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ePub The Liberated Bride download

by A. B. Yehoshua

ePub The Liberated Bride download
Author:
A. B. Yehoshua
ISBN13:
978-0151006533
ISBN:
0151006539
Language:
Publisher:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt; First Edition edition (November 3, 2003)
Category:
Subcategory:
Genre Fiction
ePub file:
1897 kb
Fb2 file:
1631 kb
Other formats:
lrf lrf docx doc
Rating:
4.3
Votes:
765

Yehoshua is the author of eleven novels, three books of short stories, four plays, and four collections of. .

Yehoshua is the author of eleven novels, three books of short stories, four plays, and four collections of essays, including Ahizat Moledet (Homeland Lesson, 2008), a book of reflections on identity and literature.

For information about permission to reproduce selections from this book, write to Permissions, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company, 215 Park Avenue South, New York, New York 10003. This is a translation of Kalah Ha-Meshaòhreret. The liberated bride/A.

PART I. A Village Wedding. HAD HE KNOWN that on this evening, on the hill where the village held its celebrations, an evening suffused by the scent of a fig tree bent over the table like another, venerable guest, he would again be struck - but powerfully - by a sense of failure and missed opportunity, he might have more decisively made his excuses to Samaher, his annoyingly ambitious.

Read The Liberated Bride, by . As they probe the causes of the bloody Algerian civil war, Rivlin also becomes obsessed with his son’s failed marriage.

The Liberated Bride book. The book was longer than necessary and I feel that parts were written as a way for Yehoshua to showcase his intelligence. This is the second book I've read by Yehoshua, so I had an idea what I was getting into: A multi - layered, elaborate and laborious novel. Immersing myself in it was quite a challenge: A plot that deals with many themes that merge every now and then.

Rivlin lay waiting for the dawn under an old woolen blanket in the unborn children’s room.

Rivlin lay waiting for the dawn under an old woolen blanket in the unborn children’s room ld bring a doctor, a family friend, to confirm his final adieu. Meanwhile, in the living room on the other side of the door, the translatoress sat up talking emotionally to the judge, seeking guidance. The two Arabs had left, each for his own destination

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Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. 1. Doğu Bilgeliği - Kılavuz Kitap.

PRAISE FOR THE LIBERATED BRIDE "Yehoshua, the most daring of the major Israeli writers, tells a simple story about a region that complicates all it touches. remains, somehow, hopeful. Yehoshua, who is 70 and a dove, has written a novel that incarnates the message to extraordinary literary effect.

Yohanan Rivlin, a professor at Haifa University, is a man of boundless and often naïve curiosity. His wife, Hagit, a district judge, is tolerant of almost everything but her husband's faults and prevarications. Frequent arguments aside, they are a well-adjusted couple with two grown sons. When one of Rivlin's students-a young Arab bride from a village in the Galilee-is assigned to help with his research in recent Algerian history, a two-pronged mystery develops. As they probe the causes of the bloody Algerian civil war, Rivlin also becomes obsessed with his son's failed marriage. Rivlin's search leads to a number of improbable escapades. In this comedy of manners, at once deeply serious and highly entertaining, Yehoshua brilliantly portrays characters from disparate sectors of Israeli life, united above all by a very human desire for, and fear of, the truth in politics and life.
  • This was my first experience with Yehoshua and I am permanently hooked. This complex, intensely human and beautifully translated story provides the reader with insights into the complicated and overlapping relationships that Palestinians and Israelis share and live out daily in Israel and the West Bank. The wide range of characters in the book is both typical and radically atypical in that Yeshoshua's people are dealing with normal family and day-to-day issues, but most of them are far from average in their professions, interests and awareness of the dangerous context that they live in. There's no way to adequately address the story line of this novel, other than to say that it just grabs you and pulls you in from the get-go. The characters are beautifully sketched, unfathomable at times, neurotic, loving and always interesting. The reader winds up caring deeply about them all. The only thing disappointing about the book was that it eventually ended.
    One final comment. I read this book for the Middle East Book Club that I have belonged to for some years. We rarely read fiction for this group, but this novel provided fodder for the best discussion we've had about the region for a long time. We are still arguing about the meaning of the title.

  • A perceptive look at human relationships in Israel at the turn of the 21st century. The book is beautifully written and highly nuanced. It also contains fascinating insights into modern academia (with close parallels to trends in the US) and the tension between traditional, archive-based scholarship and the sometimes superficial, high-sounding rhetoric of cultural studies. Mostly, however, Yehoshua offers a frank assessment of Israeli-Arab relationships, exposing the difficulties in personal relationships that arise from the political situation and exposing the seemingly insurmountable obstacles blocking a permanent solution, but at the same time with optimism and hope for the future. Highly recommended.

  • I liked the feeling of living in Israel and the Palestinian territory. I liked the mystery and the characters. There was too many pages of extraneous material

  • I kept waiting for a plot to develop but it never did. Lots of character development, but some of that was inconsistent with no rationale provided for the inconsistent behavior. The setting was very interesting; maybe that's what kept me reading to the end.

  • Well written but too long and too many subsidiary plots brought in. It needed a good editor. Yehoshua has a wonderful imagination.

  • An engrossing novel with very human characters, a story that continually held my interest, in a country (Israel) also of interest to me.

  • I'm reading this because it was chosen by my book club. However, I would not recommend it. I felt like I was plodding through its 550+ pages.

    It does show some insight into the Israeli/Arab conflicts based on ancient value systems.

  • I purchased this for a friend that is going to Israel as a missionary. She enjoyed the book, and said she would read it again.