- as that describing his undergraduate years at Balliol College, Oxford. There, he falls in with a group of well-heeled aesthetes making a game of quoting Proust at each other and bibbing rare wines. But then he is drawn into almost the opposite world: that of solidarity with the left-wing protest movements of the sixties, taking arms against imperialist fascism in all its forms. He also falls gloriously and tragically in love. We come to see that these are the still-unresolved dichotomies being fought out in him at Dalgarnock thirty years later.

    One of the remarkable things about the book is the way you never lose sympathy for the central character, even as your moral assessment of him changes and changes again. There is a wonderful dinner he gives later in the book for his bishop (an old friend from Rome) and some local clergy, one of whom is gauchely out of place in this suave gathering. The discussion turns to Iraq (this is 2004 or so). David's views are disturbingly different from those he held as a Vietnam protester, and it is left to the odious oddball to make the points that I think most readers will agree with; I found my social and moral sympathies being torn most interestingly in two opposite directions. The other example I would cite is Father David's relationship with his housekeeper, Mrs. Poole, an autodidact and traditional Catholic who often seems more concerned with pastoral matters than the priest himself. Behind their verbal duels and awkward friendship may lurk a search for true spirituality. All in all, a deep, complex, and highly satisfying novel.

  • This is the third book by O'Hagan that I have read. I think he is a great writer. This one tells of a priest who is transferred to a small town in Scotland and who becomes a victim of his own frailties. He became a priest after a tragedy occurs that he doesn't know how to deal with. He turns to the protection of the Church. He is also in love with youth and his memories of it. When he becomes involved in helping the young people in the parish it is a recipe for disaster. And it happens. The town turns on him and once again he has lost all that mattered to him. O'Hagan draws a portrait of this man who is at once sympathetic and maddeningly weak and naïve. The people of the town are beautifully articulated. I would recommend this one.

  • Father David Anderton is an English Catholic priest in a predominantly Protestant provincial Scottish town. He is also a gay intellectual in a place that, for the most part, has little or no interest in or tolerance for either characteristic. Father David's natural aloofness from his parishioners and long-term ambivalence about his profession lead to growing alienation and a walk on the wild side as he begins a friendship with two teenage slackers dealing with their own social disconnections. The relationship between the middle-aged priest and one of the teenagers--a 15-year old male--inevitably leads to a big trouble and a life crisis for the former.

    Author Andrew O'Hagan brings some wonderful characters to this story and writes knowingly of living with regret for choices made early in life--some resulting from the trauma of deep loss, some seemingly completely logical and normal. Above all, this novel is redolent with language that is exquisitely expressive and evocative. This is a wonderful, if rather sad, novel that still hints at a kind of redemption by its ending..

  • This novel was recommended highly in Commonweal and I wasn't disappointed. O'Hagen very carefully and successfully gets into the psyche of a very lonely Catholic priest in a hostile environment who doesn't have much insight into himself and subsequently finds himself in trouble. The front piece quotes Father David's mother as saying,"You can always trust strangers, it is those you know that you can't trust." This is true not only with those who betray David, but with David himself. He has so little self-knowledge that his biggest enemy turns out to be himself. Although the writing is beautiful, the story is so painful that it doesn't result in any redemption for David or the reader. A well-written book but be prepared to be depressed while you witness a character who seems to have lost so much by not examining and being himself.

  • Really disliked this book. Had no interest in the characters. Didn't finish the book as I felt there were a lot better ways to spend my time.

  • Haunting, beautifully written, and terribly sad, this timely, and some would say timeless, story of an English priest who becomes involved with two young people and what happens in the Scottish town had me riveted. O'Hagen's writing feels resonant of something by E.M. Forster, and in fact almost evocative of "Maurice".

  • I can not think of another kind of praise for my enjoyment in this book. While the kid's talk seemed harsh, all else moved smoothly. This type of prose is not my normal reading style. However, this theme was handled beautifully. Thanks.

  • This book left me completely puzzled. Why, I asked myself, juxtapose seeming poetic expressions with punk dialogue? Why take what starts out as a beautiful thought and end it with a word that makes it so vague it becomes irrelevant. I found the main character totally incredible. I couldn't understand why he is a priest or why he acts as he does. Supposedly it's because of his past. It all seemed like a pretentious excuse to me. Yet the secondary characters are sharply drawn and palpably human. Obviously the author has great talent, but I suspect he shot himself in the foot trying to be too clever by half. No wonder he writes for the New York Review of Books.