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ePub Accident: A Day's News download

by R. Takvorian,H. Schwarzbauer,Christa Wolf

ePub Accident: A Day's News download
Author:
R. Takvorian,H. Schwarzbauer,Christa Wolf
ISBN13:
978-1853810299
ISBN:
1853810290
Language:
Publisher:
Virago Press Ltd (April 24, 1989)
Category:
Subcategory:
Contemporary
ePub file:
1588 kb
Fb2 file:
1119 kb
Other formats:
docx doc azw lrf
Rating:
4.1
Votes:
980

The book Accident: A Day’s News: A Novel, Christa Wolf is published by University of Chicago Press. Accident/ A Day’s News Translator’s Notes.

The book Accident: A Day’s News: A Novel, Christa Wolf is published by University of Chicago Press. You may purchase this title at these fine bookstores. Outside the USA, see our international sales information. Chicago Blog: Literature. Events in Literature.

Accident: A Day's News is a strange and fascinating little novel. Accident takes place on a single day shortly after the Chernobyl atomic plant disaster. An East German writer (much like Christa Wolf) goes about her day. Our narrator (never named, though intimated to be Christa Wolf herself) waits for a call to tell her how her brother's brain surgery went, while ruminating on the recent nuclear disaster at Chernobyl. As she goes about her daily business, gardening, shopping, answering her mail, she contemplates humanity, and human responsibility. Imagining the details of her brother's surgery she juxtaposes it with the spreading nuclear crisis.

Accident/A day's news. Trs. Heike Schwarzbauer and Rick Takvorian. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 1989. Pp. 113. Antonia H. Fore (a1).

ACCIDENT/A DAY'S NEWS, by Christa Wolf. Translated by Heike Schwarzbauer and Rick Takvorian

ACCIDENT/A DAY'S NEWS, by Christa Wolf. Translated by Heike Schwarzbauer and Rick Takvorian. On an otherwise ordinary day, Chernobyl explodes and an East German writer worries about her brother, who is undergoing surgery for a brain tumor. In this powerful, brooding and often surprisingly lyrical novel, Christa Wolf avoids both sensationalism and pamphleteering," Eva Hoffman said in The Times in 1989.

Christa Wolf's Accident, A Day's News is a unique view into the mind of the narrator and main character (the German Writer) as she experiences a single day of personal and community crisis

Christa Wolf's Accident, A Day's News is a unique view into the mind of the narrator and main character (the German Writer) as she experiences a single day of personal and community crisis. On a personal level, the writer is struggling through the brain surgery of her brother, who lives far away and with whom she "speaks" to throughout the narrative. Intertwined in that personal crisis is a worldwide concern regarding the after-effects of the Chernobyl Nuclear Accident. There is great struggle for the writer as she attempts to navigate this new world, with its warnings about milk and vegetables, and the fear of the great storm cloud that threatens to rain down deadly radiation on all.

Daniel Mendelsohn and Eve Babitz Longlisted for lvogel Award for the Art of the Essay

The eight heartfelt stories in the book show why she has been respected as a serious author since her 1968 novel, The Quest for Christa . .

The eight heartfelt stories in the book show why she has been respected as a serious author since her 1968 novel, The Quest for Christa .Wolf uses her own experiences and observations to create universal themes about the controls upon human freedom. ?”Herbert Mitgang, New York Times Christa Wolf has set herself nothing less than the task of exploring what it.

HEIKE SCHWARZBAUER and RICK TAKVORIAN have collaborated on two translations of books by the German literary critic and novelist Christa Wolf, Accident: A Day’s News and What Remains and Other Stories. She is based in Hamburg, Germany. Michael Ende, The Night of Wishes.

Same Every Day Low Prices. Christa Wolf; Heike Schwarzbauer; Rick Takvorian. This button opens a dialog that displays additional images for this product with the option to zoom in or out. Tell us if something is incorrect. Accident: A Day's News : A Novel.

ACCIDENT A Day's News By Christa Wolf Translated from the German By Heike Schwarzbauer and Rick Takvorian Farrar, Straus & Giroux. That's a central question Christa Wolf poses in "Accident," and certainly events such as Chernobyl and Three Mile Island testify to its pertinence.

This novel contemplates the connection between destruction and desire and is written by the author of "The Quest for Christ T." and "No Place on Earth".
  • Accident: A Day's News is a novella that is a very in depth reading of one's consciousness that seems to provide any and all thoughts and emotions felt over one particular day in which a writer is waiting anxiously for news about her brother undergoing brain surgery while at the same time hearing the news that a nuclear cloud is contaminating European milk and vegetables. This particular author uses scientific terminology throughout the novel relating the brain surgery that the brother is under going to the realistic thoughts of the writer. This novel would be particularly hard to follow for someone who can't open their imagination enabling to grasp the hidden plot through the streaming of consciousness of the writer. One reading this type of novel may seem overwhelmed by the constant psychological shift of the analysis of the actual brain surgery and then relating it to each event throughout the day. Throughout the novel a sense of a human's capacity for destruction is mentioned in almost every paragraph. The German writer speaks to hear brother through her thoughts, which makes them hard to follow the meaning behind them because every thought or emotion leads to another action of the day which never seems to have a full grasp of what is happening.
    The author uses the brain surgery that the brother is undergoing and each cut of the knife and depth into the brain of her brother's diseased tissue as a question for each section they cut through against her existence of her own life. The author takes you through each detailed moment of the women's accounting of the day such as when she analyzed the zucchini plants growing in her garden, "Seventeen seedlings in right pots" (p 33). She tried to analyze the growth of the plant, which she could not understand. She asked herself "Why did it mean so much to me that the zucchini had sprouted" (p 33)... The tone expressed throughout the novel has a sense of darkness and the fear of mortality. This type of novel would be better read by someone who enjoys the scientific knowledge and nuclear science and medicine. I would suspect that this type of read is for someone who can read between the lines and have the ability to follow. I believe that this novel is geared more towards the older generation and not the younger generation as there is a lot of depressing emotions tied to the thoughts.

  • Christa Wolf's Accident, A Day's News is a unique view into the mind of the narrator and main character (the German Writer) as she experiences a single day of personal and community crisis. On a personal level, the writer is struggling through the brain surgery of her brother, who lives far away and with whom she "speaks" to throughout the narrative. We experience the writer's relationship in something of a past tense, moments of reminiscence, concern, and wonder. She speaks of their shared past and she expresses her love and concern for her brother, and wonders about his future. Intertwined in that personal crisis is a worldwide concern regarding the after-effects of the Chernobyl Nuclear Accident. There is great struggle for the writer as she attempts to navigate this new world, with its warnings about milk and vegetables, and the fear of the great storm cloud that threatens to rain down deadly radiation on all.

    Accident is probably one of the most oddly-written books that I have ever read. There is never a clear identification of the characters of the novel, the kind of introduction and details that make the reader care about what he or she is reading. While this stylistic choice may allow the reader to relate with their own lives or may provide a more detailed telling of the narrator's thoughts than others, I found myself at times grasped by the story and other times forcing myself forward. At times, the thoughts of the writer fleeted back and forth as she experienced her day. Once in a while, as she shared them I struggled to figure out why a particular paragraph or idea was included. It seemed that our main character was so preoccupied with her crises that nearly everyone and everything was relevant in the destruction of the man or the world. I often found it very difficult to read this novel while still following the story line and tracking what was happening in the multiple plot lines that seemed to be developing, perhaps in part because I am not fully familiar with some of the other works.

    In the end, this novel seemed to be one of those that left more questions than answers. The resolutions are only those that are for the single day's events. We may be informed as to the outcome of the surgery, and perhaps the closing of the day in nuclear wonder, and even the mundane events that seem to occupy our daily lives, but I felt that I had to fill in the blanks about what the future may hold for the writer, her brother, and the nuclear world. At the same time, life is often like the writer's thoughts, with one idea leading to another and the most simple object leading to a memory or idea. Truth be told, most stories leave a good number of unanswered questions; and every ending is merely just another beginning. A new day will follow this for each of the characters of the book, as life presses onward.