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ePub One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich: A Novel download

by Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn

ePub One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich: A Novel download
Author:
Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn
ISBN13:
978-0374226435
ISBN:
0374226431
Language:
Publisher:
Farrar, Straus and Giroux; 1st edition (February 1, 1992)
Category:
Subcategory:
Genre Fiction
ePub file:
1844 kb
Fb2 file:
1766 kb
Other formats:
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Rating:
4.2
Votes:
142

One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich is a novel by Nobel Prize-winning Russian writer Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, first published in November 1962 in the Soviet literary magazine Novy Mir (New World).

One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich is a novel by Nobel Prize-winning Russian writer Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, first published in November 1962 in the Soviet literary magazine Novy Mir (New World). The story is set in a Soviet labor camp in the 1950s and describes a single day in the life of ordinary prisoner, Ivan Denisovich Shukhov.

Solzhenitsyn's book describes one day in that camp, one day no better and no worse than any of the other three thousand six hundred and fifty-two days of Ivan's sentence. Ivan's experience was no isolated miscarriage of justice; it was typical of the Stalinist system, under which the labor camps of Siberia were crowded with Russians whose "crime" may have been nothing greater than a careless remark about Stalin to a tattletale neighbor. There is hardly a Russian family today that managed to escape this tragic fate

The only English translation authorized by Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn.

The only English translation authorized by Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn. First published in the Soviet journal Novy Mir in 1962, One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich stands as a classic of contemporary literature. An unforgettable portrait of the entire world of Stalin's forced work camps, One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich is one of the most extraordinary literary documents to have emerged from the Soviet Union and confirms Solzhenitsyn's stature as "a literary genius whose talent matches that of Dosotevsky, Turgenev, Tolstoy"-Harrison Salisbury.

By Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn. The first work of literature to speak openly and honestly about the Gulag, the novel was published in 1962 in the literary journal Novy Mir, launching not only Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn’s brave and distinguished career, but also a brief Thaw. More than forty years after Khrushchev handpicked the novel to expose Stalin’s cult of personality, Solzhenitsyn’s story of one peasant’s day in a labor camp enlightens us about lives cornered again and again by history. Can a man who’s warm understand one who’s freezing? the narrator of One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich asks.

Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn burst on the literary scene in 1962 with his short novel "One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich"

Solzhenitsyn's first book, this economical, relentless novel is one of the most forceful artistic indictments of political oppression in the Stalin-era Soviet Union. The simply told story of a typical, grueling day of the titular character's life in a labor camp in Siberia, is a modern classic of Russian literature and quickly cemented Solzhenitsyn's international reputation upon publication in 1962. Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn burst on the literary scene in 1962 with his short novel "One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich". It depicted an ordinary day in the life of an ordinary inmate in one of the Siberian labor-camps of the Soviet Gulag.

The only English translation authorized by Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn First published in the Soviet journal Novy .

The only English translation authorized by Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn First published in the Soviet journal Novy Mir in 1962, One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich stands as a classic of contemporary literature. The story of labor-camp inmate Ivan Denisovich Shukhov, it graphically describes his struggle to maintain his dignity in the face of communist oppression.

One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich, Alexander Solzhenitsyn's classic novel, was published 50 years ago this month. A short, simply-told tale about a prisoner trying to survive the Gulag - the Soviet labour camp system - it is now regarded as one of the most significant books of the 20th Century. It was still dark, although a greenish light was brightening in the east. A thin, treacherous breeze was creeping in from the same direction. There is no worse moment than when you turn out for work parade in the morning

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Аудиокнига "One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich: A Novel", Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn. Слушайте книги через Интернет и в офлайн-режиме на устройствах Android, iOS, Chromecast, а также с помощью Google Ассистента. Скачайте Google Play Аудиокниги сегодня!

Solzhenitsyn’s first literary work-a treatment of his experiences in th. Set in the forced-labour camp in which the author was interned from 1950 to 1953, Ivan Denisovich describes a typical day in the life of an inmate

Solzhenitsyn’s first literary work-a treatment of his experiences in th. Set in the forced-labour camp in which the author was interned from 1950 to 1953, Ivan Denisovich describes a typical day in the life of an inmate. Despite its grim portrayal of an inhumane system, and its refusal to romanticize the prisoners, the work stands as an affirmation of individual integrity.

First published in the Soviet journal Novy Mir in 1962, One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich stands as a classic of contemporary literature. The story of labor-camp inmate Ivan Denisovich Shukhov, it graphically describes his struggle to maintain his dignity in the face of communist oppression. An unforgettable portrait of the entire world of Stalin's forced work camps, One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich is one of the most extraordinary literary documents to have emerged from the Soviet Union and confirms Solzhenitsyn's stature as "a literary genius whose talent matches that of Dosotevsky, Turgenev, Tolstoy"--Harrison Salisbury
  • Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn burst on the literary scene in 1962 with his short novel "One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich". It depicted an ordinary day in the life of an ordinary inmate in one of the Siberian labor-camps of the Soviet Gulag. Solzhenitsyn's next major novel was published in 1968 under the title "The First Circle". It was a depiction of life in a "sharashka", which stood at the other end of the spectrum of Gulag prisons. A "sharashka" was the slang name by which inmates referred to the research and development laboratories of the Soviet Gulag labor camp system. Scientists, engineers, and mathematicians sent to the Gulag were, if they were lucky, assigned to a sharashka to work on projects that might prove useful to Stalin in his quest for ironclad security and his war with capitalist imperialism. Compared to the Siberian labor-camp of Ivan Denisovich, a sharashka was cushy; to be sure, it too was part of the Gulag, and the Gulag was hell, but a sharashka was, in Dantean terms, "the first circle of hell".

    This 741-page novel covers four days (Dec. 24-27, 1949) in a sharashka in Moscow known as Marfino -- 300 prisoners and 50 guards. The novel begins with a Soviet diplomat making an anonymous phone call to the American embassy to alert it of Soviet espionage focused on the atomic bomb. The embassy's phones are bugged and the phone call is recorded, but the Soviet security service doesn't know who the caller was. So inmate engineers and scientists at the Marfino sharashka are assigned the task of identifying the traitor, as quickly as possible.

    In the novel, Solzhenitsyn adds considerable depth and detail to the portrayal of the life of zeks (Gulag inmates) furnished in "Ivan Denisovich". He also uses the book to deliver a scathing critique of the Soviet system -- its ideological absurdities, its bureaucratic infighting and inefficiencies, its dishonesty and hypocrisy, and its cruelty. To top it off, the novel contains a devastatingly mocking and chilling portrait of Josef Stalin (see Chapters 19-23). Solzhenitsyn realized that as originally written, the novel was far too critical of the Soviet Union for it to see the light of day (this was in the mid-60's), so he "self-censored" it, excising nine chapters altogether and revising, or softening, those details sure to be most offensive to Soviet sensibilities. That self-censored version was published in 1968 under the English title "The First Circle", but even as expurgated it was not deemed fit for publication within the Soviet Union (and, indeed, that expurgated version contributed to the decision to expel Solzhenitsyn from the Soviet Union in 1974).

    This is the original, unexpurgated novel, in a form that Solzhenitsyn continued to tweak and revise. It has been brilliantly translated by Harry T. Willetts, who worked closely with Solzhenitsyn. Distinguishing it from the truncated version is the initial word "in" in the title. IN THE FIRST CIRCLE is the best Russian novel from the twentieth century that I have so far encountered in my ongoing survey of Russian literature in translation. It is a masterpiece.

    Though nominally covering only four days in late 1949, the novel contains the back stories of dozens of characters, stretching back to the days of the Bolshevik Revolution. It is superbly plotted. Its characterizations of about two dozen zeks (and their wives) are sensitive and endearing. In addition to the penetrating critique of the Soviet system and the detailed portrayal of the Gulag, the novel also contains many perceptive observations about human beings in general. It is rich in historical detail. And, in the best tradition of Dostoevsky and Tolstoy, it is rich in its exploration of moral and philosophical matters.

    For the title to this review, I have appropriated lines relating to the diplomat who made the anonymous phone call to the American embassy that triggered the four days of the novel. Heretofore, he had conducted himself according to the law that "we are given only one life", and thus he married well, accumulated the nicest material objects available on his side of the Iron Curtain, and even travelled abroad. He is soon to be posted to New York as part of the Soviet Union's delegation to the United Nations. But he has a spiritual and moral crisis of sorts, as a result of which he becomes aware of another law -- "that we are given only one conscience, too." "A life laid down cannot be reclaimed, nor can a ruined conscience." That's just one of the moral/philosophical conundrums Solzhenitsyn explores in this great novel.

  • "August 1914" kicks off the epic "Red Wheel" as Solzhenitsyn tries to capture the coming of the Russian Revolution in a series of novels. Another man's book is on Solzhenitsyn's mind; how can a Russian novelist write an epic on war and not confront Tolstoy and "War and Peace"? Tolstoy even makes a brief appearance at the start of the book. Solzhenitsyn guides the reader through the disastrous Russian invasion of East Prussia in August 1914 and unveils a number of characters-some real and some imaginary. There are haunting portraits of General Samsanov and Tsar Nicholas II. There are also descriptions of the battle and Solzhenitsyn's background from World War Two help him a great deal; these are some of the greatest battle scenes I have ever read. He guides the reader through the staff headquarters and to the front lines. He also offers unforgettable characters drawn from all of Russian society: a well off family at home, young officers connecting with the men, radical students, gentle peasants serving as troops. While his narrative is excellent, Solzhenitsyn is not as strong when he attempts to mimic the "camera eye" used by John Dos Passos in the USA trilogy. Nor does he quite succeed when he lists a number of headlines from the newspapers or offers detailed history in small print. But these are minor flaws that do not take away from the grand epic.

    If you are reading the work in English, make sure you use the version translated by H.T. Willetts that was released in 1989 and FSG published the paperback in 2000. This is the translation included in the Kindle. This version, unlike the original, contains a scathing look at Lenin as well as a detailed description of the rise and death of Stolypin, the one Russian statesman who may have been able to lead Tsarist Russia through the chaos it would succumb to during the Great War.

    Be warned. This is an epic undertaking. The book is almost a 1,000 pages and I advise you keep notes on characters, events and places. This is not a book for everyone. But it is a great epic and, if not up to the level of "War and Peace", "August 1914" is still in the same ballpark. How many other recent novels can we make that claim about?

  • Outstanding novel. I had previously read the Glenny translation which contains the Soviet sanitized version. This translation, by Willetts, which includes material from Lenin in Zurich, shows what Solzhenitsyn would have written without the censorship. As others reviewers have mentioned this novel follows the initial battles between the Germans and Russian at the start of WWI. While a novel, Solzhenitsyn, in the manner of Tolstoy describing the battle of Borodino, strives for historical accuracy. Descriptions of military leadership machinations will be familiar to anyone who has worked with the US Federal bureaucracy or the military. While the book is fairly long, it moves quickly and while not a light read keeps your interest. I highly recommend this novel as it is among a few that described the descent of the Russian Empire into the failed experiment of Soviet Russia.