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ePub Brixton Beach download

by Roma Tearne

ePub Brixton Beach download
Author:
Roma Tearne
ISBN13:
978-0007301553
ISBN:
0007301553
Language:
Publisher:
HarperPress (2011)
Category:
Subcategory:
Contemporary
ePub file:
1674 kb
Fb2 file:
1244 kb
Other formats:
docx rtf mobi azw
Rating:
4.1
Votes:
482

In memory of N M C whose story, discarded for forty years, is told at last. Chapter 17. Acknowledgements.

In memory of N M C whose story, discarded for forty years, is told at last. And for Barrie, Oliver, Alistair and Mollie. All of life is a foreign country. There are police everywhere. From a distance it is the first thing he sees. Even before he hears the noise of sirens, the screams.

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Even at the very beginning she knew the house was not the problem. Once she had named it she set about painting the rooms. She painted the bedroom first; a deep aquamarine turquoise

Even at the very beginning she knew the house was not the problem. She painted the bedroom first; a deep aquamarine turquoise. It was an unhappy moment and brought on their first argument. Something had to, she supposed, surprising herself with a sharp flash of defiance. She apologised quickly, but the room was already painted. Then, after their disagreement had been brushed aside, she lime-washed the kitchen a delicate duck-egg blue

Roma Tearne (née Chrysostom) is a Sri Lankan-born artist and writer living and working in England. Her debut novel, Mosquito, was shortlisted for the 2007 Costa Book Awards first Novel prize (formerly the Whitbread Prize)

Roma Tearne (née Chrysostom) is a Sri Lankan-born artist and writer living and working in England. Her debut novel, Mosquito, was shortlisted for the 2007 Costa Book Awards first Novel prize (formerly the Whitbread Prize). Roma Tearne completed an MA at the Ruskin School of Drawing and Fine Art, Oxford in September 2002 and was Leverhulme Artist in Residence at the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford 2002-3. She was Artist in Residence at Modern Art Oxford in February 2005.

To find out we have first to go back thirty years to a small island in the Indian Ocean where a little girl named Alice Fonseka is learning to ride a bicycle on the beach.

Opening dramatically with the horrors of the 2005 London bombings, this is the profoundly moving story of a country on the brink of civil war and a child's struggle to come to terms with loss. To find out we have first to go back thirty years to a small island in the Indian Ocean where a little girl named Alice Fonseka is learning to ride a bicycle on the beach. The island is Sri Lanka, with its community on the brink of civil war. Alice's life is about to change forever.

This book contains tragedy on a grand scale. Just when it seems we are done with the heartbreak along comes a little bit more

This book contains tragedy on a grand scale. Just when it seems we are done with the heartbreak along comes a little bit more Читать весь отзыв.

As Roma Tearne observes: "the war had become a worn-out habit on the island. the brutality of which was hardly noticed in the west. Other wars, more important ones in larger, richer countries, hit the headlines. Tearne came to England at the age of 10, when her Tamil father and Sinhalese mother settled in south London in 1964.

In the same spirit, Roma Tearne has given her latest novel a title with a twisting double meaning. A family saga based on the lives of three generations of Sri Lankans, stretching from the beaches of the Indian Ocean that inspire. There is an ironically named 1970s skateboard park in South London known as Brixton Beach, a concrete patch a stone's throw from the High Street. In the same spirit, Roma Tearne has given her latest novel a title with a twisting double meaning.

HarperCollins, (формат: 125x195, 432 ст. электронная книга.

Mosquito (ISBN 0007233655), Roma Tearne's first book was published on March 5th 2007 by Harper Collins. Her second novel, Bone China (ISBN 0007240732), is due to be published in spring 2008 by the same publisher. HarperCollins, (формат: 125x195, 432 ст.

  • I am amazed that more people haven't discovered Roma Tearne. Her writing is nothing short of amazing. This is the third book I've read by her and there isn't a boring moment. Her prose flows and I seemed to be taken on a ride through her wonderful land of Sri Lanka. That in spite of the horror of war. Actually this book deals with not only the horror of the civil war in Sri Lanka but also the horror of the West's misguided assault on the Middle East.

    Highly recommend.

  • Brixton Beach
    Beautifully written--Tearne's background as an artist adds such depth, without being frilly. The violence of this book is made bearable only by the simple beauty and honesty of her storytelling.

    Although Brixton Beach is a semi-autobiographical novel, I don't think you need to know Tearne's background to be drawn in. But just in case: When she was only 10, Tearne and her parents fled the violence of Sri Lanka to live in England. Her father was Tamil (persecuted minority) and her mother Sinhalese (privileged majority). Her life and novels are in many ways about recreating a lost home and a lost past. Her images of Sri Lanka--a kind of paradise in hell--are haunting and absolutely real. Nostalgia is always present, and always, eventually, tainted with aversion. As it turns out, this potential for violence can't be escaped, even in England.

    Also good to know: there are *always* two passages in Tearne's novels that make me cry--one with despair, the other with gratitude. Brixton Beach was no exception.

    An easy read in terms of the fluidity of the writing and the plot pacing, but emotionally demanding.

  • If you have not any of her books, try this and the others. I have read 4 and all were fantastic.

  • I sort-of stumbled across this book and am so pleased I did. It gave me a tantalising insight into the history of Sri Lanka and the political issues behind the bloodshed in this country. It also made me think about the personal back-stories to major world events. I really enjoyed and recommend it.

  • In over fifty years of reading, I have never felt so conflicted about a novel. I loved this book and I hated it. The story itself, I have few complaints about (although I thought the ending was too rushed and overly sensational). The writing, however, while oftentimes beautiful and compelling, was full of errors and omissions and confusion. Countless times while reading dialogue I had to read the same passage twice or three times or more in order to make sense of who was speaking. Sometimes words were repeated in error. And many times things just didn't make sense to me. As an example, at one point we are told that a family member sent an article of clothing to another family member. But later we're told that a different family member bought a similar article of clothing. I kept waiting to hear about what happened to the first, mailed example, but it was never mentioned again. I can happily accept the odd mistake in editing, but this book seemed rife with errors. The reading experience was, overall, painful and frustrating.

  • Well written, interesting reading about the problems in Ceylon, good story, would like to read more by the same author.

  • Brixton Beach by Roma Tearne presents a vast project. Its story crosses the globe, beginning in Sri Lanka and ending in Britain. Great events befall its characters, but throughout their lives seem to be writ small against a backdrop of history.

    The novel opens with an apt quote from Jack Kerouac - All life is a foreign country. This idea forms substantially more than a theme, in the no matter how secure the book's characters might appear - and equally however insecure - they never really seem to be at home with themselves.

    We meet the Fonsekas in Colombo. They live near the beach in this frenetic city. Alice is a nine-year-old. Her parents, Stanley and Sita are a mixed marriage, Tamil and Sinhalese. Alice's grandparents, Bee and Kamala, are happily married in their own way. Bee is something of an artist. The grandparent show significant wisdom.

    But things are stirring in Sri Lanka. There is a smell of conflict, a hint or war. A mixed marriage is hard to sustain, and its offspring don't fit into anyone's interests or desires. Alice grows into a rather isolated child. She has friends, but then she doesn't. She does well at school, and then she doesn't. She makes things, shares her grandfather's artistic bent.

    Lives in paradise grow steadily more complicated, apparently less sustainable. Stanley, Alice's father, decides that his future, and eventually his family's, lies in Britain. He books a sea passage and an unscheduled stop-over in Greece opens his eyes to ancient cincture and provides other activities that always threatened, but until then never materialised.

    In Britain he ekes out an immigrant's lot, doing whatever he can. When Sita and Alice eventually join him, he has changed and they don't fit in. They can't. Perhaps no-one ever does, anywhere. Sita mourns the child she lost to her own destruction as she works from home on her sewing machine. Alice doesn't get on at school, except with a chain-smoking art teacher. And so life progresses, from one mistake to the next, with an idealised past becoming a new paradise, a place that it perhaps never was. But there is no going back. Conflict has intervened. Lives have been lost and there will be more to follow.

    Marriages fail. There are short passionate affairs. There is much imagined longing. Roma Tearne's story thus meanders through its themes, but without ever concentrating on any particular one to create a lasting impression. The characters seem more confused than reflecting, more victims of events than their instigators. Wherever they are, they remain foreign.

  • The first half of this book is set in Sri Lanka and is beautiful and evocative, full of colour, laughter and joy. The second half is heart wrenchingly sad. I read the second half with a permanent lump in my throat. It is the vitality of the first half that makes the second half so tragic. But for me none of this is what makes the book so memorable and kept me thinking about it for weeks after I had read it. The greatest achievement of this book is to give a name and a face and a story to what have become just numbers in the news these days. The book starts with a terrorist attack in central London, it then goes back to tell the story of one of the faceless "numbers" caught up in the attack. It is this life story that still haunts me, long after reading this beautiful book.