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by John Wilson,Desiderius Erasmus

ePub In Praise of Folly (Dover Thrift Editions) download
Author:
John Wilson,Desiderius Erasmus
ISBN13:
978-0486426891
ISBN:
0486426890
Language:
Publisher:
Dover Publications (February 10, 2003)
Category:
Subcategory:
Genre Fiction
ePub file:
1137 kb
Fb2 file:
1658 kb
Other formats:
lrf lrf mobi mbr
Rating:
4.6
Votes:
305

Desiderius Erasmus (Author), John Wilson (Translator).

Desiderius Erasmus (Author), John Wilson (Translator). Who knew there was so much to be said In Praise of Folly? Apparently there is. In his panegyric of that name, Erasmus, with tongue planted firmly in cheek, and sometimes sounding somewhat like H. L. Mencken to my mind’s ear, says it all. He’s converted me. Bring on passion and frivolity.

My opinions aside, Praise of Folly is an important book in Western Civilization. It is worthy of your time on its own merit. The style of the period tends to weigh the humor down and a lack of internal division can make it a difficult read. In Praise of Folly is written in the form of a speech given by the Goddess of Folly making her claim of the primacy of Folly in human affairs. Her argument is intentionally faulty and occasionally contradictory but this is all part of the satire. Typical of Folly’s argument is an early one wherein she states that all humans are born in an act of folly. Unless you come to this book as a student of Western Literature or a related educated background having some context before you begin In Praise of Folly is critical.

In Praise of Folly, also translated as The Praise of Folly, is an essay written in Latin in 1509 by Desiderius Erasmus of Rotterdam and first printed in June 1511. Inspired by previous works of the Italian humanist Faustino Perisauli De Triumpho Stultitiae, it is a satirical attack on superstitions and other traditions of European society as well as on the Western Church.

In Praise of Folly - Desiderius Erasmus.

Desiderius Erasmus (1466–1536) was a Dutch Renaissance humanist and a Catholic priest and theologian.

ISBN 13: 9780486426891. Erasmus wrote In Praise of Folly, his masterpiece of ironic literature, in less than a week while en route to England from Italy to visit his good friend Thomas More. He wrote it merely to amuse himself and he was astonished at its immediate and wide popularity. Desiderius Erasmus (1466–1536) was a Dutch Renaissance humanist and a Catholic priest and theologian. Erasmus was a classical scholar who wrote in a "pure" Latin style and enjoyed the sobriquet "Prince of the Humanists.

Erasmus exerted a powerful influence not only through his books, but also through the private letters that he wrote to a great number of humanist scholars in all parts of Western Europe. He carried on extensive correspondences with Thomas More of England. More than 1500 of his letters survive today. Erasmus died in Basel, Switzerland, on July 12, 1536.

In Praise of Folly is an essay written in Latin in 1509 by Desiderius Erasmus of Rotterdam and first printed in June 1511. Desiderius Erasmus John Wilson.

Note moyenne 3,88,. ( 11 662 avis fournis par Goodreads ). Couverture souple. ISBN 10 : 0486426890 ISBN 13 : 9780486426891. In Praise of Folly is an essay written in Latin in 1509 by Desiderius Erasmus of Rotterdam and first printed in June 1511. Inspired by previous works of the Italian humanist Faustino Perisauli's De Triumpho Stultitiae, it is a satirical attack on superstitions and other traditions of European society as well as on the western Church.

By (author) Desiderius Erasmus. Free delivery worldwide. The book's purported narrator, the goddess Folly, proclaims herself to be the daughter of Youth and Wealth, nursed by Drunkenness and Ignorance. She is accompanied by such followers as Self-love, Pleasure, Flattery, and Sound Sleep.

This witty, influential work by one of the greatest scholars of the Renaissance satirizes the shortcomings of the upper classes and religious institutions of the time. The most effective of all Erasmus's writings — ripe with allusions, vignettes, and caricatures — the literary gem was not only an extremely intelligent and articulate response to pretentiousness of all sorts, it also proved to be spiritual dynamite, leaving monastic brothers and clergymen the objects of universal laughter.The book's purported narrator, the goddess Folly, proclaims herself to be the daughter of Youth and Wealth, nursed by Drunkenness and Ignorance. She is accompanied by such followers as Self-love, Pleasure, Flattery, and Sound Sleep.A clever mix of drollery and fantasy, fast-paced and lighthearted in tone, the work has proved to be a lively and valuable commentary on modern times. It remains, according to the great Dutch historian John Huizinga, "a masterpiece of humour and wise irony … something that no one else could have given to the world."

  • This is a review of this Kindle edition of "In Praise of Folly". It is not a review of Erasmus' work, except indirectly. I bought this version from Amazon and have read it through.
    Short version: this Kindle edition is probably worth 99 cents, but don't expect too much.
    1. It is an unaltered "reprint" in digital form of the 1876 London edition by Reeves & Turner and includes the charming woodcut illustrations.
    2. The translation (unattributed) is a version of Kennett's 1683 translation, which was updated in the 18th century and often reprinted without attribution, since it is in the public domain. It is a pretty free translation, not particularly accurate, but with a charming turn of phrase. Very lively. But if a 200 year old translation will annoy you, don't get this one. Buy either Clarence Miller's or Betty Radice's translations from the 1970s. Both are on Amazon, Miller on Kindle. Miller is the most thorough, with the best helpful footnotes, and IMHO the best version to get. Get the paperback, not the Kindle, if you want to easily see the notes. Radice may be more readable, depending on your tastes.
    3. As usual, this Kindle edition is full of scanning errors. ("Doesn't any human being proofread these things?" he asked foolishly.) Periods have disappeared, but the following capital letter will help. Words are misspelled: clumb for climb, Une for line, and so on. Most are obvious. One particularly egregious example is Just for lust, a mistake which will really make you think: "Why is Just such a bad thing?"
    In short, if you are willing to put up with errors and somewhat old-fashioned language, 99 cents may be a reasonable price for the convenience of having this classic on Kindle.

  • Bottom Line: This review is of the Kindle edition of Erasmus’s In Praise of folly. Mine has a very good intro written by Jean Asta and no additional footnotes or commentary. My opinions aside, Praise of Folly is an important book in Western Civilization. It is worthy of your time on its own merit. The style of the period tends to weigh the humor down and a lack of internal division can make it a difficult read.

    Unless you come to this book as a student of Western Literature or a related educated background having some context before you begin In Praise of Folly is critical. This is fairly well provided in the Introduction. From small things like; the original Latin title can be read as a playful pun directed at England’s Sir Thomas Moore. The two had become friends while Erasmus was visiting him in England and the book was begun if not entirely written under Moore’s roof. The historic context is that Erasmus was also in close contact with Martin Luther. Much of what Erasmus prints in In Praise of Folly is at the expense of some contemporary Roman Catholic practice. Luther had an expectation that its author would follow him into the Protestant schism. Luther would not take it well when Erasmus chose to remaina Catholic. Indeed he had been a monk and am ordained priest. He lived as a scholar, thinker and writer. He is best known as a central figure in the creation of the Humanist Philosophy.

    In Praise of Folly is written in the form of a speech given by the Goddess of Folly making her claim of the primacy of Folly in human affairs. Her argument is intentionally faulty and occasionally contradictory but this is all part of the satire. Typical of Folly’s argument is an early one wherein she states that all humans are born in an act of folly. This is a favorite passage of mine, if only because it is early in the book. By the end of the book, about 85 pages, intro included, Folly has touched upon every phase of human life and made some pointed jests some of the extremes and apparent contradictions in religious practice.

    It is said that humor does not travel well across time. There are parts to this short book that left me smiling. I cannot claim to have understood many references. There is near the end an appeal to a very aesthetics religious outlook even at the expense of what we now call the sciences. Does Folly/Erasmus intend this to be taken literally or sardonically? Annotation and or footnoting would be a major help in addressing that which is obscured by history or requiring additional context.

    By the end of Folly, I felt as though I had been reading a run on sentence. There are distinct parts built into the flow of Folly’s speech. These could have been sectioned off, if only by skipping a few lines between them. The author may not have them in the original. Either way, the cascade of words with no breaks and the heavy, wordy style of the day made this a less pleasant read than it was intended. The right scholars may be able to read this and savor every joke and twist. For the rest a few explanations would help. These are not the fault of the Erasmus, but a recommendation that a better edition might include this additional help.

  • “To know nothing is the sweetest life.”—Sophocles (Kindle Locations 263-264)

    “Give me any instance then of a man as wise as you can fancy him possible to be, that has spent all his younger years in poring upon books, and trudging after learning, in the pursuit whereof he squanders away the pleasantest time of his life in watching, sweat, and fasting; and in his latter days he never tastes one mouthful of delight, but is always stingy, poor, dejected, melancholy, burthensome to himself, and unwelcome to others, pale, lean, thin-jawed, sickly, contracting by his sedentariness such hurtful distempers as bring him to an untimely death, like roses plucked before they shatter. Thus have you, the draught of a wise man’s happiness, more the object of a commiserating pity, than of an ambitioning envy.” (Kindle Locations 701-706).

    Who knew there was so much to be said In Praise of Folly? Apparently there is.

    In his panegyric of that name, Erasmus, with tongue planted firmly in cheek, and sometimes sounding somewhat like H. L. Mencken to my mind’s ear, says it all. He’s converted me. Bring on passion and frivolity. Stuff reason and wisdom.

    Erasmus was a heretic’s heretic—as irascible a curmudgeon as they come. Gotta love ’im. But his writing can be more than a bit tedious to read. Long, long, extra long sentences. Counted 235 words in ONE sentence. I remember being scolded if my sentences went beyond twenty words.

    Recommendation: Every student—scholastic or autodidact—should welcome exposure to Erasmus. I’m glad I finally got around to reading him.

    “Farewell! live long, drink deep, be jolly, Ye most illustrious votaries of folly!” (Kindle Locations 1793-1794)

    Open Road Media. Kindle Edition, 1,828 Kindle Locations