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ePub The Butterflies of Grand Canyon: A Novel download

by Margaret Erhart

ePub The Butterflies of Grand Canyon: A Novel download
Author:
Margaret Erhart
ISBN13:
978-0452295490
ISBN:
0452295491
Language:
Publisher:
Plume; 1 edition (December 29, 2009)
Category:
Subcategory:
Genre Fiction
ePub file:
1187 kb
Fb2 file:
1481 kb
Other formats:
lit azw mobi docx
Rating:
4.3
Votes:
562

MARGARET ERHART is the author of five novels. Her fourth, Crossing Bully Creek, won the Milkweed National Fiction Prize.

MARGARET ERHART is the author of five novels. Her essays have appeared in The New York Times, The Christian Science Monitor, and in several anthologies, including The Best American Spiritual Writing 2005. She lives in Flagstaff, Arizona, and teaches creative writing to elementary school students. She is a hiking guide in Grand Canyon. Praise for Crossing Bully Creek.

Margaret Erhart's fiction has been compared to that of Jane Austen Well, the heroine of THE BUTTERFLIES OF GRAND CANYON is named Jane, if that means anything.

Margaret Erhart's fiction has been compared to that of Jane Austen. I've never joined that club, although I have tried a couple of times, unsuccessfully, to read EMMA, never getting more than fifty or so pages in before losing interesting. Well, the heroine of THE BUTTERFLIES OF GRAND CANYON is named Jane, if that means anything. And she is an Emma-like character, I think, based on my aborted attempts at that Austen book. Set in 1951, BUTTERFLIES has several major characters and encompasses as many points of view, making it all that much more interesting.

Start by marking The Butterflies of Grand Canyon as Want to Read . In her latest novel, set in the quintessential landscape of the Southwest, Margaret Erhart weaves history, science, and an intimate knowledge of the human heart to tell a fast-paced tale.

Start by marking The Butterflies of Grand Canyon as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

The Butterflies of Grand Canyon. Set against the backdrop of the brooding and sensual canyon, a young woman's heart awakens and a decades-old mystery is solved When Jane Merkle arrives in the tiny town of Flagstaff, Arizona, with her much older husband on a summer day in 1951, she hasn't any idea that her life is about to change forever.

Margaret Erhart wanders into entomology, river running history and practice, the politics of. .com User, November 28, 2009.

Margaret Erhart wanders into entomology, river running history and practice, the politics of National Parks and the history of The Canyon, marital ethics and difficult. The Butterflies of Grand Canyon: A Novel names many of the beautiful invertebrates: Rheingolds, cloudless sulfurs, painted ladies, pygmy blues, green darners, and queens. Near the great natural gash in the earth's crust, some of the human collectors of these delicate creatures find themselves passing through stages of development similar to those of the specimens they've netted.

Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

The Butterflies of Grand Canyon by Margaret Erhart. Ring of Lies by Karen Laugel. Fresh Kills by Bill Loehfelm The finalists are:.

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Margaret Erhart's fiction has been compared to that of Jane Austen This book is more of a mystery novel, with the intrepid Miss Elzada Clover. This book is more of a mystery novel, with the intrepid Miss Elzada Clover called in to solve the identity of the corpse found in Emery Kolb's garage.

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Set against the backdrop of the brooding and sensual canyon, a young woman's heart awakens and a decades-old mystery is solved When Jane Merkle arrives in the tiny town of Flagstaff, Arizona, with her much older husband on a summer day in 1951, she hasn't any idea that her life is about to change forever. After all, one of Jane's favorite sayings is "When in Rome, remember that you're from St . Louis." But over a summer spent with her sister-in-law, Dotty, and Dotty's lepidopterist husband, Oliver, in a village perched on the rim of the Grand Canyon, Jane discovers her latent ability with a butterfly net and her attraction to a handsome young ranger. Meanwhile, an unidentified skeleton is found on the premises of one of the village's most cantankerous citizens. With the help-and hindrance-of a colorful cast of historical characters, including an eccentric botanist who moonlights as an amateur sleuth, the murder mystery that has haunted the town for years is solved. In her latest novel, set in the quintessential landscape of the Southwest, Margaret Erhart weaves history, science, and an intimate knowledge of the human heart to tell a fast-paced tale.
  • This funny book is primarily of interest because of its characters (most of them quirky) and their developing insights. However, there also is a complicated and sufficiently suspenseful plot that crosses time and the vast space of the Grand Canyon.

    Reading about butterflies and the complications of love, we laugh at the oddities of human encounters while the mystery unfolds its secrets.

    Why ask for formula, when the elements of corpse (sort of), detective (kind of), and clues (cleverly revealed) can be a vehicle for something more than just a genre novel: this is an intelligent, enjoyable read on many levels.

  • Margaret Erhart's fiction has been compared to that of Jane Austen. I've never joined that club, although I have tried a couple of times, unsuccessfully, to read EMMA, never getting more than fifty or so pages in before losing interesting. Well, the heroine of THE BUTTERFLIES OF GRAND CANYON is named Jane, if that means anything. And she is an Emma-like character, I think, based on my aborted attempts at that Austen book.

    Set in 1951, BUTTERFLIES has several major characters and encompasses as many points of view, making it all that much more interesting. There's Jane Merkle, married to Morris, old enough to be her father. There's Oliver Hedquist and his wife Dottie (Morris's sister). And there is Elzada Clover, a University of Michigan botanist who comes across as a kind of trousered Miss Marple, and is a repressed lesbian with unrequited tender feelings for her younger, married assistant, Lois Jotter Cutter.
    Euell Wigglesworth (does that sound Austen-ian?) is the young park ranger, an entomologist who falls crazy in love with Jane, who falls in too - love, I mean, with Euell. So all these various points of view come into play in the course of the story.

    There is a murder mystery here too, although it takes something of a back seat to the love stories. Yes, plural, because there are a few going on here, both requited and "un-". The mystery gradually gets sorted out and is fully explained by story's end, although the explanations seemed to me a bit contrived and tacked on as an afterthought. The love stories though - Jane and Euell, Oliver and Dotty, Dotty and Lowell, Morris and Martin (huh?). Well, they too get sorted out in the end.

    Jane is probably the most interesting of the characters as the reader watches her slowly transform, unfold her wings and fly - just like those butterflies they are all pursuing. The pace of the story is a gently unfolding walk, picking up to perhaps a canter or trot by the end. The early fifties and that era's attitude toward sex and marriage are accurately reflected. But there is a kind of openness here too. Consider Euell's private thoughts about Jane, who he knows is a married woman, but still -

    "Her bottom reminds him of a ripe pear. Her breasts are plump, like two peaches ... If a man finds beauty in a woman's body, what's the harm in it. If he wants to see her naked, wants to hold her and press his skin against hers and ..."

    Whew! But hell, what's the harm indeed? There is, in fact, a kind of overt innocence running throughout the story, despite its continuous overtones of adultery and sexual longing. Turns out the buttoned-up fifties weren't quite so buttoned up after all.

    This Margaret Erhart knows how to write, how to create sympathetic and memorable characters. I may have given up on Austen, but I may have to one day try another from Erhart. A most enjoyable read.

    - Tim Bazzett, author of the memoir, BOOKLOVER

  • In this novel, Margaret Erhart often uses compelling evocative phrases pregnant with deep meaning in a style reminscent of Faulkner and Hemingway. She captures the early 1950s, post World War II life, where men and women had proscribed roles with well understood behaviors but underneath the surface lay churning emotions from the primoridal soup of the id (unconscous mind) just waiting for the right moment to be expressed. These inexpilicable human drives although subtley expressed in the beginning become very important in the end and make this novel a fascinating reading experience. The author sets the stage for some expected and unexpected events, filled with surprises. There are many interesting contrasts in the book all of which add up to an enjoyable reading experience. I found the personalities of the characters believable and three dimensional. I could easily form pictures of each unique person in my mind. The novel has the making of a best seller because it contains a murder mystery, romance, more than one secret rendevous which includes cheating on one's spouse, and adventure, all occuring within the magnificent setting of the Grand Canyon.

    The author begins the book with two companions climbing the Grand Canyon, one of whom ends up falling off a cliff, and although the reader is left quite a long time hanging to discover how this event is significant, overall it does not detract from the other fine elements contained within the book. Next, the author introduces the reader to Jane Merkel, a 25 year old pretty young lady who for many complicated reasons married a man nearly twice her age who could be her father. They are visiting Flagstaff, Arizona and the Grand Canyon for the first time. Here Jane awakens to a new sense of freedom she never before knew existed. The author excels at comparing and contrasting human behavior associated with fidelty, temptation and misbehavior, and the approach/avoidance conflicts which require resolution when human dilemmas arise. There are multiple subplots within this novel which involve the different characters and it makes for an interesting reading experience. Plus, there are butterflies, lots and lots of different species of butterflies, which adds another lovely dimension to this book. While I give this book a four star recommendation, I felt the resolution to the murder was handled a bit awkwardly and therefore deduct one star. Erika Borsos [pepper flower]