mostraligabue
» » The Antigone of Sophocles

ePub The Antigone of Sophocles download

by Richard C. Jebb,E. S. Shuckburgh

ePub The Antigone of Sophocles download
Author:
Richard C. Jebb,E. S. Shuckburgh
ISBN13:
978-0521065252
ISBN:
0521065259
Language:
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press (January 25, 1973)
Category:
Subcategory:
Dramas & Plays
ePub file:
1472 kb
Fb2 file:
1446 kb
Other formats:
mobi lrf doc rtf
Rating:
4.4
Votes:
195

Sophocles; Jebb, Richard Claverhouse, Sir, 1841-1905; Shuckburgh, Evelyn Shirley, 1843-1906.

Top. American Libraries Canadian Libraries Universal Library Community Texts Project Gutenberg Biodiversity Heritage Library Children's Library. Sophocles; Jebb, Richard Claverhouse, Sir, 1841-1905; Shuckburgh, Evelyn Shirley, 1843-1906. Cambridge University Press. robarts; greatbooks; toronto.

Translated by R. C. Jebb. daughters of Oedipus: ANTIGONE ISMENE CREON, King of Thebes EURYDICE, his wife HAEMON, his son TEIRESIAS, the blind prophet GUARD, set to watch the corpse of Polyneices FIRST MESSENGER SECOND MESSENGER, from the house CHORUS OF THEBAN ELDERS. The same as in Oedipus the King, an open space before the royal palace, once that of Oedipus, at Thebes. The backscene represents the front of the palace, with three doors, of which the central and largest is the principal entrance into the house.

Cambridge, University Press. Sophocles' Antigone and the Democratic Voice. Judith Fletcher - 2010 - In S. E. Wilmer & Audrone Zukauskaite (ed., Interrogating Antigone in Postmodern Philosophy and Criticism. Oxford University Press. pp. 168. Sophocles’ Antigone and the History of the Concept of Natural Law. Burns Tony - 2002 - Political Studies 50 (3). Sophocles, Antigone. A New Dramatic Translation by F. Kinchin Smith.

The Antigone of Sophocles, Author: Sophocles. Author: Shuckburgh, Evelyn S. (Evelyn Shirley), 1843-1906. Note: Cambridge, University Press, 1902. Published online by Cambridge University Press: 27 October 2009.

Similar books to Sophocles: Antigone (Cambridge Greek and Latin .

Similar books to Sophocles: Antigone (Cambridge Greek and Latin Classics).

These books were typically compilations The Life of Augustus (1903) gives Shuckburgh's own views of Augustus and his age. A General History of Rome to the Battle of Actium appeared in 1894.

These books were typically compilations In 1889 Shuckburgh made a complete translation of Polybius, and then a translation of Cicero's letters in Messrs. Bell's series (1899-1900). The Life of Augustus (1903) gives Shuckburgh's own views of Augustus and his age.

Antigone dies, Oedipus the king becomes a blinded outcast, and Electra is reunited with her long-lost brother .

Antigone dies, Oedipus the king becomes a blinded outcast, and Electra is reunited with her long-lost brother Orestes, who slaughters the incumbents of the Mycenaean throne. Time is the only conceptual benchmark by which Sophocles’ mortals can fully understand their difference from divinity. Unlike the power held by Creon or Oedipus or Clytemnestra, the sovereignty of the gods is immune to time’s passing. Sophocles was enormously popular within his own lifetime, and had his place in the gallery of the greatest poets of all time canonized by the generations immediately succeeding him.

Sophocles’s Antigone portrays human emotions and consequences that follow two distinct . Sir Richard C. Jebb, E. S. Shuckburgh, abs.

Sophocles’s Antigone portrays human emotions and consequences that follow two distinct choices. We can broaden the spectrum by saying that Creon represents public policy and Antigone represents individual conscience. According to E. Shuckburgh we must examine which is more important ‘state law or divine conscience’;. Shuckburgh xviii) Antigone is a story about two people who choose to make choices that each are passionate about and the consequences that follow. Introduction.

The play expands on the Theban legend that predates it, and it picks up where Aeschylus' Seven Against Thebes ends. As with all Greek plays, The Antigone is clearly separated into separate scenes, called episodes, by choral song and dance.

Oedipus, the former ruler of Thebes, has died. Now, when his young daughter Antigone defies her uncle, Kreon, the new ruler, because he has prohibited the burial of her dead brother, she and he enact a primal conflict between young and old, woman and man, individual and ruler, family and state, courageous and self-sacrificing reverence for the gods of the earth and perhaps self-serving allegiance to the gods of the sky.
  • Buy the student edition! It is cheaper than the others and I bet it contains nearly all the same content. Easy to understand, thoughtful read, albeit a bit short. It contains some philosophical questions leaving the reader to answer. It moves at a good pace and is clear, there's not a whole lot of hidden messages. Although I purchased this for school, it is a play that I will probably re-read and "get something out of". The only thing is that the picture on the cover on my book is different from the one advertised, so -1 star for that. It's a good read for someone who is newly interested in plays and dramas.

  • Very useful prefatory comments and probably the English translation truest to the French original. This version maintains the ambiguity that Anouilh seems to have intended. It thus goes far beyond any simple celebration of "resistance," and leaves us with more questions than answers. Excellent book.

  • I am familiar with the and partual to this drama, yet found the translation difficult. It it may be true to the original, but is far from our venecular.

  • There are many ways you could analyze or interpret this book. I really enjoyed it especially since it is so old and we still have some of these same problems today. The use of dialogue is genius and the characters are amazingly well developed in this short play. I personally enjoyed the feminism and how misogyny was not favored by the masses. It was a well written piece and I only wish that we had been able to recover more of Sophocles works.

  • Easy read, the translation is simple enough to get through this in an hour. Read it for a class but would recommend the story overall.

  • Surprisingly enjoyable read. I got this for my son's 10th grade English class and we read it out loud together, with each of us reading different characters. It was easy to understand and for our first exposure to Greek Tragedy, I was very pleasantly surpised. I highly recommend it.

  • Kindle Version is awful. It formats everything so weird...and reformats it when you are looking for a specific line. You never know where you're at in the book.

  • Hm.