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ePub ANIL'S GHOST. download

by Michael. Ondaatje

ePub ANIL'S GHOST. download
Author:
Michael. Ondaatje
ISBN13:
978-0330485920
ISBN:
033048592X
Language:
Publisher:
KNOPF.; First Edition edition (1999)
Category:
Subcategory:
Genre Fiction
ePub file:
1815 kb
Fb2 file:
1776 kb
Other formats:
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Rating:
4.5
Votes:
330

Anil's Ghost is the critically acclaimed fourth novel by Michael Ondaatje. It was first published in 2000 by McClelland and Stewart.

Anil's Ghost is the critically acclaimed fourth novel by Michael Ondaatje. Anil's Ghost follows the life of Anil Tissera, a native Sri Lankan who left to study in Britain and then the United States on a scholarship, during which time she has become a forensic pathologist. She returns to Sri Lanka in the midst of its merciless civil war as part of a human rights investigation by the United Nations.

Home Michael Ondaatje Anil's Ghost. Anil’s Ghost is a fictional work set during this political time and historical moment. And while there existed organizations similar to those in this story, and similar events took place, the characters and incidents in the novel are invented

Home Michael Ondaatje Anil's Ghost. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24. Contents. And while there existed organizations similar to those in this story, and similar events took place, the characters and incidents in the novel are invented. Today the war in Sri Lanka continues in a different form. Anil was to remember all this very well. He got up then, pocketed the book, and touched one of the other patients and disappeared with him. The man moved quickly to where he remembered the government official was, beside the aisle. He was a doctor. The nurse picked up the coat and took it away.

I would say if you’re already a fan of Ondaatje’s writing style, you will probably enjoy this book. The power of the minor characters and the emotive essence of the story is certainly enough to draw anyone in. However, this story honestly comes across as lacking a certain artfulness of craft because this kind of narrative technique is handled better elsewhere.

Читать онлайн Anil's Ghost.

Both the insurgents and the separatists had declared war on the government. Читать онлайн Anil's Ghost.

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Halfway into Michael Ondaatje’s new novel, Anil’s Ghost, there is a scene so quietly devastating that it alone makes the novel worth reading.

Author: Michael Ondaatje. Halfway into Michael Ondaatje’s new novel, Anil’s Ghost, there is a scene so quietly devastating that it alone makes the novel worth reading. It is the mid-1980s, and a civil war is raging on the tiny island nation of Sri Lanka. Each day, fresh corpses inundate emergency medical clinics-many of them so mutilated that they are unidentifiable and can only be classified as disappearances.

The time is our own time.

Anil had been an exceptional swimmer as a teenager, and the family never got over it; the talent was locked to her for life. As far as Sri Lankan families were concerned, if you were a well-known cricketer you could breeze into a career in business on the strength of your spin bowling or one famous inning at the Royal-Thomian match. Anil at sixteen had won the two-mile swim race that was held by the Mount Lavinia Hotel

  • Review by: Elise Hadden, Under the Heather Books (...)

    What I Liked

    Above all, Anil’s Ghost is absolutely fascinating. The forensic and archaeological elements are detailed enough to draw the reader into the majestic mystery of the story. Yet somehow it is not enough to bog readers down in an endless info dump. As I have spent some time studying the Sri Lankan civil war from other angles, the exposure to the intensity of living through this era of terror was powerful. A doctor disappears with no warning, never to be seen again. Rebels yank a man out of his car and nail his hands to the street for no apparent reason. Torn between three factions vying for power, trust is a thing of the past. The characters are beautiful and everlasting, fractured with tragedy, genius, and beauty alike to reflect the ruptured nature of their homeland.

    What I Didn’t Like

    As much as I loved the narrative of this story, I found the main character, Anil, to be rather flat. Ondaatje’s style of flipping back and forth between past and present and flopping between characters requires a great deal of patience. It feels as if the reader must reach the end to really get a feel for the major characters’ personalities and histories. Unfortunately, for Anil this just never seemed to happen. The information we get about her comes too late and seems faintly disingenuous. In addition, Ondaatje uses the same narrative voice and style no matter which perspective he’s writing from. Signs as to whose POV you are reading comes late enough that I often had to reread the section.

    My Recommendation

    I would say if you’re already a fan of Ondaatje’s writing style, you will probably enjoy this book. The power of the minor characters and the emotive essence of the story is certainly enough to draw anyone in. However, this story honestly comes across as lacking a certain artfulness of craft because this kind of narrative technique is handled better elsewhere. Think Salman Rushdie’s obsessive perspective shifts in Midnight’s Children as a contrast. Although I know other may disagree. So, for it’s historical significance and the tragic narratives of many of the characters, I say read it. Just prepare for the possibility of confusion. You’ll need a good dose of patience, as well!

  • We read this for my book club and I'm so glad we did.
    Although there were times you weren't sure why a character was being described, it soon became apparent as they were brought into the next chapter with the protagonists. Anil was such a complex and profound character that I wasn't fond of the chapters where she was missing, but I also see that the story needed to be told from several perspectives. I do wish it had ended with Anil though. I wanted to know what she would do and where she would go,
    This is a book that needs to be discussed. There's a lot going on and it's not always clear what or why things are happening.
    It would be a great novel for a college history class. Anybody studying Sri Lanka?

  • In most other hands, the subject of ANIL'S GHOST would be a mere political thriller. Forensic anthropologist Anil Tissera accepts a UN mission to investigate atrocities in Sri Lanka, the country she left fifteen years before to study in England and the US. Among daily reminders of terrorist activities on all sides, she stumbles on evidence that the government also may be implicated in spreading fear by murder. Will she be able to confirm her suspicions? Will she be allowed to leave the country alive?

    But Michael Ondaatje (who was also born in Sri Lanka) is a poet, and he uses this narrative mainly as the armature for a meditation on the many ways the past can haunt the present. Several time-frames are at work simultaneously. Anil herself is in the immediate aftermath of a breakup from a lover in America only weeks before; there is a mystery concerning a close female friend of several years back; and of course her return to Sri Lanka brings back memories of her own childhood. Teamed in her investigation with a Sri Lankan archaeologist, she discovers a number of skeletons buried in the same site; the one which arouses her suspicions is obviously a recent death, but the others are over 100 years old, part of the buried record of a cultural history going back for centuries. Together, they visit the archaeologist's former teacher, an old man living ascetically in the depths of the forest, whose vision of history compasses millennia, intuitively subjective rather than scientific. Months, years, centuries, millennia: the time-frames intertwine, creating a tissue of memories that enfold the novel, the characters, and the country as in a web.

    Yet the memories are set against an all-too-immediate present. The contrast is seen most clearly in the two principal male characters, Sarath Diyasena, the detached archaeologist, and his brother Gamini, who is an emergency room physician dealing with the casualties from gunfire, bombing, and torture. Hooked on speed, Gamini lives in the hospital, snatching catnaps in waiting-rooms, living only for what he can do from one minute to the next. He is not so different from a colleague who, when captured by a terrorist group, went on practising his healing skills among the rebels, apparently with no desire to return so long as he was of use. The hospital sections of this book are unusually stark and focused, even as compared to THE ENGLISH PATIENT, which also set Ondaatje's apparent fascination with medicine and nursing against a background of present war and the archaeological past.

    Above all, Ondaatje is a poet, and I cannot think of any of his novels (I have also read IN THE SKIN OF A LION and DIVISADERO) that show this so richly. Early on, describing the National Atlas of Sri Lanka, he revels in sheer poetry like the following: "The geological map reveals peat in the Muthurajawela swamp south of Negombo, coral along the coast from Ambalagoda to Dondra Head, pearl banks offshore in the Gulf of Mannar. Under the skin of the earth are even older settlements of mica, zircon, thorianite, pegmatite, arkose, topaz, terra rossa limestone, dolomite marble. Graphite near Paragoda, green marble at Katupita and Ginigalpelessa." And for his final chapter, Ondaatje leaves the original plot far behind, describing instead the restoration of a colossal statue of the Buddha by one of the last surviving practitioners of the Netra Mangala, the art of painting the eyes on a statue and thus bringing the dead stone to life. Pulling back from the carnage, yet not forgetting it, the author ascends with the painter to the head of the towering figure. "And now with human sight he was seeing all the fibres of natural history around him...". The drawing together of these fibres is nothing less than the author's song of love for his native land.

  • This novel concerns Sri Lanka (Ceylon) in the last half of the 20th Century. The fighting factions on the island have almost wiped out the populace for reasons unclear except to gain power. Three main characters in the story are highly trained physicians and anthropologists, natives of Sri Lanka, who are risking their lives under unimaginable conditions to care for the wounded and dying.

    One, Anil, is a forensic anthropologist who is hoping to attract international help by proving that ancient burial sites also contain the recently murdered. The fourth character is an artist whose life depends on his ability to paint the eyes on statues of the Buddah without looking directly at the work. The descriptions of the traditions, landscape, and the lost history are indelibly described by the author, who was born in Sri Lanka. But there is much more--the characters are fascinating, mysterious, and all struggling with clouded pasts.