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ePub Massacre River download

by Linda Coverdale,Lyonel Trouillot,Edwidge Danticat,René Philoctète

ePub Massacre River download
Author:
Linda Coverdale,Lyonel Trouillot,Edwidge Danticat,René Philoctète
ISBN13:
978-0811217255
ISBN:
0811217256
Language:
Publisher:
New Directions; 1st edition (May 17, 2008)
Category:
Subcategory:
Contemporary
ePub file:
1692 kb
Fb2 file:
1384 kb
Other formats:
doc mbr mobi docx
Rating:
4.3
Votes:
900

I read the novel both in French and English - and Linda Coverdale's translation is, in its own right, as dazzling and as unexpected a jewel as that of Philoctète's text.

Only 7 left in stock (more on the way). I read the novel both in French and English - and Linda Coverdale's translation is, in its own right, as dazzling and as unexpected a jewel as that of Philoctète's text. The staccato rhythm of her sentences, the amazing verbal invention of her translation, the roller-coasting mastery of her syntax and connotations, the depth of her understanding even the most fluttering vacillation of punning meanings make her translation not just a work of art, but an amazingly loving tribute and homage to the author - the perfection of which puts us French to shame

by René Philoctète & translated by Linda Coverdale. Philoctète’s work is not an easy read; although dense with footnotes, for those unfamiliar with the history of the Dominican Republic, the story will remain somewhat opaque. Pub Date: Nov. 30th, 2005.

by René Philoctète & translated by Linda Coverdale.

Edwidge Danticat, Preface, in René Philoctète, Massacre River, trans. René Philoctète, Massacre River, trans. Linda Coverdale (New York: New Directions Books, 2005 ), 21. oogle Scholar. Linda Coverdale ( New York: New Directions Books, 2005 ), . 3. 5. See Frank Moya Pons, The Dominican Republic: A National History ( Princeton, NJ: Markus Wiener Publishers, 1998 .

Fiction by René Philoctète. Translated by Linda Coverdale. With a contribution by Edwidge Danticat. René Philoctète's Massacre River is a hair-raising roller-coaster ride, a feat of literary prestidigitation, a moving and enduring work by one of Haiti's under-recognized master writers.

The Farming of Bones begins in 1937 in a village on the Dominican side of the river that separates the country from Haiti.

You miss 100% of the shots you don’t take. The Farming of Bones begins in 1937 in a village on the Dominican side of the river that separates the country from Haiti. Amabelle Desir, Haitian-born and a faithful maidservant to the Dominican family that took her in when she was orphaned, and her love. Anacaona: Golden Flower, Haiti, 1490.

His novel Massacre River about the Parsley massacre was translated into English by Linda Coverdale and published by New Directions in 2005.

René Philoctète (1932-1995) was a Haitian poet. Born in Jérémie, some of his most notable poems are Saison des hommes (1960), which was also his first published poem, Les Tambours du Soleil (1962), and Ces Iles qui Marchent (1969). His novel Massacre River about the Parsley massacre was translated into English by Linda Coverdale and published by New Directions in 2005.

Discover new books on Goodreads. See if your friends have read any of René Philoctète's books. René Philoctète’s Followers (2). René Philoctète.

A moving reflection on a subject that touches us all, by the bestselling author of Claire of the Sea Light. The book moves outward from the shock of her mother's diagnosis and sifts through Danticat's writing life and personal history, all the while shifting fluidly from examples that range from Gabriel García Márquez's One Hundred Years of Solitude to Toni Morrison's Sula.

Massacre River book download Rene Philoctete, Linda Coverdale, Edwidge Danticat and Lyonel Trouillot Download Massacre River Massacre River by Rene Philoctete - Powell's Books Massacre River by Rene Philoctete: In 1937 the power-mad racist Generalissimo.

Massacre River: Rene Philoctete, Linda Coverdale, Edwidge Danticat. Purple said: I still love this book, but I just bumped it down one star. In 1937, when Generalissimo

Flag as Inappropriate. His novel Massacre River was translated into English by Linda Coverdale and published by New Directions in 2005.

Flag as Inappropriate. It is noted for its lucid metaphors and experimental prose and features a preface by Edwidge Danticat and an introduction by Lyonel Trouillot.

In 1937 the power-mad racist Generalissimo Trujillo ordered the slaughter of thousands and thousands of Haitians―and, as Philoctete puts it, death set up shop everywhere. At the heart of Massacre River is the loving marriage of the Dominican Pedro and the Haitian Adele in a little town on the Dominican border. On his way to work, Pedro worries that a massacre is in the making; an olive-drab truck packed with armed soldiers rumbles by. And then the church bells begin to ring, and there is the relentless voice on the radio everywhere, urging the slaughter of all the Haitians. Operation Cabezas Haitianas (Haitian Heads) is underway, the soldiers shout, "Perejil! [Parsley!] Perish! Punish!" Haitians try to pronounce "perejil" correctly, but fail, and weep. The town is in an uproar, Adele is ordered to say "perejil" but stammers. And Pedro runs home and searches for his beloved wife, searches and searches… "The characters of this book not only inspired the love and outrage of an extraordinary writer like Philoctete," writes Edwidge Danticat, "but continue to challenge the meaning of community and humanity in all of us."
  • I am a fast reader,skimming over words just to get the story.Not with this book.Every word is to be slowly chewed and enjoyed.A terrible tragedy told so well.
    I have worked in the nearby Ramon Matias hospital and walked to the river on lunch breaks.They say the river changed it's course because of the damming from the thousands of bodies.

  • So artfully written. Philoctete's magical realism conveys the individual experience of this brutal massacre and the historical context surrounding it in the most "real" way. The love between Adele and Pedro is so beautifully crafted, rendering the terror of their situation all the more tangible.

  • This books sucks

  • The Caribbean island of Hispaniola is shared by two countries, Haiti to the west and the much larger Dominican Republic to the east. The two nations are separated by a latitudinal border, part of which is formed by the Dajabon River, which is also known as Massacre River. Haiti is populated primarily by its African descendants, and it is the poorest country in the Caribbean and the Americas; the Dominican Republic contains a much richer mixture of people from Spain and other European countries, East and West Asia, and other Caribbean countries, including Haiti, and it has the second largest economy in the Caribbean.

    Both countries have longstanding histories of colonization and subjugation by Western powers, violent civil wars, oppressive dictators, and bloody border battles. Because of the long porous border and the marked difference in the economies and standards of living of the two nations, Haitians have for years crossed over to the Dominican Republic to find work and better lives for themselves, and particularly in the border towns they often established friendship and not infrequently found love with their Dominican neighbors.

    In 1930 the notorious dictator General Rafael Trujillo was "elected" president of the Dominican Republic, after a violent campaign in which many of his opponents were eliminated. Trujillo held great admiration for Adolf Hitler, particularly his views on racial purity, and later in that decade he declared the Dominican Republic was a country of white people, in stark contrast to its black neighbors to the west but also in opposition to his country's mixed race majority. The <i>blancos de la tierra</i> (whites of the land) were revered and rewarded, whereas darker skinned Dominicans were reviled and punished.

    As part of this effort, Trujillo embarked on a campaign to rid the country of as many Haitians as possible, supposedly to prevent them from robbing their Dominican neighbors, but in actuality to achieve greater racial purity. He focused this effort on the border between the two nations, especially the region adjacent to Massacre River, and in a six day campaign of terror in October 1937 tens of thousands of Haitians were brutally murdered by soldiers in the Dominican Army. This act of genocide became known as the <[...]>, as Dominican soldiers would show dark skinned residents of the border towns a sprig of parsley, and ask them to say the word for it in Spanish, <i>perejil</i>. The Creole speaking Haitians often could not pronounce the word properly, and those who failed to do so were beheaded with machetes on the spot, or taken to fields where they were executed by firing squads.

    [Massacre River] is a novel about the Parsley Massacre, which is centered around a young couple who are deeply in love with each other, the Dominican Pedro Brito and his beautiful Haitian wife Adèle, who live close to the river. A premonition of the massacre comes in the form of an ominous large raptor, which swoops over and shadows the town and its residents. As the townspeople become aware of Trujillo's plans, Adèle becomes fearful for her own safety. Pedro attempts to comfort her and allieviate her concerns, and leaves her at home to go to work on the fateful day that soldiers enter the town. As word comes in on the radio of the massacre that is taking place, with the death toll in each town enthusiastically announced by broadcasters, Pedro rushes to get back home to find out what has happened to Adèle. When he returns he and other workers are met with a surreal and horrific scene, as the heads of the massacre's victims bounce around the bloodied town, giving voice to the day's events and demanding justice for the atrocities inflicted upon them by singing machetes swung by men loyal to Trujillo, "the Lord of demented death".

    [Massacre River] is a superb story, which uses magical realism to both blunt the gruesome details and highlight the profound effects of the Parsley Massacre on Haitians and their Dominican neighbors. It is also a touching love story and, oddly enough, it contains an element of humor, which would seem to be inappropriate in the face of genocide but actually permits a view of the humanity of the Haitian and Dominican people and their respect and love for each other, which is unaffected by this tragedy. , the novel's author, is one of the most revered authors in Haiti, but to date this is the only novel of his that has been translated into English, and he is not well known outside of the Caribbean. I enjoyed this unique and entertaining novel, and I hope that more of his work will be translated into English in the near future.

  • Massacre River

    Massacre River - a title, by the way, which does not by far do justice to the original Le Peuple des terres mêlées, as the translator dutifully explains - is a book from the reading of which no serious reader will come out unmoved. Written in a prose as trenchant as matter-of-fact journalism yet as literary as Dante's Divine Comedy, suffused with the almost incredibly aromatic thereness of the land it takes place in, this short feverish novel manages both to give a very carnal voice to the atrocious events it attempts to keep alive against the anonymous flow of statistical history and to oppose to such iron-clad and banalized atrocities the ever singular lilts and words, hopes and doings, moments and despairs, smells and bodies, of those who were actually murdered. Far from the too easily dismissive label of "magical realism" the West is so wont to slap onto whatever is written under a Caribbean sky in order to forget and trivialize the actual reality it so relentlessly created and continues to impose, Massacre River firmly grounds its feet in the reality of its place and not a single image, metaphor or simile of its prose is or tries to be a literary evasion from the suffocating horror it calls back to life. Each and every word - for instance the sudden, almost chaotic and breathless, acceleration and accumulation of verbs at the end of some sentences - stands as a marker, a building block, as an effect of the endlessly deployed atrocity described. Yet, Philoctète - and in this he is one of the true writers of the very bloody 20th century - never lets go of the novel itself as the story of individuals caught up in an unintelligible reality from which they try to make sense. The love story which runs as a fil rouge throughout his text is one of the most exquisite ever conceived, and his baroque sense of humor, as well as his acute sensibility to the multifarious presences and instances of the quotidian, never bows down in a silence of petrified stupefaction in front of the horror: by his very act of telling, the mythologized Cruel and Impersonal Beast history sometimes too easily becomes in other narrations (think Heart of Darkness, for instance) is shown as real acts which real human beings inflict upon other real human beings.

    I read the novel both in French and English - and Linda Coverdale's translation is, in its own right, as dazzling and as unexpected a jewel as that of Philoctète's text. The staccato rhythm of her sentences, the amazing verbal invention of her translation, the roller-coasting mastery of her syntax and connotations, the depth of her understanding even the most fluttering vacillation of punning meanings make her translation not just a work of art, but an amazingly loving tribute and homage to the author - the perfection of which puts us French to shame, for not having a readily available print of this absolute marvel of a book.

  • I believe this is the best novel -so far- on the 1937 massacre.

  • This book is sooo sci-fi-ish, it is incredible. I totally loved it. If you like using your imagination then this book's for you. Alot more creative than Danticat's and Prestol Castillo's works on the Massacre of 37'. Anyways, I recommend it. I think Im going to write an analysis of it soon.

    Peace and Blessings.