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ePub Burnt Shadows: A Novel download

by Kamila Shamsie

ePub Burnt Shadows: A Novel download
Author:
Kamila Shamsie
ISBN13:
978-0312551872
ISBN:
0312551878
Language:
Publisher:
Picador; Original edition (April 27, 2009)
Category:
Subcategory:
Genre Fiction
ePub file:
1859 kb
Fb2 file:
1592 kb
Other formats:
txt docx mobi azw
Rating:
4.4
Votes:
958

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In Burnt Shadows, Kamila Samsie casts her imagination remarkably far and wide, through time and across . Kamila Shamsie is a writer of immense ambition and strength.

In Burnt Shadows, Kamila Samsie casts her imagination remarkably far and wide, through time and across continents. She understands a great deal about the ways in which the world's many tragedies and histories shape one another, and about how human beings can try to avoid being crushed by their fate and can discover their humanity, even in the fiercest combat zones of the age. Burnt Shadows is an absorbing novel that commands, in the reader, a powerful emotional and intellectual response.

The huge ambition of Kamila Shamsie's fifth novel is announced in the prologue. As an unnamed captive is unshackled and stripped naked in readiness for the anonymity of an orange jumpsuit, he wonders: "How did it come to this?" The vastness of the question as applied to a prisoner in Guantánamo is a challenge to which this epic yet skilfully controlled novel rises in oblique and unexpected ways.

Burnt Shadows - a book you shouldn't miss Kamila Shamsie has written an incredible book in Burnt Shadows. Beginning just before the dropping of the atomic bomb on Nagasaki and leaving you (I didn't feel that it ended because this is a book that stays with you) in the aftermath of 9-11, she. A Great Book Club Read I will recommend this book to my book club which read The Kite Runner last year. This is a sad, moving, intense, sweeping novel, with themes of connection and loss, trust and treason. The author's vivid descriptions carried me to Nagasaki, India,.

But Kamila Shamsie, who in Burnt Shadows does this so superbly, has done so much more.

A novel which seeks to encompass the dropping of the atomic bomb, the end of empire, partition, class, the cold war, the CIA supporting the mujahedeen, 9/11, the Taliban, Guantanamo Bay, terrorism, the fear of terrorism and the war in Afghanistan sets its sights high. The themes are no less impressive love, family, trust and betrayal, friendship, religion and a clash of cultures. But Kamila Shamsie, who in Burnt Shadows does this so superbly, has done so much more.

Kamila Shamsie (born 13 August 1973) is a British Pakistani writer and novelist who is known for her award-winning novel Home Fire. Shamsie was born into a well-to-do family of intellectuals in Pakistan

Kamila Shamsie (born 13 August 1973) is a British Pakistani writer and novelist who is known for her award-winning novel Home Fire. Shamsie was born into a well-to-do family of intellectuals in Pakistan. She was brought up in Karachi where she attended Karachi Grammar School.

Kamila Shamsie's Burnt Shadows is a story for our time by "a writer of. .Rick Simonson, Elliot Bay Book Company

Kamila Shamsie's Burnt Shadows is a story for our time by "a writer of immense ambition and strength. This is an absorbing novel that commands in the reader a powerful emotional and intellectual response" (Salman Rushdie). Connect with the author. Rick Simonson, Elliot Bay Book Company. Kamila Shamsie opens a vista onto the century we have just lived through-pointing out its terror and its solace.

Now it was clear: the buildings were too squat, their minarets too narrow. The Bosporus itself was a strait, not a river; it should have been a river. could a nation choose to discard the grace of Arabic lettering (generations of Ashraf calligraphers wept in their graves at the thought). No, nothing here conformed to his aesthetic; even the crumbling decay of this once grand city did not have the right tempo, the right texture, the right quality of sighing. It was all his fault they were here.

But Kamila Shamsie has thrown caution wildly to the wind

But Kamila Shamsie has thrown caution wildly to the wind. Burnt Shadows is a giant of novel, striding purposefully across Japan, India, Turkey, Pakistan, Afghanistan and America. So has Shamsie managed to release the post-9/11 novel from its self-imposed small canvas? Burnt Shadows opens as an unnamed man stands naked, waiting to be given the orange jumpsuit that will mark him as an inmate at Guantanamo. Immediately we soar back to Japan, August 1945, and the Nagasaki bomb.

Winner of the Anisfield-Wolf Book AwardAn Orange Prize FinalistNagasaki, August 9, 1945. Hiroko Tanaka watches her lover from the veranda as he leaves. Sunlight streams across Urakami Valley, and then the world goes white.

In the devastating aftermath of the atomic bomb, Hiroko leaves Japan in search of new beginnings. From Delhi, amid India's cry for independence from British colonial rule, to New York City in the immediate wake of 9/11, to the novel's astonishing climax in Afghanistan, a violent history casts its shadow the entire world over. Sweeping in its scope and mesmerizing in its evocation of time and place, this is a tale of love and war, of three generations, and three world-changing historic events. Kamila Shamsie's Burnt Shadows is a story for our time by "a writer of immense ambition and strength. . . . This is an absorbing novel that commands in the reader a powerful emotional and intellectual response" (Salman Rushdie).

  • I picked up this book for one of my college English classes with very low expectations. However, from the very fist page I was hooked. The writing style is like Khaled Hosseini which is great since he is one of my favorite authors! Honestly this book blew me away with the amount of emotion emanating from each of the characters. I loved how the story flowed from place to place over a lifetime. You experienced the characters as they grew and changed. It was amazing how the author was able to interlink each of the characters to each other either through history, relation, or current events. It was great to see how their relationships grew and faltered. This book definitely deserves five stars and I would highly recommend it.

  • What a twisted story it was. Story of people from different nations & cultures twisted together in the dance as long as life. Exploring their understanding of each other and failing, starting over and over and over. Great reminder to all of us on judgmental nature we have, putting tags on people just based on what media tells us and not based on our internal feeling or guidance. Great book to remind ourselves that we all are humans and all exploring how to be happy with the life we have and failing or winning for a bit and then failing again. No matter what religion we have or country we came from - it’s a journey of exploring how interconnected we are all here.

  • I don't often write reviews. But this book deserves it, and I'm writing this as soon as I read the last words of the story.
    I can't give the review it deserves without a bit of a spoiler alert, so be warned...
    Throughout this book, ethnic prejudice is a subtle subtext. The story is woven through decades, lives, people, countries, and you see different facets and faces of these feelings throughout the story's journey from one side of the globe to the other. Toward the end of the book, that subtext is no longer subtle -- it hits you right between the eyes.
    When the book ended, at first I was angry. How could the story just..stop? What about a happy ending, with all resolved? That only lasted a few minutes, because with just a little bit of time to think, and hopefully this book makes the reader think, you realize in our current time there could be no easy fix, no happy ending to some of these issues.
    It makes you go back through the book in your mind. I'm embarrassed to say that I realized I hadn't focused much on that subtle subtext, I recognized the sadness of the prejudice but had accepted it as an unfortunate fact of history and of life today, and focused on the story. Given the world hostilities, we become so accustomed to these feelings that while we may not agree with them we accept them as a fact of life.
    There is much sadness in this story, deep loss, repeatedly. But the central character of Hiroko stays with you. Once in a while you want the story to move a bit faster, but staying with it is worth the journey. It is beautifully told and poignant. I wish I could meet Hiroko and simply visit with her. This is one of the best of the many books I've read this year.

  • I will start by saying that I probably do not represent the average reader, since this book received a lot more attention than Broken Verses by the same author, that I enjoyed much more. Burnt Shadows is a complex novel that begins with Hiroko, a young Japanese woman who finds herself in the midst of the atomic bomb of Nagasaki. The story goes on to describe her journey to Delhi, where she connects with a British family on several different levels, while also finding the love of her life, who happens to be an Indian Muslim being displaced by the Hindu-Muslim riots of 1947. What follows is an entangled web of the bond between these very different families. There are many subjects interwoven into the narrative; those of war, terrorism and prejudice. There are many powerful and thought-provoking sentences, "..the shameful resilience of the human heart," and the author comes across as very knowledgable about different languages and cultures. Shamsie is one of the most gifted authors of today, in my opinion and therefore I am hesitant giving her work three stars, when I really hoped to give it five.
    My reasons are as follows: Despite having a good story line against a well-described and diverse background, I found myself unable to connect with the characters. The number of locations (Japan, India, Pakistan, America and Afghanistan), the time span of the story (60 years), and the number of main characters (7) was excessive, and took away from individual locations and characters. The advantage of a book like this is that a lot happens, and therefore the pace is rarely compromised; however for me, it's more important to share the joy and the pain of the characters, and mourn for their loss when they are gone, than to see a lot of different things happen. I did like the ending, and the portrayal of war and the destruction it brings at so many levels.

  • I heard an interview of Kamila Shamsie on BBC. It was an interesting interview. It is the first book by an Pakistani author that i have read and after the interview I certainly wanted to give it a try. Another very interesting aspect was it spans both our countries. We are culturally, emotionally and often even in our thought process. The atomic bomb and experiences there of, are a bit shallow but one seldom reads social emotional scars of the bomb. While Hiroko was strong, I couldn't understand some of her actions. Raza ... Hmmm. I would have liked to read more on Hiroko than Afghanistan. That part of the book didn't appeal to me because I found it unrealistic. There was no need for Raza to be larger than life and keep doing all sacrifices. In spite of that I fully enjoyed reading it and have recommended it to friends

  • Kamila Shamsie wrecks me every time! I read Home Fires earlier (also an excellent read) and the way everything comes together at the end, I just ache that the story is over and really want to re-read it right away. I love the character development, the complex plot lines, the rich descriptive scenes she creates.