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by Albert S. Hanser,William Dufris,Newt Gingrich

ePub The Battle of the Crater: A Novel download
Author:
Albert S. Hanser,William Dufris,Newt Gingrich
ISBN13:
978-1427213280
ISBN:
1427213283
Language:
Publisher:
Macmillan Audio; Unabridged edition (November 8, 2011)
Category:
Subcategory:
Genre Fiction
ePub file:
1860 kb
Fb2 file:
1333 kb
Other formats:
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Rating:
4.6
Votes:
912

With each boo. ingrich and Forstchen have gone from strength to strength as storytellers.

With each boo. -William Trotter, The Charlotte Observer. NEWT GINGRICH, front-running Republican primary candidate for the 2012 Presidential Election, former Speaker of the House, bestselling author of Gettysburg and Pearl Harbor, the longest serving teacher of the Joint War Fighting Course for Major Generals at Air University, and an honorary Distinguished Visiting Scholar and Professor at the National Defense University. He resides in Virginia with his wife, Callista, with whom he hosts and produces documentaries, including their latest, A City Upon A Hill.

All three of the books in what is now called The John Matherson Series achieved NYT best seller status. The Battle of the Crater: A Novel (2011) (with Newt Gingrich and Albert S. Hanser). George Washington series

The Battle of the Crater: A Novel (2011) (with Newt Gingrich and Albert S. George Washington series. With Newt Gingrich and Albert S. Hanser.

Also by Newt Gingrich and William R. Forstchen. The priest forced a good-natured smile as they passed the bottles around, draining the last of the contents and then throwing them out of the trench to shatter. Four minutes, me boys, four minutes. Father Hagan looked back at the colonel, who was visibly trembling, and sighed.

Authors: Forstchen, William . Gingrich, Newt, Hanser, Albert . Gingrich, Newt, Hanser, Albert S. Categories: Fiction llowed. He then glanced over the side of the roadway, filled with awe and, admittedly, nervousness as well. They were crossing the James River over the great pontoon bridge, which spanned nearly a mile in length. After the disaster at Cold Harbor, the Army of the Potomac had been stalled in front of Richmond for another week. Their movement, which had started in early May, was halted.

NEWT GINGRICH, former Speaker of the House, bestselling author of Gettysburg and Pearl Harbor, the longest serving teacher of. .He received his doctorate from Purdue University and is the author of more than forty books

NEWT GINGRICH, former Speaker of the House, bestselling author of Gettysburg and Pearl Harbor, the longest serving teacher of the Joint War Fighting Course for Major Generals at Air University, and an honorary Distinguished Visiting Scholar and Professor at the National Defense University. He resides in Virginia with his wife, Callista, with whom he hosts and produces documentaries, including "A City Upon A Hill". He received his doctorate from Purdue University and is the author of more than forty books. Forstchen's doctoral dissertation on the 28th USCT was one of the first in depth studies of a USCT regiment.

On July 20, we had the largest server crash in the last 2 years. Full recovery of all data can take up to 2 weeks! So we came to the decision at this time to double the download limits for all users until the problem is completely resolved. Thanks for your understanding! Progress: 9. % restored. Главная The Battle of the Crater: A Novel. The Battle of the Crater: A Novel

Newt Gingrich and William R. Forstchen, read by William Dufris.

Newt Gingrich and William R. Putative presidential hopeful, political lightning rod and prolific author Gingrich (

by Albert S. Hanser, Newt Gingrich, William R. Forstchen

by Albert S. With To Make Men Free (originally published as The Battle of the Crater ), New York Times bestselling authors Newt Gingrich and William R. Forstchen take readers to the center of a nearly forgotten Civil War confrontation, a battle that was filled with controversy and misinterpretation even before the attack began. June 1864: the Civil War is now into its fourth year of bloody conflict with no end in sight.

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. Praise for the works of Newt Gingrich and William R. Masterful storytelling. With To Make Men Free (originally published as The Battle of the Crater), New York Times bestselling authors Newt Gingrich and William R. -William E. Butterworth IV, New York Times bestselling author of The Saboteurs. Compelling narrative force and meticulous detail. -The Atlanta Journal Constitution.

Читает William Dufris. Мгновенный доступ к вашим любимым книгам без обязательной ежемесячной платы. General Ambrose Burnside, a hard luck commander out of favor with his superiors, is one of the few generals eager to bring a division of these new troops into his ranks. Слушайте книги через Интернет и в офлайн-режиме на устройствах Android, iOS, Chromecast, а также с помощью Google Ассистента. He has an ingenious plan to break Fort Pegram, the closest point on the Confederate line, defending Petersburg-the last defense of Richmond-by tunneling forward from the Union position beneath the fort to explode its defenses.

With The Battle of the Crater, New York Times bestselling authors Newt Gingrich and William R. Forstchen take readers to the center of a nearly forgotten Civil War confrontation, a battle that was filled with controversy and misinterpretation even before the attack began. Drawing on years of research, the authors weave a complex narrative interweaving the high aspirations of African American troops eager to prove themselves in battle and the anxiety of a President who knows the nation cannot bear another major defeat.

June 1864: the Civil War is now into its fourth year of bloody conflict with no end in sight. The armies of the North are stalled in fetid trenches outside of Richmond and Atlanta, and the reelection of Abraham Lincoln to a second term seems doomed to defeat--a defeat that will set off the call for an end to the conflict, dismembering the Union and continuing slavery.

Only one group of volunteers for the Union cause is still eager for battle. Nearly two hundred thousand men of color have swarmed the recruiting stations and are being mobilized into regiments known as the USCTs, the United States Colored Troops. General Ambrose Burnside, a hard luck commander out of favor with his superiors, is one of the few generals eager to bring a division of these new troops into his ranks. He has an ingenious plan to break Fort Pegram, the closest point on the Confederate line, defending Petersburg--the last defense of Richmond--by tunneling forward from the Union position beneath the fort to explode its defenses. Burnside needs the USCTs for one desperate rush that just might bring victory.

The risks are high. Will Burnside be allowed to proceed or will interference from on high doom his plan to failure? The battleground drama unfolds through the eyes of James Reilly--famed artist, correspondent, and friend of Lincoln, who has been employed by the president to be his eyes and ears amongst the men, sending back an honest account of the front. In so doing, he befriends Sergeant Major Garland White of the 28th USCT regiment, an escaped slave and minister preparing his comrades for a frontal assault that will either win the war, or result in their annihilation.

The Battle of the Crater is Gingrich and Forstchen's most compelling fact-based work yet, presenting little known truths, long forgotten in the files of correspondence, and the actual court of inquiry held after the attack. The novel draws a new and controversial conclusion while providing a sharp, rousing and harshly realistic view of politics and combat during the darkest year of the Civil War. This must-read work rewrites our understanding of one of the great battles of the war, and the all but forgotten role played by one of the largest formations of African American troops in our nation's history.

  • I'm rating this novel as a '3' based on two factors i.e. historical detail and literary quality. The historical detail and research seems reasonably good but the literary quality leaves a lot to be desired. In my critical opinion, the story of the Battle of the Crater should be an exciting page turner from the first to the last. This book is the exact opposite of that. There is abundant non-action material that amounts to mere filler. I skimmed over half of this book to get to the real action. I was also confused about some of the history. Do the telegrams still exist? If so, did Lincoln actually read them and, if he did, who presented them to him? How do we know about the real interactions between Burnside, Meade, Grant and division commanders? Do we have first hand information or detailed first person notes? If not, have the authors simply assumed a lot of things based on subsequent results?

    I thought the combat scenes could have been better constructed. Granted that the Crater was a particularly confused 'battle' but this should be a reason for the authors to unravel the action for the interested reader. The emphasis, instead, is politically correct. The emphasis is on advancing 'the cause' of the Colored 28th.

    Let's go to some of the actual facts of what happened. The tunnel and explosive destruction of Pegram's fort was, in fact, an excellent idea. Conducted even semi-competently the attack should have caused the collapse of Petersburg and likely Richmond, itself. From the get-go, however, the breakthrough was planned poorly and, despite the fact that the authors don't [refuse?] to discuss it, the problem is with 1860s 'political correctness'. Somebody [Burnside?] must have really, really wanted black troops [28th] to spearhead the breakthrough that would likely end the war. This was an incredible and demonstrably foolish decision. Given the fact that there were plenty of veterans available, it was stupid to rely on green, non-veteran troops to spearhead the attack. This has nothing to do with black and white but everything to do with combat experience.

    Granted the fact that these green troops were given specialized training to exploit the massive gap in the Confederate lines following the explosion, but such training could and should have been given to veteran troops. The authors imply that the white veterans were 'played out'--almost mutinous--but such is probably untrue. When told that they would be advancing through a gap devoid of Confederate defenses, many would have been eager to go. Still the decision was made to use more-or-less green troops. Why? Probably because of abolitionist instincts on the part of some members of the high command. It is possible that such a decision originated with Abraham Lincoln, himself.

    Still, at the very last minute, black troops were pulled out of the spearhead and white troops lacking in specialized training were thrust into the spearhead. The results were a militarily inexcusable disaster. Had the black troops been left in place would the results have been better? I don't know. The trauma of the explosion itself, even had troops been mentally prepared for its massive nature, was apparently nearly unsustainable. Training or not, it is likely that assault troops would have delayed their attack until masses of earth and equipment stopped falling from the sky and the air cleared up enough to see. Still the unaware Confederate troops experienced a far greater shock and were present in far fewer numbers than their Yankee enemies. Despite the fact that they were completely unprepared for the Federal 'dirty trick', they ended up slaughtering their would-be conquerors.

    Therefore the genuinely remarkable thing about this battle was the rapid Confederate reaction i.e. the quality of the Confederate troops. This is something the authors almost entirely glossed over. For the vast majority of Confederate troops along that portion of the line, the massive explosion was completely unexpected. Several hundred died instantly and many more must have been injured, shell shocked, ear drums blown out. Nevertheless they reorganized quickly and their fire, from either flank, is precisely what drove so many Yankee troops into the Crater. And let me add that no Confederate troops had any kind of 'specialized' training to deal with the trauma. There reaction seems to have been automatic.

    Was there murder in the Crater. Almost certainly. The authors lead us to believe that special hatred was directed at black troops which is certainly correct...BUT...we must remember that Civil War troops were largely naive about land mines, IEDS and similar treacherous devices. They would have been outraged that the Yankees--white and black--had detonated a mine under their feet.

  • I'm not sure why Newt thought he'd rewrite the work of a great literary historian, but if you are truly interested in well-researched Civil War fiction, read Slotkin's No Cover: The Battle of the Crater.

  • Walt Whitman wrote, "Future years will never know the seething hell and the black infernal background of countless minor scenes and interiors, (not the official surface courteousness of the Generals, not the few great battles) of the Secession war; and it is best they should not -- the real war will never get in the books."

    One hundred and fifty years have passed since the beginning of the American Civil War, and truer words have never been written. Many have tried in words to capture the experience of those who fought this nation's most tragic war. A few are more successful than others. Newt Gingrich and his co-author William R. Forstchen, are among those few.

    Their novel, "The Battle of the Crater" is set during the summer of 1864. The war in the eastern theater has settled into a stalemate with both armies entrenched and facing each other around Petersburg, Virginia. Lieutenant Colonel Henry Pleasants of the 48th Pennsylvania, a mining engineer in his former civilian life, proposed to hasten the end of the war by tunneling under the Confederate line and detonate a large explosive charge directly beneath the enemy's feet; leaving a hole in the line for the Union army to charge through.

    Given the go-ahead by Major General Ambrose Burnside, Pleasants supervised the construction of the mine, while the troops who were expected to exploit the break in the Confederate defenses. Two brigades of United States Colored Troops were chosen for the assault, one to go around to the left of the crater and the other to right.

    James O'Reilly, an Irish artist correspondent for Harper's Weekly is Gingrich and Forstchen's primary protagonist. But Harper's isn't his only employer. O'Reilly, a close friend of President Lincoln has been sent by him to provide an honest report from the battlefront and also on the performance of the Colored Troops.

    Under the guise of reporting for Harper's O'Reilly is in the trenches of the Union Army around Petersburg, and witnesses the digging of the mine and the meticulous training of the Colored troops. He is also privy to the bickering between Burnside and Major General George Meade, the commander of the Army of the Potomac.

    The day before the attack Meade, fearing political ramifications if the assault should fail, ordered Burnside not to use the Colored Troops. Brigadier General James Ledlie's 1st Division was selected for the job. The result was a catastrophe. Instead of attacking around the rim of the crater as the colored troops were trained to do, the white soldiers charged into the crater, trapping themselves, and providing an excellent opportunity for the Confederate forces gathering on the rim of the crater to fire down into the swirling blue vortex of Union soldiers.

    Burnside makes matters worse by sending the Colored Troops in and exposing them to dangerous cross fire. O'Reilly follows the Colored Troops into the battle and not only witnesses the battle from within as it degenerates into bloody and savage hand-to-hand combat, but becomes a participant in it as well.

    While listening to the audiobook of "The Battle of the Crater," I was reminded of the opening fifteen minutes of Anthony Minghella's film adaptation of Charles Frazier's novel "Cold Mountain." Though the film brings us closer to what it might have been like during the fighting in the crater, Walt Whitman may have been right. The real war may never get in the books, but Gingrich and Forstchen have done an admirable job trying.