mostraligabue
» » Moon Tiger

ePub Moon Tiger download

by Penelope Lively

ePub Moon Tiger download
Author:
Penelope Lively
ISBN13:
978-0802135339
ISBN:
0802135331
Language:
Publisher:
Grove Press (September 18, 1997)
Category:
Subcategory:
Contemporary
ePub file:
1306 kb
Fb2 file:
1116 kb
Other formats:
txt mobi lrf mbr
Rating:
4.7
Votes:
290

with an introduction by ANTHONY THWAITE. Moon Tiger was Penelope Lively’s seventh novel for adults. She had already established a high reputation as a writer for children.

with an introduction by ANTHONY THWAITE. Published by the Penguin Group. Penguin Books Ltd, 80 Strand, London WC2R 0RL, England.

The Moon Tiger is a green coil that slowly burns all night, repelling mosquitoes, dropping away into lengths of grey ash, its glowing red eye a companion of the hot insect-rasping darkness. Atmospheric enough in its own right, the image takes on more power when you know that this Moon Tiger comes.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Winner of the Man Booker Prize and Shortlisted for the Golden Man Booker Prize The elderly Claudia Hampton.

Lively Penelope (EN). Penelope Lively's Booker Prize winning classic, Moon Tiger is a haunting story of loss and desire. Claudia Hampton - beautiful, famous, independent, dying. But she remains defiant to the last, telling her nurses that she will write a 'history of the world. and in the process, my own'. And it is her story from a childhood just after the First World War through the Second and beyond. But Claudia's life is entwined with others and she must allow those who knew her, loved her, the chance to speak, to put across their point of view.

Rarely does an author take you as far inside a character as Penelope Lively does with Claudia. This novel is a gift to readers.

Moon Tiger is a 1987 novel by Penelope Lively which spans the time before, during and after World War II. The novel won the 1987 Booker Prize. It is written from multiple points of view and moves backward and forward through time

Moon Tiger is a 1987 novel by Penelope Lively which spans the time before, during and after World War II. It is written from multiple points of view and moves backward and forward through time. It begins as the story of a woman who, on her deathbed, decides to write a history of the world, and develops into a story of love, incest and the desire to be recognized as an independent free thinking woman of the time.

Penelope Lively was born in Cairo in 1933

This is a unique book about a fascinating unpredictable woman way ahead of her time and yet absolutely of her time' Lemn Sissay. Penelope Lively was born in Cairo in 1933. She has twice been shortlisted for the Booker Prize; once in 1977 for her first novel, The Road to Lichfield, and again in 1984 for According to Mark. She later won the 1987 Booker Prize for her highly acclaimed novel Moon Tiger. Her novels include Passing On, City of the Mind, Cleopatra's Sister and Heat Wave, and many are published by Penguin.

There’s nothing – just the window. ‘There!’ – she stabs the air – ‘Thing movin. hat’s it called? Name!’‘Nothing that I can see,’ says the nurse briskly. that’s all. Have a sleep

There’s nothing – just the window. Have a sleep. I’ll draw the curtains. The face, suddenly, relaxes. Curtain,’ she mutters. ‘Yes, dear,’ says the nurse. For an instant, I stared into a void

Winner of the Man Booker PrizePenelope Lively won Britain's prestigious Booker Prize for this deeply moving, elegantly structured novel. Elderly, uncompromising Claudia Hampton lies in a London hospital bed with memories of life fluttering through her fading consciousness

Winner of the Man Booker PrizePenelope Lively won Britain's prestigious Booker Prize for this deeply moving, elegantly structured novel. Elderly, uncompromising Claudia Hampton lies in a London hospital bed with memories of life fluttering through her fading consciousness. An author of popular history, Claudia proclaims she's carrying out her last project: a history of the world.

Winner of the Man Booker Prize and Shortlisted for the Golden Man Booker PrizeThe elderly Claudia Hampton, a best-selling author of popular history; lies alone in a London hospital bed. Memories of her life still glow in her fading consciousness, but she imagines writing a history of the world. Instead, Moon Tiger is her own history, the life of a strong, independent woman, with its often contentious relations with family and friends. At its center — forever frozen in time, the still point of her turning world — is the cruelly truncated affair with Tom, a British tank commander whom Claudia knew as a reporter in Egypt during World War II.
  • Penelope Lively is a modern British writer. Moon Tiger is one of her best, written in 1997. The book opens when Claudia is in her seventies and dying in a nursing home. Then there is a series of flashbacks to her life.

    She's a wild and wonderful character from an upscale British home, battling with her brother in her childhood, and battling with everyone else after that. Yes, Claudia has a strong personality and there is nothing soft or sweet about her. She's a hard-boiled journalist who gets caught up in the winds of history, living in Egypt during WWII and writing about it with a sharp and realistic tongue and indulging in a love affair that ends in tragedy.

    Her life is her career and she certainly is nonconventional. She is a mother of a daughter conceived with a Russian boyfriend who she was not intent on marrying. She's not a good mother in any sense of the word, leaving her daughter's upbringing to her own mother and being rather abrupt and unfeeling with the child.

    Perhaps the best part of the book is her reportage of the War in Egypt. Usually books about WWII do not go into this aspect in much detail. However, her words makes it come alive. Her personality comes alive too. She is anarchistic, neurotic and filled with her own self-importance. Frankly, she is not a likable character. But she is real, very real and frankly, I loved her.

    I enjoyed this book. It took me to a time and a place in history that I found fascinating. And I loved the view of history through the personal lens of this writer.

  • First off, I hate that Amazon asks "Is there violence", as if that would sell the book. Yes there is, but it is a war story, so you can't expect a Disney fantasy, and the violence is not for the gratification of prurient desires, or 'entertainment'. The same is true with sexual content. This is about adults, and adults do make love. That said, Moon Tiger is one of the most captivating books I've read in a long time. Claudia, the basic protagonist is a professor of history, which is her life in this tale, which, at first, appears to be an autobiography. The conceit of the author, and the narrator, is that our world is not just that which goes on in our own minds, but also in other's conceptions of us. This is the fabric which makes us whole. Some episodes are thus repeated in the viewpoint of another person engaged in the scene. Lively uses this device with precision, that goes deep into the psyche of Claudia. At times we view her with disfavor, but, like a true acquaintance, the reader also sees her with affection. Lively won the Booker Prize for this book, and deserves it without reservation.

  • After so many stellar reviews for this extraordinary Booker Prize winning novel,
    I am reluctant to write yet another.

    However, as the story feels very personal on a variety of levels,
    I am compelled to write my admiration for this superb book, and the affect it has on me.

    My English parents were in the British Army in the Middle East, and I was born in Cairo, Egypt in 1944.

    Only recently I learnt my biological father was not my father who brought me up, but an RCAF pilot,
    who died before the war ended.

    I have not been able to find his family name, but his first name was Charles.

    He was “Tom Southern” in Moon Tiger.

    My mother had many traits of “Cecilia Hampton” and shortly before she died in 2014,
    my mother left a leather bound volume of handwritten letters from Dad during the final years of the war.

    No doubt Dad was very surprised his future bride had suddenly a son which he had not fathered, but he brought me up as his own, and I never knew otherwise.

    Ms. Lively’s wonderfully evocative book has helped me fill in some of the gaps,
    to experience how Cairo was then, the atmosphere of wartime, and how I came to be in this world.

    Thank you, Dame Penelope.

  • Gorgeously written, Moon Tiger is at once a rumination on the nature of memory and an inquiry into how we make sense of the past: both the larger scale events of history as well as the smaller episodes comprising our own lives. Lyrical and reflective in tone and style, it is the kind of book you want to read slowly to savor the lushness of the writing and the thoughtfulness of its ideas.

  • When I first started this novel, I thought it jumped around rather chaotically, but then I realized that it was cleverly written like the mind of someone of advanced age who was dying. As it moved from present to past and back again, you began to see what Claudia's life had been. I found the descriptions of life in Cairo during World War II fascinating, as well as the British battles with Rommel. Very good book!

  • The book is not easy as it describes the last days of an elderly lady, with details that reminded me of my late mom. It is bouncing between past and present, hence showing the heroine from different angles. As all Lively books, the characters are deep, complex, interesting. I loved the book.

  • Claudia Hampton reflects about her life, her loves, her successes and disappointments, as she lays in hospital in the final stages of cancer. Her memories flow randomly as she tries to interpret her life. Through the moving account of her life we get a glimpse of a complex and strong woman full of vitality and strength, of lost love, of complicated relationships. The writing is exquisite, Penelope Lively has richly deserved the Booker Prize, which she received for this book. I not always like Booker Prize books, but I highly recommend this one.

  • Penelope Lively's approach to history seen through the eyes of an older woman who is dying brings the readers awareness to the way all of us replay our histories, as a kalidescope, past and present overlapping and intercepting. A story of love, and war, unusual characters, and a vivid world view make this a jewel of a story.