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ePub Riders download

by Tim Winton

ePub Riders download
Author:
Tim Winton
ISBN13:
978-0330339414
ISBN:
0330339419
Language:
Publisher:
Pan Books Ltd; 1st English Edition edition (February 24, 1995)
Category:
Subcategory:
Contemporary
ePub file:
1670 kb
Fb2 file:
1327 kb
Other formats:
txt docx lrf azw
Rating:
4.4
Votes:
879

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Home Tim Winton The Riders.

Tim Winton is Australia’s most decorated and beloved literary novelist. There's nothing straightforward in Lockie Leonard's life right now. Dumped by his girlfriend, he's back to being the loneliest kid in town until, that is, he meets Egg - who turns out to be the weirdest human being he's ever met.

The Riders (1994) is a novel by Australian author Tim Winton published in 1994. It was shortlisted for the Booker Prize in 1995. Winton has won several literary awards. The Riders tells the story of an Australian man, Fred Scully, and his 7-year-old daughter Billie. Scully, as he is known, and his wife Jennifer have planned to move from Australia to a cottage they have purchased in Ireland

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FREE shipping on qualifying offers. An exploration of marriage and the rich relationship that can exist between father and daughter, The Riders is a gorgeously wrought novel from the award-winning author Tim Winton. After traveling through Europe for two years.

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I first read The Riders in 1996, shortly after its publication. Tim Winton had been shortlisted for the Booker Prize and I was anxious to try a new author

I first read The Riders in 1996, shortly after its publication. Tim Winton had been shortlisted for the Booker Prize and I was anxious to try a new author. The writing left me cold. I shelved the volume and forgot about Winton. At least I thought I had forgotten about him.

Long letters home, endless meals, collaborations on the Mickey Mouse colouring book and readings from Jules Verne.

Long letters home, endless meals, collaborations on the Mickey Mouse colouring book and readings from Jules Verne. There was the golden colour of their always bare skin.

The Riders, the novel that brought Tim Winton his first Booker Prize shortlisting, charts an odyssey across Europe, a transfixing journey through the underworld of every lover's nightmare. Fred Scully waits at the arrival gate of an international airport, anxious to see his wife and daughter. After two years in Europe they are finally settling down. The Riders, the novel that brought Tim Winton his first Booker Prize shortlisting, charts an odyssey across Europe, a transfixing journey through the underworld of every lover's nightmare.

Fred waits at the airport for his wife and daughter, a fresh start in front of them. But only the child arrives. This begins Fred's journey across Europe through the underworld of every lover's nightmare, as father and daughter chase the woman who has seemingly ceased to exist.
  • I am a huge fan of this author but The Riders gets the lowest star rating of all I have read. It is over written, goes on for too long and ends completely inconclusively. There is no resolution. Well, to this reader, anyway. Maybe Tim Winton sees more between the lines than is evident to me. The adventure of father and daughter goes on for too long, although the pace is relentless, which does drive you on. Although they seem to find laughs out of their misery here and there, I found the unrelenting misery of their ordeal wearing. Billie acts like she's an adult, yet she's only seven. I don't know any seven year old that would put up with her father as she does let alone take on his obsession and effectively lead him as she does. Tim Winton's prose is magic but the content of this story is too dark and ugly to be enjoyable. It is as though the author wants to write about Europe - and he can - but the story line just doesn't match up. Pity.

  • This book is dark and haunting-typical Tim Winton style. His characters are very believable and well-defined. Couldn't put it down.
    For reference, I really like John Irving, Wally Lamb, Rohinton Mistry. If you like those writers-try Tim Winton. Cloud Street & Dirt Music were phenomenal works, and this one also great. I am having a hard time with Erie-his character may be a little TOO dark for me but will try again. Just ordered Breath-looking forward to seeing what that one is like.

  • Started out great, then down hill from there. Really got mad at the way it progressed to the point that i wished id' put the book down after a good start and finished writing it myself..

  • First book of Winton's that I've read. He's a good writer but two overriding complaints. First, I found a lot of his dialogue forced and silly. Second, the ending was remarkably disappointing--he never resolves the key issue. Why does a wife and mother walk away--who knows.

  • I enjoyed this book although found the premise a bit far fetched until I thought about it after a few days. I think the way parents try to rationalize their child's behavior is realistic.

  • I became so involved with the characters I stayed up all night reading it---no so great next day LOL but worth it.

  • The madness between hopeful insecurity and the hollowness of a broken heart. A father has his seven year daughter on an long european roadtrip-comedown, in search for the mother, which turns into a nightmare of raw survival. The daughter reads Hogo's "hunchback of notre dame" and this becomes quite a metaphor on the father, as we read on. - And did I read on? Couldn't put it down. Luckily, with my kindle paperwhite, I can read in the dark, into the night. Some sex, third person, alternating present and past tense, serving as a magnifying glass. I'm glad tim winton has reached the screen by now, "cloud street"," the turning" and more.

  • Too much symbolism ....... why does this poor child suffer so at the hands of a "good" father