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ePub Can Such Things Be? download

by Ambrose Bierce

ePub Can Such Things Be? download
Author:
Ambrose Bierce
ISBN13:
978-1846371738
ISBN:
1846371732
Language:
Publisher:
Echo Library (June 26, 2006)
Category:
Subcategory:
Genre Fiction
ePub file:
1294 kb
Fb2 file:
1186 kb
Other formats:
lrf mobi mbr lrf
Rating:
4.1
Votes:
102

Can such things be? Fantastic fables.

Can such things be? Fantastic fables. OUR NEW NEIGHBORS AT PONKAPOG BY THOMAS BAILEY ALDRICH When I saw the little house building, an eighth of a mile beyond my own, on the Old Bay Road, I wondered who were to be the tenants.

I know more about Bierce himself than of his stories, except for the classic, "An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge", which is quite well known, and rightfully so. But Ambrose Bierce is one of those writers whose persona was at least the equivalent of his tales. I'll leave that to you to discover as I did, however; the joy is in the hunt! This rendering of "Can Such Things Be?" is excellent, a collection of Bierce's creepier tales.

Bierce Ambrose Can Such Things Be? - читать книгу онлайн бесплатно. I - one does not always eat what is on the table. 32. II - what may happen in a field of wild oats.

Ambrose Gwinnett Bierce (June 24, 1842 – circa 1914) was an American short story writer, journalist, poet, and Civil War veteran. His book The Devil's Dictionary was named as one of "The 100 Greatest Masterpieces of American Literature" by the American Revolution Bicentennial Administration.

Can Such Things Be? book. Once William Randolph Hearst - Bierce's employer, who was Ambrose Bierce never owned a horse, a carriage, or a car; he was a renter who never owned his own home

Can Such Things Be? book. Once William Randolph Hearst - Bierce's employer, who was Ambrose Bierce never owned a horse, a carriage, or a car; he was a renter who never owned his own home. He was a man on the move, a man who traveled light: and in the end he rode, with all of his possessions, on a rented horse into the Mexican desert to join Pancho Villa - never to return.

Can Such Things Be? brings together The Death of Halpin Frayser, The Damned Thing, The Moonlit Road, and other tales of terror that make Bierce the genre’s most significant American practitioner between Poe and Lovecraft. Ambrose Bierce: The Devil’s Dictionary, Tales, & Memoirs. In the Midst of Life (Tales of Soldiers and Civilians) Can Such Things Be? The Devil’s Dictionary Bits of Autobiography selected stories More.

A Son of the Gods and A Horseman in the Sky. Ambrose Bierce. The Moonlit Road and Other Ghost and Horror Stories. The Collected Works of Ambrose Bierce, Volume 8, Epigrams, On With the Dance, Negligible Tales. Black Beetles in Amber. Read whenever, wherever. Your phone is always with you, so your books are too – even when you’re offline. Bookmate – an app that makes you want to read.

Can Such Things Be? Once William Randolph Hearst - Bierce's employer, who was bragging about his own endless collections of statuary, art, books, tapestries, and, of course real estate like Hearst Castle.

Can Such Things Be? Once William Randolph Hearst - Bierce's employer, who was bragging about his own endless collections of statuary, art, books, tapestries, and, of course real estate like Hearst Castle - once William Randolph Hearst asked Bierce what he collected. Bierce responded, smugly: "I collect words. from Goodreads: -Ambrose Bierce never owned a horse, a carriage, or a car; he was a renter who never owned his own home.

Can Such Things Be? by Ambrose Bierce. The death of halpin frayser. He had been all day in the hills west of the Napa Valley, looking for doves and such small game as was in season. Late in the afternoon it had come on to be cloudy, and he had lost his bearings; and although he had only to go always downhill - everywhere the way to safety when one is lost - the absence of trails had so impeded him that he was overtaken by night while still in the forest.

This large print title is set in Tieras 16pt font as reccomended by the RNIB.
  • I know more about Bierce himself than of his stories, except for the classic, "An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge", which is quite well known, and rightfully so. But Ambrose Bierce is one of those writers whose persona was at least the equivalent of his tales. I'll leave that to you to discover as I did, however; the joy is in the hunt!

    This rendering of "Can Such Things Be?" is excellent, a collection of Bierce's creepier tales. Some are better than others, and the whole was a bit spoiled by the absence of his "Missing Persons" stories, most pointedly the infamous "The Difficulty of Crossing a Field". The complete edition can be found as an ePub on Google Books and can be converted to Kindle format rather easily if you're so inclined, but it lacks the attention to formatting and corrections this one has--all in all, a wonderfully done piece. As such, even with the omissions it's still a VERY worthwhile read with some wonderfully gruesome twists that will stay with you a long time. If you've never read Bierce, this is a terrific introduction and a wonderful free download; it was, in fact, the first for my new Kindle. I suspect you will enjoy it at least as much as I did!

  • It's always interesting to see how a genre developed. In this case, the genre is paranormal fiction. What we have here is a collection of mostly ghost stories and a little bit of sci-fi from a late 19th-century American writer. The stories are occasionally funny, mildly entertaining, and not at all shocking to readers used to today's horror and sci-fi tropes, but back then these stories must have been real head-spinners.

  • Ambrose Bierce was at his best with his horror and civil war stories. This collection of short stories includes both but focuses more on the horror. H.P. Lovecraft was fond of the opening story "The Death of Halpin Frayser" and this is an interesting tale, but I'd say the best stories in this volume are "The Monnlit Road", "Beyond the Wall", "The Middle Toe of The Right Foot", and "John Mortonson's Funeral". "The Damned Thing" ended up in the TV series "Masters of Horror".

    These stories have a unique flavor and transport you to 19th century America.

  • Nice collection of short horror/ supernatural stories. Of course it includes two stories that are the origins of names/places that were used by R. Chambers for his collection book The King in Yellow, which is to say Carcosa and what has been continued and influenced many authors (namely HP Lovecraft) and the lore used in the first season of True Detective.

  • If you enjoy period horror and odd stories, I suggest reading this.

  • Bierce's "An Inhabitant of Carcosa" and "Haïta the Shepherd" were both major influences on "The King in Yellow" by Robert W. Chambers, as well as being solid, good stories in their own right. I'm amazed no one's yet tried to turn them into a movie.

  • This book has the "Inhabitant of Carcosa" story in it which is referenced in True Detective, if that's what you're looking for, you just have to search the Kindle copy for Carcosa because the chapters aren't linked, but hey, it's free!

  • Nice set of ghost stories set in the late 1800's, presented as actual news stories. I picked it up to read some of Ambrose Bierce's work and enjoyed it.