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by Michael Stanislawski,Vladimir Jabotinsky

ePub The Five: A Novel Of Jewish Life In Turn-of-the-century Odessa download
Author:
Michael Stanislawski,Vladimir Jabotinsky
ISBN13:
978-0801442667
ISBN:
0801442664
Language:
Publisher:
Cornell Univ Pr (May 1, 2005)
Category:
Subcategory:
Genre Fiction
ePub file:
1583 kb
Fb2 file:
1371 kb
Other formats:
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Rating:
4.5
Votes:
671

Vladimir Jabotinsky the brilliant novelist anticipates the career of Ze'ev Jabotinsky the Zionist leader who . This is an often poetic novel that gives an insight into the lives of upper middle class Jews at the turn of the century.

Vladimir Jabotinsky the brilliant novelist anticipates the career of Ze'ev Jabotinsky the Zionist leader who urged the evacuation of the Jews from Eastern Europe. Ruth Wisse, Harvard University). I found it lacking in connective detail, with actually very little in the way of "Jewish Life". The author seems to have read Anna Karenina and much of the story line revolves around the social interaction of these folks in that sort of vacuous way in which Anna seems to operate.

The Five: A Novel of Jewish Life in Turn-of-the-Century Odessa The book is Jabotinsky's elegaic paean to the Odessa of his youth, a place that no longer exists.

The Five: A Novel of Jewish Life in Turn-of-the-Century Odessa. by Vladimir Jabotinsky and Michael Stanislawski. The Five is an captivating novel of the decadent fin-de-siècle written by Vladimir Jabotinsky (1880–1940), a controversial leader in the Zionist movement whose literary talents, until now, have largely gone unrecognized by Western readers. The author deftly paints a picture of Russia's decay and decline-a world permeated with sexuality, mystery, and intrigue. The book is Jabotinsky's elegaic paean to the Odessa of his youth, a place that no longer exists. It tells the story of an upper-middle-class Jewish family, the Milgroms, at the turn of the century.

The book is Jabotinsky's elegaic paean to the Odessa of his youth, a. .Vladimir Jabotinsky was arguably the most controversial Jewish leader and public personality of the twentieth century

The book is Jabotinsky's elegaic paean to the Odessa of his youth, a place that no longer exists. eISBN: 978-0-8014-7163-6. Vladimir Jabotinsky was arguably the most controversial Jewish leader and public personality of the twentieth century.

Vladimir Jabotinsky’s The Five opens and unfolds in almost classic 19th-century fashion. Maryusa, the high-spirited young woman, is one of five children in the Milgrom family, assimilated Jews living in the Ukrainian port of Odessa, a sophisticated polyglot city. Their house is open, practically day and night, to Maryusa’s sightseers, students and wouldbe students, young people about town, and the journalist narrator. Over time the narrator becomes deeply involved with the family and the Milgrom children, the five of the title.

Youth - Serezha - In the literary circle - Around Marusya - The world of business - Lika - Marko - My porter - The alien - Along Deribasov Street - A many-sided soul - The arsenal on Moldavanka - Something like the Decameron - Inserted chapter, not intended. for the reader - Confession on Langeron - Signor and mademoiselle - The godseeker - Potemkin day - Potemkin night - The wrong way - Broad Jewish natures - One more confession - Visiting Marusya - Mademoiselle and signor - Gomorrah - Something bad - The end of Marusya

The Five is an captivating novel of the decadent fin-de-siècle written by Vladimir .

The Five is an captivating novel of the decadent fin-de-siècle written by Vladimir Jabotinsky (1880-1940), a controversial leader in the Zionist movement whose literary talents, until now, have largely gone unrecognized by Western readers. The beginning of this tale of bygone days in Odessa dates to the dawn of the twentieth century. At that time we used to refer to the first years of this period as the 'springtime, ' meaning a social and political awakening.

Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read.

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The book is Jabotinsky's elegaic paean to the Odessa of his youth, a place that no longer exists.

The book is Jabotinsky's elegaic paean to the Odessa of his youth, a place that no longer exists. Title The Five: A Novel of Jewish Life in Turn-Of-The-Century Odessa. Author Vladimir Jabotinsky.

Katz ; introduction by Michael Stanislawski. Jabotinsky, Vladimir, 1880-1940. Mademoiselle and signor Gomorrah Something bad The end of Marusya The beginning of Torik L'envoi. Katz, Michael R. ISBN.

The five : a novel of Jewish life in turn-of-the-century Odessa, Vladimir Jabotinsky ; translated from the Russian and annotated by Michael R. Katz ; introduction by Michael Stanislawski. Publication Library Call Number: PG3470. Ithaca : Cornell University Press, 2005 Includes bibliographical references (p. 203). 080144489032 (pbk. : alk. paper).

"The beginning of this tale of bygone days in Odessa dates to the dawn of the twentieth century. At that time we used to refer to the first years of this period as the ‘springtime,’ meaning a social and political awakening. For my generation, these years also coincided with our own personal springtime, in the sense that we were all in our youthful twenties. And both of these springtimes, as well as the image of our carefree Black Sea capital with acacias growing along its steep banks, are interwoven in my memory with the story of one family in which there were five children: Marusya, Marko, Lika, Serezha, and Torik."—from The Five

The Five is an captivating novel of the decadent fin-de-siècle written by Vladimir Jabotinsky (1880–1940), a controversial leader in the Zionist movement whose literary talents, until now, have largely gone unrecognized by Western readers. The author deftly paints a picture of Russia’s decay and decline—a world permeated with sexuality, mystery, and intrigue. Michael R. Katz has crafted the first English-language translation of this important novel, which was written in Russian in 1935 and published a year later in Paris under the title Pyatero.

The book is Jabotinsky’s elegaic paean to the Odessa of his youth, a place that no longer exists. It tells the story of an upper-middle-class Jewish family, the Milgroms, at the turn of the century. It follows five siblings as they change, mature, and come to accept their places in a rapidly evolving world. With flashes of humor, Jabotinsky captures the ferment of the time as reflected in political, social, artistic, and spiritual developments. He depicts with nostalgia the excitement of life in old Odessa and comments poignantly on the failure of the dream of Jewish assimilation within the Russian empire.

  • Excellent book, surprising given the historical personality of Jabotinsky, who was a fierce Zionist leader and a man of action. While admirable as a political leader, Jabotinsky seemed steely and dour. Here he appears completely different: a cultured man with accute pyschological insight and a lot of humor - and surprising nostalgia. The narrator, though clearly modeled on him, very much stays in the background and concentrates on the major characters, the five Milgrom youngsters who are his friends and enter adulthood. This happens mostly in Odessa, the beautiful and cosmospolitan Black Sea port city (now in Ukraine, then in the Russain Empire) where the largely secular Jewish family Milgrom resides, over a 10-12 year period, roughly from 1903 to 1915 or 1916. The destinies of the five Milgrom offspring are expounded upon with little overt meditation, which makes the insights (shining through conversations) all the more powerful.

    The only sour note pertains not to the author, but to the man who wrote the preface of the book, Michael Stanislawski. This man is a Columbia University professor whose professional strategy is to make up for his lack of insight through arrogance, graphomania and churning garbage hostile to Israel - in sum, a typical US humanities academic shark. The preface is thus unsurprisingly stupid and venomous. Whatever this man has to say belongs in a Stalinist magazine, not as a preface to Jabotinsky. Skip the preface and read the novel.

  • The narrator tells you the story in well-shaped chapters that could have been successive newspaper columns. You are moved along in his storytelling, even if the action is so subtle as to be vague (did they or didn't they? type of vague) He is writing fiction about events of more than a hundred years ago, but some of the topics are still contemporary. The Jewish characters are figuring out how much to assimilate and realizing that they will still be subject to antisemitism. People are trying on all sorts of ideologies. Young adults are figuring out how and where they belong, who to love. I loved this book and finished it quickly. Be sure to get this edition. It would be interesting to write a paper comparing this work to Proust, to The Great Gatsby, to DH Lawrence, and even to Catcher in the Rye! I didn't understand a lot of the history and didn't bother looking up the geography, but that did not get in the way of my enjoying this book. Read it.

  • Anyone who thinks they know a thing or two about the author's politics, philosophy and place in history and then reads this terrific Russian novel, written in a style that is masterful despite perhaps owing a tad too much to Turgenev, will be astonished. Jabotinsky the politician was the scorched earth irredentist uber nationalist of the Zionist movement, the founder of right wing Zionism. The Jabotinsky who wrote this rueful paean to a lost cosmopolitan, assimilated, multinational secular city-state reminiscent of New York or London is pretty much the other Jabotinsky's philosophical and political opposite. How the two could exist in the same skin is beyond me, but I guess in Russian Jewish culture its possible. I can see why Jabotinsky's followers suppressed and censored it, and why it did not get translated into English until 2002.

    If you have any interest in Zionism and the mideast, this is a must read. If you have any interest in Russian literature, this is a must read. If you just like family sagas, also a must read.

  • A marvelous translation of a fascinating story written by a gifted writer.

  • This is an often poetic novel that gives an insight into the lives of upper middle class Jews at the turn of the century. I found it lacking in connective detail, with actually very little in the way of "Jewish Life". The author seems to have read Anna Karenina and much of the story line revolves around the social interaction of these folks in that sort of vacuous way in which Anna seems to operate. Oh yes, there are ethical and moral junctures mentioned, but they are usually excused by the characters involved or the author/narrator. There is a strange beauty to it that makes it readable. I frankly can't think of a modern audience that would be appropriate for this book, certainly not anyone looking for Jewish life at the turn of the century. Nor would a history lover be edified in the least little bit about what was happening in Odessa during that time period. So, if you have no other books to read and want to share some of the author's poetic descriptions, go for it.

  • I'm trying to finish this before I go to Odessa in 2 weeks. There are a lot of inside jokes and topical references, but the footnotes explain most of them.

  • This novel covers a fascinating subject and time period. The language is a bit stilted possibly because of the translation. The writing style is obtuse at times and the reader had difficulty connecting emotionally to the subject.

  • Prompt delivery, as promised.