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ePub Moby Dick: Or the Whale (Tor Classics) download

by Herman Melville

ePub Moby Dick: Or the Whale (Tor Classics) download
Author:
Herman Melville
ISBN13:
978-0812541564
ISBN:
0812541561
Language:
Publisher:
Tor Classics; T.V. Edition edition (March 15, 1998)
Category:
Subcategory:
Genre Fiction
ePub file:
1175 kb
Fb2 file:
1362 kb
Other formats:
doc azw doc docx
Rating:
4.4
Votes:
828

Home Herman Melville Moby Dick; Or, The Whale. First: According to magnitude I divide the whales into three primary BOOKS(subdivisible into CHAPTERS), and these shall comprehend them all,both small and large

Home Herman Melville Moby Dick; Or, The Whale. Moby dick; or, the whale, . 3. First: According to magnitude I divide the whales into three primary BOOKS(subdivisible into CHAPTERS), and these shall comprehend them all,both small and large. I. THE FOLIO WHALE; II. the OCTAVO WHALE; III. the DUODECIMO WH. ALE.

Moby-Dick, or, the Whale book . You didn’t like Herman Melville’s Moby Dick? You didn't even finish it? I’m here to tell you, that’s okay. It is, after all, classic literature, and must be experienced on multiple levels, if at all. So, what’s the point of Moby Dick? Is it about obsession?

Herman Melville was born in August 1, 1819, in New York City, the son of a merchant.

Herman Melville was born in August 1, 1819, in New York City, the son of a merchant. Only twelve when his father died bankrupt, young Herman tried work as a bank clerk, as a cabin-boy on a trip to Liverpool, and as an elementary schoolteacher, before shipping in January 1841 on the whaler Acushnet, bound for the Pacific. But we don't just learn about the sperm whale but about all whales. Then we learn about whaling and its nobility. Here is where it gets very interesting.

Moby-Dick; or, The Whale is an 1851 novel by American writer Herman Melville

Moby-Dick; or, The Whale is an 1851 novel by American writer Herman Melville. The book is sailor Ishmael's narrative of the obsessive quest of Ahab, captain of the whaling ship Pequod, for revenge on Moby Dick, the giant white sperm whale that on the ship's previous voyage bit off Ahab's leg at the knee. A contribution to the literature of the American Renaissance, the work's genre classifications range from late Romantic to early Symbolist.

Moby Dick Or The Whale. Chapter 1 Loomings Call me Ishmael.

The Confidence-Man Herman Melville Long considered the author's strangest novel . This novel represented a departure for Herman Melville, a satirical and socially acute work that was to be a further step away from his sea novels

The Confidence-Man Herman Melville Long considered the author's strangest novel, this work is a comic allegory aimed at the optimism and materialism of mid-18th-century America. This novel represented a departure for Herman Melville, a satirical and socially acute work that was to be a further step away from his sea novels. Some have argued that the book was a joke on the readers loyal to his sea stories, but if so, it backfired.

Midnight, Forecastle. CHAPTER 41. Moby Dick. Touching that monstrous bulk of the whale or ork we have received nothing certain. They grow exceeding fat, insomuch that an incredible quantity of oil will be extracted out of one whale. CHAPTER 42. The Whiteness of the Whale.

Librivox recording of Moby Dick, or the Whale, by Herman Melville. Stewart Mills has done a wonderful job reading this classic tale. He reads in a clear, confident, and eminently listenable voice. His delivery is expressive and is enhanced by different voices for each character. Moby Dick is one of those books I've always meant to read, but somehow never got around to it. Now that I have the opportunity to listen to audio books while driving, it's such a treat to immerse myself in wonderful classics such as this.

A nineteenth-century tale of life aboard a New England whaling ship whose captain is obsessed with the pursuit of a large white whale
  • I read Moby-Dick several times in college almost forty years ago. Now I'm taking a night class and reading it with life experience of forty years. Awe is the feeling that constantly gets evoked as I read. Why awe?

    Capacious. That is the word that repeats again and again in my head. Moby-Dick is a vibrantly colored hot air balloon that keeps growing in size as I read it. First, Melville's subject is the sperm whale, the largest creature on earth. But we don't just learn about the sperm whale but about all whales. Then we learn about whaling and its nobility. Here is where it gets very interesting. We participate in whaling, its skill, equipment, courage, risks and economy AND about how it results in the gruesome destruction of the whale. We feel the horror inflicted on the whales and we feel the nobility of the activity that slaughters them. Melville doesn't allow us to avert our eyes either to the daring of whaling or to the viciousness of the slaughter. That is where the book inflates even more because he holds both perspectives equally which is a much larger place than if he had taken sides.

    The book also foreshadows modernism by using a variety of narrative techniques; theater, pure narration, encyclopedic explanations and subjective interior monologues. Melville is constantly breaking up the narrative with omniscient recitations of fascinating information about his subject matter. And like Ulysses or the Waste Land, he piles on the reference to Shakespeare, the Greeks, Christianity and the Hebrew traditions.

    There are many references with regard to Ahab and the Whale regarding evil and Satan. Yet Ahab has great respect and reverence for Moby Dick. Ahab himself knows he is obsessed and but can have great compassion like his feelings for the lowly addled Pip. So yes there is evil afoot in the book but it isn't the kind that that creates simple polar opposites. As Ahab describes Moby-Dick (has) `an inscrutable malice sinewing through it' that describe the book as well. There is evil and there is also goodness that coexists in the book making the reader feel that he has to take sides. If the reader resists this temptation he or she will experience the awe of a deep and ever expanding mystery.

  • This review is for the Norton Critical 150th Anniversary Edition. I've read several other versions, as this is one of my favorite books, and this edition would easily be in my Top editions to own. Despite being a paperback and filled with supplemental material, I was surprised at how compact it is. The annotations and illustrations really add to your reading enjoyment of this classic novel.

  • A very enjoyable listen. Well narrated and takes a long time to get through, my two main requirements for an audiobook :). I tried reading this when I was young (luckily never given it as an assignment) and it is a tough read. Herman Melville was a master of the poetic phrase and it is beautiful to listen to but a trudge to read imho. A true American classic of the dangers of revenge and mob mentality. It also provides a time-machine like glimpse into the powerful American whaling industry and once again demonstrates the American concept (for good or bad) that whatever the world does we will outstrip it. I was especially pleased with the authors (narrators) view on the belief that mankind could never kill enough whales to endanger their numbers in the ocean and provides an interesting analogy separating their killing from the American Buffalo. Sadly, little did he know of where technology and seafaring were headed just a few decade later. I spent .99 for the kindle book and got the audio for free so I count it as money well spent.

  • Nathaniel Philbrick is a brilliant writer. His prose is flowing and clear, and he has chosen his excerpts from this towering work well. His enthusiasm for MOBY DICK is infectious and he has managed to overcome my hesitation about jumping into a long work of nineteenth century fiction. I have started reading MOBY DICK, and I will persevere!

    So why four stars and not five? The final chapter of this wonderful book seemed vague and the concluding paragraphs felt like a contradiction to every valid point in the previous pages. It is almost as though the editor said to Philbrick: "Geez, you can't end the book on such a dark note. Put in a rainbow, or something." Melville was a complex, needy and troubled person, as this book recognizes. He was probably bipolar (although the word is never mentioned), and certainly had a strong streak of depression in his personality and life experiences. That Melville somehow clung to youthful dreams through the end of his life is just a little too improbable. That a scrap of paper found by Melville's family after his death is the evidence of such hope is very weak evidence indeed. That he managed to live out his life in obscurity after failing to achieve family harmony, financial success or artistic recognition does not suggest hope as much as resignation. Philbrick is certainly entitled to this opinion, although for me, as a reader of this tiny gem of a book, it seemed a falsified conclusion, unworthy of all of the sensitive and almost poetic content in the rest of the book.