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ePub Moby-Dick (Barnes Noble Classics Series) download

by Carl F. Hovde,Herman Melville

ePub Moby-Dick (Barnes  Noble Classics Series) download
Author:
Carl F. Hovde,Herman Melville
ISBN13:
978-1593080181
ISBN:
1593080182
Language:
Publisher:
Barnes & Noble Classics; (10th) edition (April 1, 2003)
Category:
Subcategory:
Genre Fiction
ePub file:
1978 kb
Fb2 file:
1511 kb
Other formats:
lrf mobi mbr rtf
Rating:
4.4
Votes:
307

Moby-Dick (Barnes & Noble. has been added to your Cart. From Carl F. Hovde's Introduction to Moby-Dick. It is clear that Melville is not Ahab, nor is he Ishmael, though here the relationship is more complicated.

Moby-Dick (Barnes & Noble. Call me Ishmael," chapter I begins: The borrowed name lets us know that he will tell us only what he wants to, and that he is a man apart from his fellows.

Moby-Dick was first published in 1851. Dictionary of Sea Terms is adapted from Richard Henry Dana’s The Seaman’s Friend, originally published in 1845.

Barnes and Noble Classics. товар 2 Moby Dick by Herman Melville (Paperback, 2003) Barnes & Noble Classics -Moby Dick by Herman Melville (Paperback, 2003) Barnes & Noble Classics. 371,06 RUB. Бесплатная доставка. товар 3 Moby-Dick (Barnes & Noble Classics Series) Melville, Herman Paperback Used - Ve -Moby-Dick (Barnes & Noble Classics Series) Melville, Herman Paperback Used - Ve. 354,33 RUB. + 619,46 RUB за доставку.

Here are some of the remarkable features of Barnes & Noble Classics: New introductions commissioned from today''s top writers and scholars. Biographies of the authors.

Steering north-eastward from the Crozetts, we fell in with vast meadows of brit, the minute, yellow substance, upon which the Right Whale largely feeds.

Steering north-eastward from the Crozetts, we fell in with vast meadows of brit, the minute, yellow substance, upon which the Right Whale largely feeds nd us, so that we seemed to be sailing through boundless fields of ripe and golden wheat

Here are some of the remarkable features of Barnes & Noble Classics: New introductions commissioned from today's top writers and scholars.

Here are some of the remarkable features of Barnes & Noble Classics: New introductions commissioned from today's top writers and scholars.

Herman Melville’s classic masterpiece tells the story of the wandering sailor .

Herman Melville’s classic masterpiece tells the story of the wandering sailor Ishmael and his voyage on the whaleship Pequod, commanded by Captain Ahab. Moby dick or the whale. Its extreme downtown is the battery, where that noble mole is washed by waves, and cooled by breezes, which a few hours previous were out of sight of land. Look at the crowds of water-gazers there.

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Barnes & Noble Leatherbound Classics. A list of the beautiful leather-bound classics released by the Barnes & Noble bookstore chain.

Melville's classic novel has given American literature some of its most iconic characters

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  • I read Moby-Dick several times in college almost forty years ago. Now I'm taking a night class and reading it with life experience of forty years. Awe is the feeling that constantly gets evoked as I read. Why awe?

    Capacious. That is the word that repeats again and again in my head. Moby-Dick is a vibrantly colored hot air balloon that keeps growing in size as I read it. First, Melville's subject is the sperm whale, the largest creature on earth. But we don't just learn about the sperm whale but about all whales. Then we learn about whaling and its nobility. Here is where it gets very interesting. We participate in whaling, its skill, equipment, courage, risks and economy AND about how it results in the gruesome destruction of the whale. We feel the horror inflicted on the whales and we feel the nobility of the activity that slaughters them. Melville doesn't allow us to avert our eyes either to the daring of whaling or to the viciousness of the slaughter. That is where the book inflates even more because he holds both perspectives equally which is a much larger place than if he had taken sides.

    The book also foreshadows modernism by using a variety of narrative techniques; theater, pure narration, encyclopedic explanations and subjective interior monologues. Melville is constantly breaking up the narrative with omniscient recitations of fascinating information about his subject matter. And like Ulysses or the Waste Land, he piles on the reference to Shakespeare, the Greeks, Christianity and the Hebrew traditions.

    There are many references with regard to Ahab and the Whale regarding evil and Satan. Yet Ahab has great respect and reverence for Moby Dick. Ahab himself knows he is obsessed and but can have great compassion like his feelings for the lowly addled Pip. So yes there is evil afoot in the book but it isn't the kind that that creates simple polar opposites. As Ahab describes Moby-Dick (has) `an inscrutable malice sinewing through it' that describe the book as well. There is evil and there is also goodness that coexists in the book making the reader feel that he has to take sides. If the reader resists this temptation he or she will experience the awe of a deep and ever expanding mystery.

  • This review is for the Norton Critical 150th Anniversary Edition. I've read several other versions, as this is one of my favorite books, and this edition would easily be in my Top editions to own. Despite being a paperback and filled with supplemental material, I was surprised at how compact it is. The annotations and illustrations really add to your reading enjoyment of this classic novel.

  • A very enjoyable listen. Well narrated and takes a long time to get through, my two main requirements for an audiobook :). I tried reading this when I was young (luckily never given it as an assignment) and it is a tough read. Herman Melville was a master of the poetic phrase and it is beautiful to listen to but a trudge to read imho. A true American classic of the dangers of revenge and mob mentality. It also provides a time-machine like glimpse into the powerful American whaling industry and once again demonstrates the American concept (for good or bad) that whatever the world does we will outstrip it. I was especially pleased with the authors (narrators) view on the belief that mankind could never kill enough whales to endanger their numbers in the ocean and provides an interesting analogy separating their killing from the American Buffalo. Sadly, little did he know of where technology and seafaring were headed just a few decade later. I spent .99 for the kindle book and got the audio for free so I count it as money well spent.

  • Nathaniel Philbrick is a brilliant writer. His prose is flowing and clear, and he has chosen his excerpts from this towering work well. His enthusiasm for MOBY DICK is infectious and he has managed to overcome my hesitation about jumping into a long work of nineteenth century fiction. I have started reading MOBY DICK, and I will persevere!

    So why four stars and not five? The final chapter of this wonderful book seemed vague and the concluding paragraphs felt like a contradiction to every valid point in the previous pages. It is almost as though the editor said to Philbrick: "Geez, you can't end the book on such a dark note. Put in a rainbow, or something." Melville was a complex, needy and troubled person, as this book recognizes. He was probably bipolar (although the word is never mentioned), and certainly had a strong streak of depression in his personality and life experiences. That Melville somehow clung to youthful dreams through the end of his life is just a little too improbable. That a scrap of paper found by Melville's family after his death is the evidence of such hope is very weak evidence indeed. That he managed to live out his life in obscurity after failing to achieve family harmony, financial success or artistic recognition does not suggest hope as much as resignation. Philbrick is certainly entitled to this opinion, although for me, as a reader of this tiny gem of a book, it seemed a falsified conclusion, unworthy of all of the sensitive and almost poetic content in the rest of the book.