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ePub Gates of Fire: An Epic Novel of the Battle of Thermopylae download

by Steven Pressfield

ePub Gates of Fire: An Epic Novel of the Battle of Thermopylae download
Author:
Steven Pressfield
ISBN13:
978-0553580532
ISBN:
0553580531
Language:
Publisher:
Bantam; 8.1.1999 edition (August 31, 1999)
Category:
Subcategory:
Genre Fiction
ePub file:
1175 kb
Fb2 file:
1614 kb
Other formats:
mobi txt azw lrf
Rating:
4.8
Votes:
473

Steven Pressfield does more than just tell the story of what happened during the battle of Thermopylae (which in and of itself is a phenomenal story), he uses it as a backdrop for studying the psychological makeup of what a soldier should be. There is more philosophy in this book than one would expect from a war novel, but this is why I consider it both insightful, and at times inspirin. ven after the fifth read. This is a great book for anyone who is thinking of, or soon will be joining military service.

Steven Pressfield brings the battle of Thermopylae to brilliant life, and he does for that war what Charles Frazier . Steven Pressfield is a great writer, but with Gates of Fire, he reaches a pitch of sublimity that rivals the gods. OK, enough with the hero worship. Seriously, this book is amazing.

Steven Pressfield brings the battle of Thermopylae to brilliant life, and he does for that war what Charles Frazier did for the Civil War in Cold Mountain. an exciting, romantic, star-crossed story. As a former Marine, and a bit of a classics buff, Gates of Fire speaks to me on so many levels. It's one of the absolute best portrayals in fiction, of the ideals of duty, patriotism, and manly honor. It's also highly realistic in it's depiction of the psyche of the warrior.

Gates of Fire: An Epic Novel of the Battle of Thermopylae Steven Pressfield An epic heroic novel, set in Ancient Greece, and based on the true story of the Battle of Thermopylae in 480 B. the forces of the Persian Empire under King Xerxes, numbering according to Herodotus two million men, bridged the Hellespont and marched in their myriads to invade and enslave Greece. In a desperate delaying action, a picked force of three hundred Spartans was dispatched to the pass of Thermopylae, where the confines between mountains and sea were so narrow that the Persian multitudes and their cavalry would be at least partially neutralized.

The Authentic Swing: Notes From the Writing of a First Novel. by Steven Pressfield. The Story Behind THE LEGEND OF BAGGER VANCE If you've read his books THE WAR OF ART and TURNING PRO, you know that for thirty years Steven Pressfield (GATES OF FIRE, THE AFGHAN CAMPAIGN et. wrote spec novel after spec novel before any publisher took him. I'm Not for Everyone.

Gates of Fire is a 1998 historical fiction novel by Steven Pressfield that recounts the Battle of Thermopylae through Xeones, a perioikoi (free but non-citizen inhabitant of Sparta) born in Astakos, and one of only three Greek survivors of the battle. Gates of Fire is on the Commandant of the Marine Corps' Reading list. It is taught at West Point, the United States Naval Academy, and at the Marine Corps The Basic School.

Электронная книга "Gates of Fire: An Epic Novel of the Battle of Thermopylae", Steven Pressfield

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Steven Pressfield Gates of Fire: An Epic Novel of the Battle of Thermopylae Historical Note In 480 . It is said that on the eve of battle, he was told by a native of Trachis that the Persian archers were so numerous that, when they fired their volleys, the mass of arrows blocked out the sun. Dienekes, however, quite undaunted by this prospect, remarked with a laugh, Good. Then we'll have our battle in the shade. Herodotus, the histories.

some content may be lost due to the binding of the book.

Pressfield, Steven; ebrary, Inc. Publication date. American Historical Fiction, Fiction - Historical, Fiction, Historical - General, Fiction, Historical, Thermopylae, Battle of, Greece, 480 . New York : Bantam Books. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; americana. some content may be lost due to the binding of the book.

Gates of Fire: An Epic Novel of the Battle of Thermopylae1.

NATIONAL BESTSELLER - "An incredibly gripping, moving, and literate work of art, rarely does an author manage to re-create a moment in history with such mastery, authority, and psychological insight." - Nelson DeMilleAt Thermopylae, a rocky mountain pass in northern Greece, the feared and admired Spartan soldiers stood three hundred strong. Theirs was a suicide mission, to hold the pass against the invading millions of the mighty Persian army.Day after bloody day they withstood the terrible onslaught, buying time for the Greeks to rally their forces. Born into a cult of spiritual courage, physical endurance, and unmatched battle skill, the Spartans would be remembered for the greatest military stand in history--one that would not end until the rocks were awash with blood, leaving only one gravely injured Spartan squire to tell the tale...."A novel that is intricate and arresting and, once begun, almost impossible to put down." - Daily News "A timeless epic of man and war... Pressfield has created a new classic deserving a place beside the very best of the old." - Stephen Coonts
  • There are no words in the English language that can truly capture my feelings about this book. I read it, at least, a couple of times a year. Steven Pressfield is a great writer, but with Gates of Fire, he reaches a pitch of sublimity that rivals the gods. OK, enough with the hero worship. Seriously, this book is amazing. As a former Marine, and a bit of a classics buff, Gates of Fire speaks to me on so many levels. It's one of the absolute best portrayals in fiction, of the ideals of duty, patriotism, and manly honor. It's also highly realistic in it's depiction of the psyche of the warrior. But I think, most importantly, it's just a great story; full of action, adventure, unrequited love, sacrifice, honor, joy, pain, humor and sadness.

    Other's may disagree, but if you're a fan of military history or fiction, or even if you're just interested in Classical Western History, you will love this book.

  • I came across this book while i was fighting in Afghanistan. A friend recommended it after he'd been given it by a fellow soldier who'd been sent a copy from Canada. Then my platoon had two copies. They were passed around from man to man and all 40 of us read it in the space of a month or two. While reading this book in front of my tent four other guys would walk by, stop and we'd end up discussing the themes of the story for the next two hours or until the next call out. This story provoked hundreds of hours of discussion while we lived and fought in the dusty, bloody wasteland of Panjwai.

    We related to the attitudes of the Lacedomonians, their moral lessons, their frequent debates on relevant themes important to their lives. The author's depictions of phalanx warfare raised my heart rate and felt so visceral as I sat in the dust and sun of the afghan mornings. We related to this story in a way i've never related to a story before. The sand, sweat, blood, feelings of combat, thoughts of mortality and deep discussions that men at war share are timeless.

    On returning to Canada I bought 6 copies of this book and gave them to several men who i thought might appreciate such a powerful re-imagining of this famous historic event. Gates of fire now stands tall on my list of the greatest stories i've ever read and will re-read again.

  • Honorable lives that will live forever as symbols of selfless greatness.
    An awful waste.

    These are the two thoughts I am left with after reading this book. This book would just be an amazingly entertaining read except for the fact it is based in truth.

    This awful, horrible butchery actually happened.

    Men actually lived like this - and do live like this. In a culture of war and bloodshed and honor.

    At the same time I stand in near-silent awe and gratitude for the example their lives give, I also shudder at the waste of it.

    More than any other "war" book I have read, this book contrasts those two sides of war. The glorious honor that reflects the best of humankind, and the tragedy of a wasted life that could have offered so much more life if it had been left to ripen.

    One very interesting thing about this book is it discussed the psychology of the soldier in a way I (who have never been a soldier) never considered before. It is interesting, but theoretical to me. I pray it never becomes real. And I have both envy and pity in my heart for those to whom it is not theory.

  • This is a superb retelling of the Battle of Thermopylae and of the protagonist's life leading up to the battle. I note that it took a little while for the book to fully hook me, but then I was captured by it. The scenes about the soldiers' training, the scenes of actual battle, and most particularly the scenes after or between battles, are all excellent. The discussions of fear, and of how officers and soldiers should behave are likewise excellent. The characters are surprisingly diverse (including among them servants who have varying degrees of loyalty to the Spartans, plus a Spartan boy who is not by nature a warrior though he is being trained to be one, a merchant, a supreme young warrior, and an older platoon leader). Unsurprisingly the book portrays the Spartan warriors as heroic and honorable--and does so extremely well. But it did surprise me that it also includes very strong portrayals of women as secondary characters, the strongest depictions of women I've met in fiction for a while. The women don't fight in the battles, yet are courageous and compassionate, intelligent and influential. I was also very taken by the portrayal of Leonidas, the Spartan king who commanded at Thermopylae. One of my favorite speeches in the book is addressed to Xerxes, the King of Persia, and contrasts Xerxes with Leonidas: "I will tell His Majesty what a king is. A king does not abide within his tent while his men bleed and die upon the field. A king does not dine while his men go hungry, nor sleep when they stand at watch upon the wall. A king does not command his men's loyalty through fear nor purchase it with gold; he earns their love by the sweat of his back and the pains he endures for their sake...." A wonderful book.

  • I don't read much historical fiction. I enjoy the picture painted by real events the most. In this case I learned much about the dynamics of ancient Greek culture and how it created the conditions to allow them to repel the east and preserve themselves and our western civilization. One of the profound conclusions drawn by one of the main characters is that love is the opposite of fear. It's love that is the root for sacrifice in the face of overwhelming odds. This book is well-written and it was appropriately organized and structured so as to be believable. He humanized all parties and you might think it means he's saying that it would not be so catastrophic if they relented to xerxes. In the end its clear which side, was the most virtuous and the most worthy of victory and perseverance. I found myself lifted up and returned to that place a man should stand. I highly recommend this book.