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ePub Mister B. Gone download

by Doug Bradley,Clive Barker

ePub Mister B. Gone download
Author:
Doug Bradley,Clive Barker
ISBN13:
978-0061445583
ISBN:
0061445584
Language:
Publisher:
HarperAudio; Unabridged edition (October 30, 2007)
Category:
Subcategory:
Genre Fiction
ePub file:
1743 kb
Fb2 file:
1138 kb
Other formats:
rtf txt mbr lrf
Rating:
4.8
Votes:
909

by Clive Barker (Author), Doug Bradley (Narrator). I have been reading Clive Barker for just a short time in the grand scheme of things. I had The Books of Blood 1-6 and enjoyed those but I usually read Piers Anthony, but I have everything he has written

by Clive Barker (Author), Doug Bradley (Narrator). I had The Books of Blood 1-6 and enjoyed those but I usually read Piers Anthony, but I have everything he has written. So while I was waiting on a new book from him I had read some John Lundquist(Let Me In, Handling the Undead, ETC) and have liked his books, and thought Clive might be a good one to get into. I now have several books by Clive and so far all are good. This Book was especially good.

Doug Bradley does a great job with the narration but even he and his musical accent couldn’t save this lackluster story for m. .

For Emilian David Armstrong. With my love and thanks to Pamela Robinson. You’ll go mad. Become a living blank, all that you ever were wiped away, because you wouldn’t do one simple thing. Go on. Quickly, while there’s still time. Believe me, friend, you should set fire to this book right now, or you’ll regret the consequences. What are you waiting for? You don’t have a light?

Written by Clive Barker. Narrated by Doug Bradley. Lon Milo Duquette-The Weiser Book of Horror and the Occult: As writes in his introduction, horror takes its time.

Written by Clive Barker. Mister B. Gone marks the long-awaited return of Clive Barker, the great master of the macabre, to the classic horror story. This bone-chilling novel, in which a medieval devil speaks directly to the reader, claims to be a ed demonic memoir penned in the year 1438. The sole copy was, so the story goes, created by the inventor of the printing press, Johannes Gutenberg himself. It creeps in, seeps in, and lingers.

Clive Barker (born 5 October 1952) is an English playwright, novelist, film director, and visual artist. Barker came to prominence in the mid-1980s with a series of short stories, the Books of Blood, which established him as a leading horror writer. He has since written many novels and other works, and his fiction has been adapted into films, notably the Hellraiser and Candyman series. He was also the executive producer of the film Gods and Monsters.

Working for Clive Barker's book! Internal illustration. This episode, Jose and Ryan take a break from the book to catch up on Hellraiser, Candyman and Clive Barker convention news, as well as late-breaking news about the new Imaginer art books. Doug Bradley Barbie Wilde Nicholas Burman-Vince Simon Bamford Skinless Frank Clive Barker Podcast Clive Barker: Revelations Hellraiser Movie Official Danny Stewart . This episode, Jose and Ryan take a break from the book to catch up on Hellraiser, Candyman and Clive Barker convention news, as well as late-breaking news about the new Imaginer art books RE.

Wash quickly, Mister . he said. We have places to go and sights to see. Such as The End of the World? Quitoon surveyed the litter of innocents around my bath.

You can read book Mister B. Gone by Clive Barker in our library for absolutely free. Wash quickly, Mister . I said change, not end. Every change is an end, I said. Well, listen to you. The naked philosopher. Do you mock me, Mister . Do you care, Mister . Only if you mean to hurt me.

Go on. Quickly, while there's still time. It's not that difficult. Just stop reading and burn the book. It's for your own good, believe me. Burn it. Don't look at another word. No, I can't explain why. We don't have time for explanations. Every syllable that you let your eyes wander over gets you into more and more trouble. And when I say trouble, I mean things so terrifying your sanity won't hold once you see them, feel them. You'll go mad. Become a living blank, all that you ever were wiped away, because you wouldn't do one simple thing.

In a macabre "memoir" lost for six hundred years, Jakabok--or Mr. B.--a minion of hell, describes the dark events that had shaped his youth, his rise to "major" demon status, and his nefarious plans to bring darkness and despair to unwitting humans everywhere.
  • After finishing Clive Barker's Mister B. Gone, I have to say that it was rather amusing, and nowhere near as bad as people made it out to be. I can't remember any typos at all in the book.

    The passages where the narrator begs, bribes, or threatens the reader to burn the book were not as frequent or annoying as other people made them out to be. They did become a more frequent occurrence toward the end of the book; however, even then I did not feel they were overdone, though some people would clearly disagree. In any case, they did not interrupt the flow of the narrative for the most part, and while they did leave a few cliffhangers here and there, they were not just placed randomly in the worst possible place. The only time when this bothered me at all was when the book tried to describe what "I" was feeling or thinking while reading it; since it was completely off base with my reactions, it just didn't work for me at all.

    The ending scene, which describes how the character got trapped in the book in the first place also didn't work for me because it didn't mesh well with what happened before that scene and in general it seemed rushed and poorly thought out. Those who read the book might understand what I mean.

    Otherwise the book is an enjoyable read. As said before, I didn't find anything in it to be the least bit scary or amusing, but with the way the book was written, I don't think that was the intended reaction, since the book rarely seems to take itself seriously. What the book is, is an amusing and intriguing look at what it might be like to be a demon from hell and it documents the misadventures of that demon nicely. The writing is fluid and I found it easy to get into while still leaving plenty for the reader to ponder long after they put the book down.

    If you are new to Clive Barker, I would probably suggest not reading this book first, but instead start off with something along the lines of The Damnation Game, Hellbound Heart, or the Books of Blood. However, if you are a fan of Barker's work, then I would definitely recommend going into this with an open mind; this isn't his best work by any means, but I still enjoyed it nevertheless and hope others do as well.

  • I have been reading Clive Barker for just a short time in the grand scheme of things. I had The Books of Blood 1-6 and enjoyed those but I usually read Piers Anthony, but I have everything he has written. So while I was waiting on a new book from him I had read some John Lundquist(Let Me In, Handling the Undead, ETC) and have liked his books, and thought Clive might be a good one to get into. I now have several books by Clive and so far all are good. This Book was especially good. I really liked the Diary of a Demon thing, and it works well like this.

  • This book takes the perspective of a two-tailed demon who ends up on earth for awhile. I honestly don't understand why people hate it so much, other than the fact perhaps they don't get the story(or perhaps the humor, some would say Clive Barker is breaking the 4th wall). This was definately not Clive Barkers best but it was an innovative idea, and I do recommend reading it. So yes, it does say "burn this book" and you will learn why later in the book. All in all, I would say this is a good fiction book. Like any new idea, you will see a lot of dislike when things are changed up a bit, but all in all I would read this again. It isn't as bad as some say, but it won't take your breath away either.

  • One of my favorite childhood stories was called The Monster at the End of the Book, which featured Grover (of Sesame Street fame). When Grover realizes what the title of the book is, he actively tries to discourage the reader from getting to the end, as he doesn't want to meet any monster. If Clive Barker had written this story, it would probably turn out as Mister B. Gone has.

    The monster in every page of this book is Jakabok Botch, a demon who has now taken the form of a book. To the reader, he promises danger to body and soul if he or she actually reads the book; it would be far better to burn it immediately. For those who dare to continue, however, Jakabok will provide a memoir of his life and how he got in his present state.

    Jakabok starts out as an adolescent demon in the Ninth Circle of Hell. He is a lowly devil who is part of a lowly family, with a father who is abusive and a mother that is generally apathetic. One day, he is captured by some "fishermen": humans who know how to bring demons out of Hell and trap them on the Earth. Escaping his captors, Jakabok is soon wandering the land of medieval Europe with another demon as companion. The two participate in various malicious acts and are eventually drawn to the town of Mainz, where a man named Gutenberg is developing something that will be world-changing.

    This short book brings Barker back to his horror roots, but it seems more satire than horror. Jakabok, despite all his evil acts, never seems that threatening, which probably makes him easier to identify with. It is a decent novel that is maybe more clever than great, but it does have enough good moments to be worth the effort. It may not be the best introduction to Barker, but this atypical novel will satisfy most readers.

  • Book came in condition as stated and within estimated delivery date. Anything by Clive Barker is gonna be good and this book did not disappoint! I love the main character and how well the story is written. It was original and funny and dark and the fact that the character kept breaking the 3rd wall made it more interesting. Couldn't put it down!

  • Not perfection and not like the books Clive is best known for. This is a book with a different feel to it. Its Clive's more playful mind working to give you something simple, direct and yet with character complexity with a dash of the fantastic.

    People are bombing this book because they are either fans who don't like the departure from Clive's classics. Or they are people who have heard about Clive and reading this book and not getting what they expected.

    I paid $5 for a used copy but even $11 for a fresh one is worth the money. Its worth the read if you want something different.