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by David Liss

ePub The Whiskey Rebels (Thorndike Press Large Print Basic Series) download
Author:
David Liss
ISBN13:
978-1410410450
ISBN:
1410410455
Language:
Publisher:
Thorndike Pr; Large Print edition (November 3, 2008)
Category:
Subcategory:
Genre Fiction
ePub file:
1419 kb
Fb2 file:
1325 kb
Other formats:
lit azw lit lrf
Rating:
4.5
Votes:
697

Owen took my mug, poured in some whiskey from an unstoppered bottle and hot water from a pitcher near the stove. Nothing but anatomy, natural philosophy, human mechanics. There are diagrams in books to explain

Owen took my mug, poured in some whiskey from an unstoppered bottle and hot water from a pitcher near the stove. He set it down before me with a considerable thud. There are diagrams in books to explain.

Series: Thorndike Press Large Print Basic Series. ISBN-10: 9781410466822. Hardcover: 634 pages. ISBN-13: 978-1410466822. Product Dimensions: . x 1 x . inches. Shipping Weight: . pounds (View shipping rates and policies).

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Читать онлайн The Whiskey Rebel. For Eleanor and Simon.

David Liss The Whiskey Rebel For Eleanor and Simon Ethan Saunders It was rainy and cold outside, miserable weather, and though I had not left my boardinghouse determined to die, things were now different. Читать онлайн The Whiskey Rebel.

The Whiskey Rebels (Hardcover). Published November 1st 2008 by Thorndike Press. Author(s): David Liss (Goodreads Author). The Whiskey Rebels (Audio CD). Published April 7th 2015 by Brilliance Audio.

To be sure, our difficulties were eased by the help of our new neighbors. Mr. Dalton developed a particular attachment to my husband that first night, and he proved to be a good friend. Dalton developed a particular attachment to my husband that first night, and he proved to be a good friend at his companion, Mr. Jericho Richmond, was generally praised as one of the great marksmen in the region, and in that period of adjustment we would have starved had it not been for their regular gifts of game

Thorndike Press publishes large print books - including the most bestsellers and bestselling authors - in fiction genres like romance, mystery, and western to nonfiction sub-genres such as biography, history, and lifestyle in an easy-to-read format.

Thorndike Press publishes large print books - including the most bestsellers and bestselling authors - in fiction genres like romance, mystery, and western to nonfiction sub-genres such as biography, history, and lifestyle in an easy-to-read format.

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Hired by his onetime fiancâee to find her missing husband, Ethan Saunders, a former spy for Washington during the Revolution, follows a trail that leads him to Alexander Hamilton and to rebellious whiskey-makers fiercely opposed to a tax on their products.
  • This is the 3rd book I've read by David Liss and I have one more in queue, so obviously I like his writing. The stories are well-researched historical mysteries with a financial/markets/politics aspect to them. I rate "The Coffee Trader" and "A Conspiracy of Paper" 5 stars. I would give this 5 stars but for Liss' dealing with historical figures and a slightly dark ending. I should point out that I rate tough, and this is far better than 95% of the books rated 5-star on Amazon. (Apparently those folks have either never read quality or can't recognize it!).
    Having researched well and due to his ability to write period conversation, Liss gives the reader a real feel for the life and times of the era. This is not merely a poor modern story dropped into an historical setting to sell better.
    The story is written in the first person by 2 different characters whose lives eventually intertwine. Therefore there are alternating chapters of one character then the other -- it is not done merely as an affectation, but adds to the story. I know that some reviewers are confused or put off by this, but it adds considerably to the mystery not unlike Michael Crichton.
    In case you haven't read the other reviews, this primarily involves a woman who moves from Philadelphia to the frontier (Pittsburg) and returns seeking revenge, and an ex-American-Revolutionary-War-spy who was betrayed and disgraced. They are both involved with Alexander Hamilton setting up America's first national bank.

  • I gave this to my dad, ( a real history buff) for Christmas, and he loved it. He said it was one of the best historical novels he'd read, even if the author did go on a bit long about the history of the financial industry. In his opinion the characters were lively and fun, the historical detail convincing, and the writing skilled. He now plans to read other books by this author.

  • This book is an engaging look at a lesser known period in American history, the time after the Constitution was ratified and the new nation was just being established. It is often thought that, like a romance, once the conflict is resolved, the couple lives happily ever after. But for the United States after the revolution, it was a chaotic time of seeking to lay the foundations of a republic. Many suffered in the chaos, and many were victimized by unscrupulous people. Such were the first settlers of western Pennsylvania, who were deceived into overpaying for worthless land and taken advantage of at every turn. The tale told in this book is based on real events and people. It spins a complicated web of intrigue that maintains suspense until the last chapter. One is not certain who are the "good guys" and indeed there may not be only one side that is in the right. I heartily recommend this book as a fascinating development of both plot and characters. One of the best books I've read in the last year.

  • A well crafted story of the very early American frontier and life, particularly poignant given the current popularity of the Broadway musical Hamilton. Hamilton is a pivotal influence here if kept mostly behind the scenes. As with any grand social change, some people win big and others loose big. This is a story of people on the loosing side of Hamilton's effort to craft an American financial foundation. The book is not about finances however but rather life, and in particular the life of two people who through very hard work manage to craft their American Dream only to see it unravel and crushed by Hamilton's program. That gets us a bit more than half way through. The rest is the story of one of those character's mission of revenge for what Hamilton did.

  • Being from Monongahela, Pennsylvania (Pittsburgh area) and knowing just a little of the history of the Whiskey Rebellion, I was drawn to this novel. The first part of the book was interesting although slow in parts. The author's depiction of early Pittsburgh were deplorable and disappointing if accurate. It was entertaining nonetheless. Life in the new frontier of south western PA was also interesting to read as this was were I grew up. There was also a parallel, unrelated story taking place in alternating chapters. I enjoyed the first part of the book, but the second half was soon trapped in economics. Ecomics of the early banks of the US and the trades associated and, unfortunately, with the author's economics of words. He could have tied these story lines together and wrapped this book up in 200 pages less. Still enjoyable, but cumbersome at times.

  • This is the 3rd book I've read by David Liss and I have one more in queue, so obviously I like his writing. The stories are well-researched historical mysteries with a financial/markets/politics aspect to them. I rate "The Coffee Trader" and "A Conspiracy of Paper" 5 stars. I would give this 5 stars but for Liss' dealing with historical figures and a slightly dark ending. I should point out that I rate tough, and this is far better than 95% of the books rated 5-star on Amazon. (Apparently those folks have either never read quality or can't recognize it!).
    Having researched well and due to his ability to write period conversation, Liss gives the reader a real feel for the life and times of the era. This is not merely a poor modern story dropped into an historical setting to sell better.
    The story is written in the first person by 2 different characters whose lives eventually intertwine. Therefore there are alternating chapters of one character then the other -- it is not done merely as an affectation, but adds to the story. I know that some reviewers are confused or put off by this, but it adds considerably to the mystery not unlike Michael Crichton.
    In case you haven't read the other reviews, this primarily involves a woman who moves from Philadelphia to the frontier (Pittsburg) and returns seeking revenge, and an ex-American-Revolutionary-War-spy who was betrayed and disgraced. They are both involved with Alexander Hamilton setting up America's first national bank.

  • I gave this to my dad, ( a real history buff) for Christmas, and he loved it. He said it was one of the best historical novels he'd read, even if the author did go on a bit long about the history of the financial industry. In his opinion the characters were lively and fun, the historical detail convincing, and the writing skilled. He now plans to read other books by this author.

  • This book is an engaging look at a lesser known period in American history, the time after the Constitution was ratified and the new nation was just being established. It is often thought that, like a romance, once the conflict is resolved, the couple lives happily ever after. But for the United States after the revolution, it was a chaotic time of seeking to lay the foundations of a republic. Many suffered in the chaos, and many were victimized by unscrupulous people. Such were the first settlers of western Pennsylvania, who were deceived into overpaying for worthless land and taken advantage of at every turn. The tale told in this book is based on real events and people. It spins a complicated web of intrigue that maintains suspense until the last chapter. One is not certain who are the "good guys" and indeed there may not be only one side that is in the right. I heartily recommend this book as a fascinating development of both plot and characters. One of the best books I've read in the last year.

  • A well crafted story of the very early American frontier and life, particularly poignant given the current popularity of the Broadway musical Hamilton. Hamilton is a pivotal influence here if kept mostly behind the scenes. As with any grand social change, some people win big and others loose big. This is a story of people on the loosing side of Hamilton's effort to craft an American financial foundation. The book is not about finances however but rather life, and in particular the life of two people who through very hard work manage to craft their American Dream only to see it unravel and crushed by Hamilton's program. That gets us a bit more than half way through. The rest is the story of one of those character's mission of revenge for what Hamilton did.

  • Being from Monongahela, Pennsylvania (Pittsburgh area) and knowing just a little of the history of the Whiskey Rebellion, I was drawn to this novel. The first part of the book was interesting although slow in parts. The author's depiction of early Pittsburgh were deplorable and disappointing if accurate. It was entertaining nonetheless. Life in the new frontier of south western PA was also interesting to read as this was were I grew up. There was also a parallel, unrelated story taking place in alternating chapters. I enjoyed the first part of the book, but the second half was soon trapped in economics. Ecomics of the early banks of the US and the trades associated and, unfortunately, with the author's economics of words. He could have tied these story lines together and wrapped this book up in 200 pages less. Still enjoyable, but cumbersome at times.