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ePub The Dark: New Ghost Stories download

by Ellen Datlow

ePub The Dark: New Ghost Stories download
Author:
Ellen Datlow
ISBN13:
978-0765304445
ISBN:
0765304449
Language:
Publisher:
Tor Books; 1 edition (October 24, 2003)
Category:
Subcategory:
Genre Fiction
ePub file:
1942 kb
Fb2 file:
1725 kb
Other formats:
lrf rtf mbr txt
Rating:
4.7
Votes:
136

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Автор: Datlow Ellen Название: The Dark: New Ghost Stories Издательство: Holtzbrink(MPS)/MPS . 2004 Язык: ENG Размер: 2. 2 x 1. 0 x . 9 cm Поставляется из: США.

The Dark: New Ghost Stories. The Del Rey Book of Science Fiction and Fantasy. The Faery Reeclass "underline" Tales from the Twilight Realm. The Green Man: Tales of the Mythic Forest (with Terri Windling). All inquiries should be addressed to Night Shade Books, 307 West 36th Street, 11th Floor, New York, NY 10018.

These are not friendly ghost stories

These are not friendly ghost stories. Now she has brought together an array of all-new, original ghost stories for the shivering delight of readers who are ready to be frightened. And that's no idle threat. These are not friendly ghost stories.

Ellen Datlow These are not friendly ghost stories.

Ghosts are among us. On the other side of death, the spirits of departed souls have been part of human myths and beliefs as long as anyone can recall.

Электронная книга "The Dark: New Ghost Stories", Ellen Datlow

Электронная книга "The Dark: New Ghost Stories", Ellen Datlow. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "The Dark: New Ghost Stories" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

No two stories are alike; all are calculated to make it hard to be alone with the lights out.

Most ghost story anthologies have stories about ghosts. This book does do that, but the authors all have different definitions about what a ghost story should be. Winner of the International Horror Guild Award. Published by Thriftbooks. com User, 13 years ago. The Dark: New Ghost Stories, won the 2003 International Horror Guild Award for Best Anthology, and the story "Dancing Men" by Glen Hirshberg, won the award for Best Mid-Length Fiction. Good outweigh the not-so-good. The Faery Reel: Tales from the Twilight Realm.

Ghosts are among us. On the other side of death, the spirits of departed souls have been part of human myths and beliefs as long as anyone can recall. Some of the most powerful and affecting images in fiction are of ghosts, spirits, visitations from beyond the veil of death.Ellen Datlow, an editor whose stellar career has garnered her World Fantasy Awards, a Stoker Award, and a Hugo Award, has long been fascinated by ghosts. Now she has brought together an array of all-new, original ghost stories for the shivering delight of readers who are ready to be frightened.And that's no idle threat. These are not friendly ghost stories. This book is called The Dark because the editor asked her favorite authors specifically for stories that would provoke fear or disquietude, tales that would cause shivers down the spine and make readers want to keep a light on when they retire to bed for the night. The authors who answered her call compose an all-star cast of brilliant storytellers, including such award-winning, certifiably masterful authors as Ramsey Campbell, Jeffrey Ford, Charles L. Grant, Glen Hirshberg, Kathe Koja, Tanith Lee, Kelly Link, Sharyn McCrumb, Joyce Carol Oates, Lucius Shepard, and Gahan Wilson. Frighteningly good writers. Each has penned a unique tale unlike any of the others. All have cast dark spells that are sure to inspire fear or unease in the hardiest of readers.
  • Quite a few of the authors in this anthology cite Shirley Jackson as their favourite horror author. I'm sorry to say that very few of them appear to have gleaned much from reading Ms. Jackson: the majority of these stories are clumsy, pretentious and replete with the kind of dumb action/shocks she never resorted to.

    There are a couple of good stories here - Terry Dowling's 'One Thing About the Night' and Ramsey Campbell's 'Feeling Remains' are both very effective. But otherwise, this is a disappointing collection of minor ramblings from some good writers.

  • I so badly wanted to give this book five stars. I can only offer my apologies to the many Datlow fans out there. And I'm one of them.
    I've read all six of the fairly tale/fantasy anthologies that Ellen Datlow created with Terry Windling. Of those, I would give five stars to five out of the six volumes. They were all that good. Perhaps I simply have expecations carried over from those books which simply don't apply here. In those books the stories tended to have a point or a moral. That's the nature of many fairy tales. Obviously, this is much less so with ghost stories.
    The problem I have with "The Dark" is not only that many of the stories didn't seem to have a point to make, it's that the book misrepresents itself on the cover. The image you see is of a cloudy night with bats flying eerily through the sky. It denotes gothic, damp and foggy stories about being lost in the woods, visiting an eastern European country, or a ghost story from a hundred years ago. To give Datlow credit, she explains in her introduction that these are "new" ghost stories that sometimes tell about spirits appearing in mid-day to demand their revenge. But she also states that she hopes the stories will keep readers awake at night.
    And that, essentially, is what the problem is. Some of these stories are excellent literary character studies. For example, "The Trentino Kid," the first story in the book, is a good look at a clam digger having to confront the lack of direction in his life. It's a very good read. But it is not that scary. There are other stories that follow the same pattern - such as "The Silence of the Falling Stars" about a park ranger in Death Valley.
    Then there the stories that just shouldn't be in the book at all. I have no idea why "The Dead Ghost" is even in this anthology. It comes off as an exercise from a college writing course. It's not that the writing is bad - it's not - it's that it's a single scene with no emotional build-up.
    If you're looking for just good stories with an element of supernaturual, buy this book. If you're looking for something that keeps you awake at night, look elsewhere.

  • I always enjoy a good scare, and was happy to come across this anthology of "new" ghost stories. These are not your typical chain rattling, spook filled, gorey tales. For the most part these stories focus on the subtle line between the living and the dead, playing on our fears of the unknown, and leaving the reader with an overall feeling of disquiet rather than downright fear. These stories will have you pondering the possibilities rather than jumping at noises in the night. My personal favorites were "The Trentino Kid", "Doctor Hood", and the very unnerving "An Amicable Divorce" If you can appreciate a "thinking" reader's ghost story, these are the tales for you.

  • This was a good book of ghost stories. As the blurb on the back says, no two are alike. They take the reader in different directions. I like this anthology because it shows how versatile the the ghost story is. And what defines a ghost is in the eye of the beholder, and the storyteller. None of these stories would keep me up at night, but there is a lingering unease as I remember reading some of them. Various settings are used, and the imagination of the writers seems limitless to me. Read these stories if you want a fresh, different look at ghosts. I definitely think this volume has ghost stories for the millenium.

  • This anthology is really interesting in many ways. There are so many perspectives and styles of writing (but then again, it IS an anthology). Each story has its own shine, and of course they make the hairs on your back stand up. I suggest reading this book at night just for the full scary effect. Honestly, I couldn't sleep some nights after reading a particular story.

    The plots of each story are all different in good ways. Some get right to the nitty-gritty while the others take some time to explain the setting and reasons for the paranormal phenomenas. A reader will most likely find a personal favorite among the batch of short stories.

    These stories are meant to stay with the reader forever. I believe it is the kind of material that is transformed into urban legends and will hopefully last a long time.

    It is really fascinating how Datlow compliled these ghost stories. At first sight, the book's cover doesn't seem too intimidating, but a few minutes into the book, and you're bound to be hooked.

  • I'm usually very skeptical whenever I purchase a collection of horror stories; most of them are poorly edited, consisting of stories that are not scary or engaging at all, marked more by pretension and arrogance rather than literary quality or actual chills.

    This book, however, is remarkably effective and well done. The stories are uniformly well written, and the presence of true masters of the field, such as Joyce Carol Oates and Ramsey Campbell really lends an air of authority and intelligence to this collection.

    I'm very glad I purchased this collection, and I recommend it highly.

  • Datlow again proves she's one of the top editors in the horror field, collecting sixteen memorable ghost stories together in a single volume, proving that there's plenty of life left in this subgenre. Standouts include Jeffrey Ford's "The Trentino Kid," Glenn Hirshberg's "Dancing Men," and Lucius Shepard's "Limbo," which alone justifies the purchase of this outstanding anthology.