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ePub The Waves download

by Virginia Woolf

ePub The Waves download
Author:
Virginia Woolf
ISBN13:
978-0156949606
ISBN:
0156949601
Language:
Publisher:
Harvest Books (1978)
Category:
Subcategory:
Genre Fiction
ePub file:
1177 kb
Fb2 file:
1248 kb
Other formats:
doc mobi rtf lit
Rating:
4.8
Votes:
220

Home Virginia Woolf The Waves. The waves close over us, die beech leaves meet above our heads. There is the stable clock widi its gilt hands shining.

Home Virginia Woolf The Waves. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21. The Waves. The sun had not yet risen. Those are the flats and heights of die roofs of the great house.

The Waves, Virginia Woolf The Waves is a 1931 novel by Virginia Woolf. It is considered her most experimental work, and consists of soliloquies spoken by the book's six characters: Bernard, Susan, Rhoda, Neville, Jinny, and Louis. Also important is Percival, the seventh character, though readers never hear him speak in his own voice.

The Waves is a 1931 novel by Virginia Woolf. It is considered by many to be her most experimental work, and consists of soliloquies spoken by the book's six characters: Bernard, Susan, Rhoda, Neville, Jinny, and Louis. The soliloquies that span the characters' lives are broken up by nine brief third-person interludes detailing a coastal scene at varying stages in a day from sunrise to sunset.

Adeline) Virginia Woolf (née Stephen; 25 January 1882 – 28 March 1941) was an English novelist and essayist, regarded as one of the foremost modernist literary figures of the twentieth century. During the interwar period, Woolf was a significant figure in London literary society and a member of the Bloomsbury Group

Virginia Woolf is undoubtedly one of the most famous female writers of all time. The Waves, Virginia Woolf Courtesy of Oxford World's Classics. Between the Acts (1941).

Virginia Woolf is undoubtedly one of the most famous female writers of all time. A modernist, her books and essays are characterised by the movement’s stream of consciousness style, interior perspectives and abandonment of a linear narrative. A thoroughly talented writer, Woolf was a groundbreaker in her field and her books are a must for those who want to explore 20th-century literature. This book is an example of a stream of consciousness narrative, as the reader gets thrown into Clarissa’s mind and her world, creating a sense of intimacy with this character. It was made into a film in 1997.

The waves close over us, the beech leaves meet above our heads. Now Miss Hudson,' said Rhoda, 'has shut the book. Now the terror is beginning.

The sun had not yet risen. The waves close over us, the beech leaves meet above our heads. There is the stable clock with its gilt hands shining. Those are the flats and heights of the roofs of the great house. Now taking her lump of chalk she draws figures, six, seven, eight, and then a cross and then a line on the blackboard.

Virginia Woolf’s The Waves, published on October 8, 1931, is considered one of her most experimental novels. The book is one of Virginia’s later novels and was written around the same time as A Room of One’s Own. Instead of a plot-driven story, the ess novel is told in a series of soliloquies by its many characters. The story follows six characters from childhood to old age, focusing on their inner thoughts and feelings along the way.

Description: One of Woolf's most experimental novels, The Waves presents six characters in monologue - from morning .

Description: One of Woolf's most experimental novels, The Waves presents six characters in monologue - from morning until night, from childhood into old age - against a background of the sea. The result is a glorious chorus of voices that exists not to remark on the passing of events but to celebrate the connection between its various individual parts. The Years by Virginia Woolf - Hogarth Press The Years follows the lives of the Pargiters, a large middle-class London family, from 1880 to a summer evening in the 1930s. We see them each endure and remember heart-break, loss, radical change and stifling conformity, marriage and regret.

One of Woolfâ?™s most experimental novels, The Waves presents six characters in monologue - from morning until night, from childhood into old age - against a background of the sea. The result is a glorious chorus of voices that exists not to remark on the passing of events but to celebrate the connection between its various individual parts.
  • The Waves is a 20th century prose poetic study in childhood relationships. The children are like the author very intelligent and insightful and what a reader takes away is the poetic musical language of remembrances and psychological discoveries of recall from youth and the compounded effect of later life. If you like the language of youth and the discoveries of heartfelt sentiment this may be appealing to you. If you're looking for standard prose storytelling this will not be an easy read. Sample the text and at least try engaging Woolf's extraordinary mind as she unveils the remembrances of the wave-like encounters of current and past friends from childhood. A relatively short work makes the reading of this experimental novel even more approachable for someone new to psychologically complex studies of time recollected from youth.

  • The Waves is Virginia Woolf's masterpiece. It reads easily but the many metaphors and the fact that you are dealing with stream of consciousness makes you often pause to review and to see who is "speaking". It is poetic and the writing is beyond fine.

  • I have been a devoted fan of Virginia Woolf since I was a teenager and first discovered the brilliance of her writing in "To The Lighthouse"... after which I devoured everything she had written, including her diaries and essays. There is nothing else like The Waves in the whole of English literature, before or since. The best summary of it I have ever heard was the author Jeanette Winterson's comment that it represented "a 200-page insult to mediocrity". Indeed it does.

    Six characters, followed from childhood to old age, narrating what they see, think and feel, always in the present tense. As with her other novels, Woolf's insights into the individual's inner realm of emotion and thought are keen and complex. But the true magic of the book lies in the writing and the way all this is expressed. The language is uniquely lyrical; Woolf's words almost paint pictures on the page.

    This is not to say that The Waves is for everyone. So try this simple test: pick it off the shelf in a bookstore and read the first dozen or so pages. You will likely have one of two reactions: either that it is extraordinary, magical prose poetry, or a less prosaic "Huh?" If you're in the latter category, don't read the rest... and if you're still curious about Woolf, start with To The Lighthouse or Mrs Dalloway, both of which are more conventional in their form (though Woolf's work can rarely be termed conventional).

    I return to this book every few years as I myself advance in age and can relate more directly to a different part of the characters' lives. The old dinner party question about which three or four books one would take to a desert island finds, for me, one of its answers here in this wonderful, unique novel (for the record, the others would be Dostoevsky's Brothers Karamazov, Tolkien's Lord of the Rings, some good trash - maybe James Clavell's "Shogun" - and an anthology of poetry of my own choosing).

  • In this soliloquy on the inner life of six friends from childhood to the grave, Virginia Woolf takes the reader to a different experience of reading and even being. The Waves is not an easy read. It is not for the faint-hearted or for those looking for a rollicking story line but more akin to a poetic reflection in the manner of Proust's In Remembrance of Things Past.
    Interspersed with beautiful descriptions of the sea, there is a haunting prescience of the watery fate of Virginia Woolf.
    A remarkable book. Try it if you are strong enough!

  • I underlined so many phrases and sentences in this book. The language is beautiful and the characters' unique perspectives on the meaning of life are enthralling.

  • I love reading this book and then walking around my neighborhood, enjoying the sights and sounds. Woolf’s work was groundbreaking.

  • This is one long beautiful poem. Though not intended as a poem, it is among the most beautiful and evocative prose I have ever read.

  • fine reprint of Woolf's experimental novel. Recommended