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ePub All for Love: A Novel download

by Dan Jacobson

ePub All for Love: A Novel download
Author:
Dan Jacobson
ISBN13:
978-0805081039
ISBN:
0805081038
Language:
Publisher:
Metropolitan Books; First U.S. Edition edition (September 5, 2006)
Category:
Subcategory:
Genre Fiction
ePub file:
1657 kb
Fb2 file:
1667 kb
Other formats:
txt lit doc mobi
Rating:
4.3
Votes:
833

All for love : a novel. All for love : a novel. by. Jacobson, Dan. Publication date.

All for love : a novel. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

Dan Jacobson is the author of some twenty books-novels, short-story collections, travel writing, and ing the acclaimed memoir Heshel's Kingdom. He is the winner of the John Llewellyn Rhys Award and the Somerset Maugham Award, among many others

Dan Jacobson is the author of some twenty books-novels, short-story collections, travel writing, and ing the acclaimed memoir Heshel's Kingdom. He is the winner of the John Llewellyn Rhys Award and the Somerset Maugham Award, among many others. He lives and writes in London.

All for Love book Dan Jacobson (born March 7, 1929 in Johannesburg, South Africa) is a novelist, short story writer, critic and essayist.

Its style is greasy, heavy and there are s I'm really sorry for what I am about to do, I am not the typical hormonal reader who appreciates trolling authors whenever some novel upsets her (and yet, here we are). Dan Jacobson (born March 7, 1929 in Johannesburg, South Africa) is a novelist, short story writer, critic and essayist.

Dan Jacobson's latest novel, his first for 12 years, is of a kind that makes you query definitions. With All for Love Jacobson does us a favour by blurring these not-very-useful definitions to the point where they no longer matter, while at the same time telling a fascinating story

Dan Jacobson's latest novel, his first for 12 years, is of a kind that makes you query definitions. With All for Love Jacobson does us a favour by blurring these not-very-useful definitions to the point where they no longer matter, while at the same time telling a fascinating story. Whether this is the most historical of historical novels - it comes with the academic apparatus of footnotes and source ascription - or whether to the purist it's even a novel at all doesn't matter; this story of love, passion, duplicity, forgery, imprisonment, rescue, madness (alleged), romantic obsession and remorseless reality is a thoroughly good read.

Howard Jacobson is the author of eight previous novels, including The Mighty Walzer (winner of the 1999 Everyman . The Act of Love sometimes reads more like an act of revenge.

Howard Jacobson is the author of eight previous novels, including The Mighty Walzer (winner of the 1999 Everyman Wodehouse Award for comic writing), and several works of nonfiction. The novel is a hodge-podge of human emotions as the writer tries to explore the psychological aspects of love, obsession, and jealouusy

The tale of a scandalous affair between a Hapsburg princess and a lowly cavalryman, it was the greatest European scandal of the day: she was Louise of Saxe-Coburg, the wife of a prince, the daughter of King Leopold II of Belgium. Her lover was Second Lieutenant G?za Mattachich, ten years younger than the princess, an undistinguished subaltern of dubious origin and extravagant ambition.

2005) A novel by Dan Jacobson. Awards The Man Booker Prize Best Novel (nominee). She was a princess, the daughter of King Leopold II of the Belgians, the wife of a prince and a familiar figure in the court of the aged Emperor, Franz Joseph of Austria-Hungary. Her lover was Second Lieutenant Geza Mattachich.

Dan Jacobson was born 7 March 1929, in Johannesburg, South Africa . His 2005 novel All For Love was long listed for the Man Booker Prize.

Dan Jacobson was born 7 March 1929, in Johannesburg, South Africa, where his parents' families had come to avoid the persecution of Jews and to escape poverty in their European homelands. His father, Hymann Michael Jacobson, was born in Ilūkste, Latvia, in 1885. After helping a boy rescue his book bag from a filthy trash bin, he went to school unaware that he had gotten dirt on the back of his legs. When his teacher mentioned the dirt in front of the class, several of the boys made fun of him and led the class in ignoring him for six to eight weeks.

Rudolph’s widow, Stephanie, was the sister of Jacobson’s heroine, Princess Louise of Belgium. Yet although Louise’s catastrophic involvement with an upstart commoner had echoes of Mayerling, it becomes, in Jacobson’s sardonic version, more of a black comedy. Romantic, preposterously theatrical,.

Jacobson’s beautiful, rhythmic writing promises a kind of dank eroticis. In the very beginning of this rich and riveting novel, Felix Quinn defines his kind of lov. e makes his case well. normously funn. gem of technical. Jacobson conjures a twisted yet sophisticated love story here, walking a thin line between humor and erotica and often blending the two. -Booklist. An impressively sustained, and unusually intense, literary experiment. Bright and beautiful sparks fly off him.

A brilliant reconstruction of the operatic--and catastrophic--romance of a Hapsburg princess and a lowly cavalryman
  • Mr. Jakobson in the Author's Note wrote, that he "... was immediately attracted to the idea of writing about it...“, „it" being a footnote in European history, the livelong out-of-marriage affair between Princess Louise von Sachsen-Coburg, daughter of King Leopold II of the Belgians and Geza von Mattachich-Keglevic, a Kroatian Army Lieutenant, nine or ten years her junior. Fascinating material for a novel indeed, but Mr. Jacobson managed to mess it up completely. Littering the book with footnotes to show how thoroughly he worked himself through his source materials, he never gets into the romantic novel mode, though there is lots of romance in the beginning to draw from and more than one shadow of tragedy looming, debts and flights, a duel with pistols and saber swords, secret military court proceedings, a dungeon for the young man, psychiatric authorities and insane asylums for the princess, nocturnal liberation…

    Instead the book constantly sways between a sloppy documentation with no small number of downright mistakes and an all-seeing and rather derisive author's projections of what was said and done out of which most squalid motive on any side. Mr Jakobson seemingly hates his protagonists and never leaves out a chance to sneer at them, dwelling scornfully on every fault, mentally and physically, he can find. Vae victis! Now, hindsight is an exact science…

    To readers capable of the German language I'd suggest "Die Liaison. Roman einer europäischen Tragödie" by Matray Maria and Answald Krüger or it's translation into English, "The Liaison", which does not omit the faults and idiosyncracies of the lovers - and they quite had some.

  • I was hoping this would be a novel based - however loosely - on historical events, embellished with the usual projections of what the protagonists might have felt, seen, eaten, said or done. The reviews had promised "an extraordinary and compelling story...", "brilliantly and memorably re-created by English novelist and critic Dan Jacobson in this scrupulous yet highly imaginative novel"... "the writing in it is marked by precision and pungent detail"... so of course I had high expectations.

    Unfortunately, there were so many factual and linguistic errors in the first few dozen pages that I got increasingly frustrated. On page 66, I finally gave up since I no longer viewed this as an intellectually stimulating read. Writers who use many foreign words usually want to either evoke a more 'authentic' feel of the outlandish setting of the novel or show off their own linguistic skills. No matter whether the author himself speaks German - at least the book's editors might have checked some of the spelling.

    The Italian name of Venice is wrongly spelled "Venetia" (instead of Venezia, p.19), the main protagonist's title is given as "Louise von Sachse-Coburg" (instead of Sachsen-Coburg, p.24). Other errors like "Mittelschuler" (instead of Mittelschüler, p. 19), "Stadtsoper" (instead of "Staatsoper", p.39) or "gräfin" (instead of "Gräfin", p. 66) might just be typos. And citing Sigmund Freud's work "Studies on Hysteria" as "Studies in Hysteria" might just be an alternative translation [...]Something that might happen to the best of writers...

    But then there is that reference to "Egon Klimt striking a price with a consumptive prostitute whom he is eager to paint in the flat desperate colors he is making his own". Interesting. This must be Egon SCHIELE, right? Dan Jacobson couldn't have meant Gustav Klimt, famous for his decorative Jugendstil paintings dominated by gold and bright colours, could he? But that's odd, since Schiele was born in 1890 and Jacobson is talking about Vienna in 1896 at this point - a six-year-old painting prostitutes would have been quite unusual, I think.

    And then, further down on the same page, he evokes "Ludwig von Wittgenstein" as a boy on a walk with his governess. I think he probably didn't mean the Renaissance count Ludwig von Wittgenstein (1532-1605,[...]) but the philosopher and author of the "Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus". He was from one of Europe's wealthiest families but not an aristocrat - therefore, his name had no "von", he was just "Ludwig Wittgenstein" [...]. Simple mistakes, right? Who cares about a "von" in a name anyway?

    But then what about calling Franz Joseph I., Emperor of Austria, "king"? (p60) Or referring to him as "Franz Josef" instead of "Franz Joseph" throughout the book?

    I gave up on page 66 since I'd become bored by the sloppiness of the book's research. The story of the aristocratic love triangle and subsequent imprisonment, bankruptcy and madness of the protagonists would have been interesting, of course, but the prose really did not make up for the careless treatment of the historical setting.

    Instead, I entertained myself making analogies for an entire afternoon... and decided I'd probably one day publish a historical novel about the 19th century since I'd always been interested in the reign of Empress Viktoria, her beloved Prince Albert of Sax-Coburg, the work of famous writers like Sir Charles Dickens or W.B. Tennyson, the rise of operas and theatres like the Old Vik, and the big changes that the Industrial Revolution wrought on cities like Mancester... Writing historical novels can't be that difficult after all, seeing that "All for Love" got published, too...

  • I've often heard it said that one's ability to take responsibility for one's own actions is the highest indicator of self-esteem. Don't tell that to the protagonists of this book. Certainly we the readers are entertained by their devastating choices, but it's their inability to relent in the pursuit of the inevitable consequences that fascinates. I can only liken the behavior of these people to the current exploits of Britney Spears. However, I don't think Ms. Spears is as enamored with the acting out of the dramatization of her own saga as much as Princess Louise and her erstwhile lover Mattachich. Once on top of the world, Britney is insistent on degrading herself, but in the pursuit of pleasure. For the lovers of this historical novel, pleasure never really comes into it.

    I believe the book's titular "love" was never part of their endgame (sorry to disappoint!) They are two united pilgrims of imagination, seeking to discover what lies beyond the strictures of class in Hapsburg Vienna. Once they find it, puzzlingly, they don't stop. They continue on in an intractable gyre of indigence and affliction of their own making, only ending, in this life at least, in death. While on the one hand the reader marvels at their brazen, obscene commitment to finish what they audaciously start, one cannot help but ponder, was it all worth it?