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ePub Majestrum: Tales of Henghis Hapthorn, Book One download

by Matthew Hughes

ePub Majestrum: Tales of Henghis Hapthorn, Book One download
Author:
Matthew Hughes
ISBN13:
978-1597800617
ISBN:
1597800619
Language:
Publisher:
Night Shade Books; First Edition edition (October 1, 2006)
Category:
Subcategory:
Genre Fiction
ePub file:
1694 kb
Fb2 file:
1160 kb
Other formats:
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Rating:
4.1
Votes:
569

First published by Nightshade Books in August 2007. Published as an ebook by Matthew Hughes, March 2013.

No part of this book may be reproduced in any form or by any electronic or mechanical means. First published by Nightshade Books in August 2007.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Majestrum: Tales of Henghis Hapthorn, Book One as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

A Henghis Hapthorn Novel  . Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read.

Book 1 of 4 in Tales of Henghis Hapthorn (4 Book Series). Until now, Hughes' erudite master detective, Hengis Hapthorn, has appeared only in a handful of tales recently collected in The Gist Hunter and Other Stories (2005). Renowned on Old Earth and throughout the Ten Thousand Worlds as the galaxy's foremost discriminator (. private eye), Hapthorn is the far future's answer to Sherlock Holmes.

Nine Tales of Henghis Hapthorn. ISBN: 978-881078-2-3. The success of the Hapthorn stories led to three novels, Majestrum, The Spiral Labyrinth, and Hespira, which carry on the tale of impending doom from the six-story arc that began with Mastermindless and continued on to The Gist Hunter. This collection contains those six, plus three other Hapthorn tales: Sweet Trap, which, though a self-contained story, is also the first two chapters of The Spiral Labyrinth; Fullbrim’s Finding, which takes place just after Hespira; and The Immersion, which is set before the story arc begins.

The scientific method and a well-calibrated mind have long served freelance discriminator Henghis Hapthorn, but the universe is shifting away from logic and reasen towards a new age of sympathetic association.

The scientific method and a well-calibrated mind have long served freelance discriminator Henghis Hapthorn, but the universe is shifting away from logic and reasen towards a new age of sympathetic association, better known as magic. This change is evidenced by the transformation of Hapthorns electronic integrator into a small fruit-eating creature and the splitting of Hapthorn's own personality into two distinct beings sharing one body.

Here are nine tales of Henghis Hapthorn, foremost freelance discriminator of Old Earth in the planet's penultimate age. Included are the six stories that ran in The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction (and were previously collected. Included are the six stories that ran in The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction (and were previously collected in The Gist Hunter and Other Stories), leading up to the events that began the first Hapthorn novel, Majestrum, plus three more.

Majestrum - Matthew Hughes. Majestrum, a Henghis Hapthorn novel. The integrator told me that, during the hours I slept, my alter ego had been poring over the books I had acquired from the house of Bristal Baxandall

Majestrum - Matthew Hughes. No part of this book may be reproduced in any form or by any electronic or mechanical means including information storage and retrieval systems, without permission in writing from the author. The integrator told me that, during the hours I slept, my alter ego had been poring over the books I had acquired from the house of Bristal Baxandall. Baxandall, a budding thaumaturge, had been attempting a spell of personal transformation, using an entity from an adjacent dimension that he had managed to trap and coerce to his purposes.

Sherlock Holmes meets Jack Vance's Dying Earth in Majestrum, the explosive new novel from Matthew Hughes, acclaimed author of Black Brillion, Fools Errant, and The Gist Hunter and Other Stories.

Sherlock Holmes meets Jack Vance’s Dying Earth in Majestrum, the explosive new novel from Matthew Hughes, acclaimed author of Black Brillion, Fools Errant, and The Gist Hunter and Other Stories

Tales of Henghis Hapthorn, Book One. Part of Tales of Henghis Hapthorn. Sherlock Holmes meets Jack Vance’s Dying Earth in Majestrum, the explosive new novel from Matthew Hughes, acclaimed author of Black Brillion, Fools Errant, and The Gist Hunter and Other Stories. The scientific method and a well-calibrated mind have long served freelance discriminator Henghis Hapthorn, allowing him to investigate and solve the problems of the wealthy and powerful aristocracy of Old Earth, and securing him a reputation for brilliance across The Spray and throughout the Ten Thousand Worlds.

Sherlock Holmes meets Jack Vance’s Dying Earth in Majestrum, the explosive new novel from Matthew Hughes, acclaimed author of Black Brillion, Fools Errant, and The Gist Hunter and Other Stories. The scientific method and a well-calibrated mind have long served freelance discriminator Henghis Hapthorn, allowing him to investigate and solve the problems of the wealthy and powerful aristocracy of Old Earth, and securing him a reputation for brilliance across The Spray and throughout the Ten Thousand Worlds. But the universe is shifting, cycling away from logic and reason and ushering in a new age of sympathetic association, better known as magic. This change is evidenced by the unexplained transformation of Henghis Hapthorn’s personal electronic integrator into a small fruit-eating creature. Odder still, Hapthorn’s personality has been cleaved into two distinct beings sharing one body: himself, familiar and appropriate to the rational old order; and the other, strange, intuitive, and obsessed with an arcane and untranslated tome, appropriate to the new. When Hapthorn is hired by Lord Afre to investigate the motives of his daughter’s new companion, a young man of indeterminate circumstances, he takes the job expecting it to allow him the opportunity to explore and understand his changing universe. Little does Henghis Hapthorn realize, but the path of discovery will lead to deeper questions, a mysterious assignment from the Archon himself, and the ancient and powerful secret name... Majestrum!
  • A very slow moving (at times!) novel of science-fantasy-mystery set in the very far future, just one aeon before Jack Vance's Dying earth stories that I nonetheless felt was very entertaining. The story managed to hold my attention, which lately is quite an achievement! The characters are fairly unique - not so much in what they are but in how they are executed and how they are developed throughout the novel. Henghis Hapthorn himself sort of reminded me of a Sherlock Holmes of the future; that is if Watson was not a seperate individual but a split personality of Holmes's. Frequent references are made to stories in 9 Tales of Hengis Hapthorn but reading that collection should not be necessary to understanding and enjoying this novel. While the authors command of the language and inventiveness reminded me of Jack Vance it also reminded me of another favorite author, Clark Ashton Smith. However this is nothing like a Smith novel and is all about being a tribute to Vance and his Dying Earth.

  • Majestrum is the first in a trilogy of books concerning the exploits of one Henghis Hapthorn, a private detective of Old Earth. If you are new to Hughes, this is as good a place as any to start, and in fact, I would recommend that you start either with this one or with his Black Brillion, another good entree to this world.

    Matt's writing is rich, descriptive, his dialogue ironic and mannered. The setting is one of multiple facets, with the world of Old Earth presented as a place of exotic mystery, with the book's focus on the city of Olkney and the activities of its diverse citizens.

    I hate to always fall back on the old Jack Vance comparison because Matt's work, while inspired by Vance, is wholly his own. His characters are more prone to self-examination and there are no super-capable characters like in Vance's work. Matt's characters have many flaws and this only makes them more interesting to read about. Regarding Vance, I will say that if you enjoy the work of one, you will enjoy the work of the other. I cannot recommend this book, and all of Matthew's work, strongly enough. I have enjoyed his stuff since 2005 when I made his acquaintance on the Jack Vance MB and look forward to much more of it in the future. Now get reading!

  • Another good Night Shade publication. I am reaching the point where I just buy their list without discrimination, everything I have actually read has been very good.

    This detective/adventure tale (did I miss a previous one?) takes place in a science-fiction setting (advanced tech, etc) but functionally operates almost as a fantasy - technology is an unelaborated means to an end, fast interstellar travel, etc. This does allow the author to tell a story unencumbered by the need to explain why anything can be done technologically, and it works very well here.

    We follow the adventure of a detective/effectuator, initially on an investigation of apparently little import, but then summoned to assist the ruler of Old Earth (the planet amazon readers use now) on a matter of critical importance. This mystery is enhanced by giving the protagonist schizophrenia, as his magically-aspected persona has manifested as a separate entity and is waxing in his own slow rise to dominance over the currently rationality-based persona and world. A few questions do see unanswered at the end of the story, at least as I caught it.

    The read familiar with Jack Vance may find echoes of much of his work from the 60s and 70's in this effectuator's tale, and the unsuspecting might be persuaded that this is an unpublished title by the same author. (the resemblance was so strong that at times I thought I saw specific indirect references to vancisms, including the Connactic's (of the Alastor trilogy) habit of going out anonymously amongst his people when the Archon got a knot on the head. Am I wrong? Comment!)

    Edit - I have read an interview with the author, and he comes right out and says this is set one eon before the Dying Earth and that " I write the kind of story I like to read, and what I like to read is a Jack Vance story."

    He does a great job of it.

  • I've read a hundreds of scifi novels and hundreds of mysteries and never have I seen an author so cleverly combine the genres. The writing is superb. He deftly tackles a complex plot filled with mystery and magic and brings it all to a satisfying conclusion. Henghis Hapthorn has become, at least for the time being, my favorite character in all of fiction. Supremely capable and quite vain, yet insecure and fearful of a future he has no power over. As soon as I'm done writing this review I plan to start reading the next novel in this trilogy. Buy these books now and enjoy!

  • The author is often compared with Jack Vance. I feel the apprentice to Vance here surpasses the master. The reader needs to know that they most invest a bit of intellectual effort to get the most out of this series. The reader also needs to know that the effort will be rewarded with a batch of pleasant memories of the galaxy of Henghis Hapthorn.

  • Matthew Hughes is a real artist, with an old-fashioned devotion to the craft of writing. This is not science fiction, nor is it "realistic" in the way that people seem to expect of all fiction nowadays. The sentences are crafted, not just thrown on the page like a transcription of an overheard conversation at Starbuck's. It's like Trollope or Smollett...full of wit and clever language. But it's also exciting and thoroughly enjoyable. The only comparable living writer of "speculative fiction" I can think of is Jack Vance, and he's quit writing at age 93. So we are fortunate indeed to have Matthew Hughes, whose unique voice is a thoroughgoing delight. Highly recommended.

  • A great protagonist & even better companion, Matthew Hughes has created very memorable and sympathetic characters in a Jack Vance-ian alternative future setting. As always, his plots, dialogues, & writing in general are exceptionally readable, my only complaint might be that his books are over too soon.