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ePub Minding Ben: A Novel download

by Joyce Bean,Victoria Brown

ePub Minding Ben: A Novel download
Author:
Joyce Bean,Victoria Brown
ISBN13:
978-1452651064
ISBN:
145265106X
Language:
Publisher:
Tantor Audio; MP3 - Unabridged CD edition (April 19, 2011)
Category:
Subcategory:
Genre Fiction
ePub file:
1465 kb
Fb2 file:
1935 kb
Other formats:
mbr lit lrf rtf
Rating:
4.1
Votes:
622

In Minding Ben, Victoria Brown tells the story of Grace, an immigrant from Trinidad The novel was a little slow at parts. It picks up in the last 100 pages of the book where you can not put it down. Everything prior to is background, which can be disenchanting.

In Minding Ben, Victoria Brown tells the story of Grace, an immigrant from Trinidad. She arrives in New York City at the age of 16 to watch her cousin's son. However, when her cousin does not go to the airport to pick her up, Grace is forced to fend for herself. The novel was a little slow at parts.

Joyce Bean (Narrator). Minding Ben is darker and sadder than your traditional chick lit nanny book. Known as the land of opportunities, America is a place where many different people come together under common ground.

Minding Ben: A Novel. Written by Victoria Brown. Narrated by Joyce Bean. Minding Ben invites listeners into the private world of one of the anonymous West Indian babysitters who have peopled the lives of so many young urban families for decades. Grace left Trinidad for New York with hopes for a better life and education. As she struggles to adjust to her new life-and to determine just what shape her American Dream will take-Grace finds work as a nanny for the unconscionable Bruckners, a job that pays meager wages for its demanding and humiliating responsibilities.

MINDING BEN Victoria Brown For my mother, Agatha Ule Brown, who let me go. And in memory of Carolyn Helen . Welcome to Gray City. The free online library containing 450000+ books. Read books for free from anywhere and from any device. And in memory of Carolyn Helen Brown, and Daddy.

The rains had washed the city clean of its winter stains. Daffodils and tulips bloomed where before had. lain craggy formations of black snow and ice. The sun was warm, not hot yet, but I felt a deeper thaw in the chill that had been in my bones for ages. I stopped to look in a shop window where mannequins were decked out in miniskirts and shorts and polo jerseys in pastel blues and pinks and greens. One wore an orange halter with white strings

Narrated by Joyce Bean.

Narrated by Joyce Bean. What is Kobo Super Points? A loyalty program that rewards you for your love of reading. Explore rewards Explore Kobo VIP Membership.

Minding Ben invites listeners into the private world of one of the anonymous West Indian babysitters who have peopled the lives of so many young urban families for decades. Grace left Trinidad for New York with hopes for a better life and education

Minding Ben invites listeners into the private world of one of the anonymous West Indian babysitters who have peopled the lives of so many young urban families for decades.

Learn more about Victoria Brown. Browse Victoria Brown’s best-selling audiobooks and newest titles. Minding Ben. A Novel. Narrated by: Joyce Bean. Discover more authors you’ll love listening to on Audible. Length: 12 hrs and 41 mins.

Minding Ben. a captivating read This first novel by Victoria Brown is not just a good read, but it holds your attention throughout the entire book. I immediately became caught up in the life and experiences of 16 year old Grace Caton who came from Trinidad to NYC to find employment as a nanny (or child-care worker), but also to further her education because she had a life vision. Minding Ben is a far more substantial novel, full of prejudice and the injustices experienced by any group of people who find themselves in the position of the "underdog". The dialect was a distraction at times but was necessary for authenticity.

Joyce Bean is an accomplished audiobook narrator and director. In addition to being an AudioFile Earphones Award winner, she has been nominated multiple times for a prestigious Audie Award. Joyce lives in West Michigan. Other books by this Narrator.

Minding Ben invites listeners into the private world of one of the anonymous West Indian babysitters who have peopled the lives of so many young urban families for decades. Grace left Trinidad for New York with hopes for a better life and education. As she struggles to adjust to her new life-and to determine just what shape her American Dream will take-Grace finds work as a nanny for the unconscionable Bruckners, a job that pays meager wages for its demanding and humiliating responsibilities.At the mercy of her employers, and unprepared for the playground politics within the West Indian babysitting community, Grace nevertheless carries the day as she navigates the complicated world of America with strength and perseverance. Minding Ben offers a rarely seen account of the immigrant experience in this strong, compassionate, and insightful narrative.
  • In Minding Ben, Victoria Brown tells the story of Grace, an immigrant from Trinidad. She arrives in New York City at the age of 16 to watch her cousin's son. However, when her cousin does not go to the airport to pick her up, Grace is forced to fend for herself. She ends up living with a woman, Sylvia, and her three children in a delapidated apartment until she finds work as a live-in housekeeper and nanny for 3 year old Ben in Manhattan. Minding Ben follows Grace in her mundane lifestyle of being a live-in nanny five days a week for, in my opinion, an ungrateful couple. The book highlights the different cultures that Grace encounters in New York from the Jewish families she works for to the Caribbean nannies that she "befriends."
    The novel was a little slow at parts. It picks up in the last 100 pages of the book where you can not put it down. Everything prior to is background, which can be disenchanting. Brown does a good job of portraying the different cultures and using their dialect, which takes some getting used to in the beginning. Grace had a lot on her plate for a teenage girl in a new country. At times I wished that she took more initiative and stood up for herself to Miriam, but at other times, I understood that she was just a kid who was forced to grow up quicker than she planned. Overall, it was a good book if you're just looking for something to read to fill time.

  • "Minding Ben" by Vitoria Brown takes you on a journey with Grace from the Caribbean Island to Brooklyn, NY. Grace leaves her family behind to find a better life in Brooklyn NY. What she finds is the world of nannies. "Minding Ben" is slow moving and at times when I thought it was going to pick up and get interesting it did not. I also felt the ending was rushed and predictable.
    I did like the character Grace. I felt she had spunk and potential.

  • When I first started I was going to put it down, but with persistence I went on to the end. It was not a exciting at the beginning but it grew on me. It was good to read , with an exiting end. i recommend it..

  • Wow. Don't let the unassuming title and cover fool you. Minding Ben is a painfully honest tale, far more unflinching and complex in its treatment of immigration, race and poverty than the usual Hollywood-ready fare, but it's also frequently whimsical and laugh-out-loud funny, thanks to the refreshingly strong and self-aware characters at the heart of the story. From a dawn scene in the front yard of the narrator's house in Trinidad; to the backseat of a car parked outside a reggae club; to a playground where West Indian, East Indian, and Irish domestic workers mind their charges and negotiate subtle and intricate power relationships; to the heartbreakingly personal center of a race riot in Crown Heights; to an understatedly magical rooftop garden in downtown New York where time seems to stand still and anything feels possible; Brown pulls the reader into a mesmerizing world of carefully fleshed-out characters, several of whom you'll find yourself caring about and empathizing with even if, had you met them in the real world, you would be tempted to avoid and take sides against them. As an added bonus, a vibrant use of assorted distinct patois and the narrator's wry, first-person account make many sections enjoyable to read aloud. This is a deeply satisfying, rewarding novel that is worth re-reading and sharing.

  • If you like stories involving nannies, Brooklyn, race and class issues, women of color, West Indian immigrants in NYC, good writing, and/or three-dimensional characters you may not have met in other books, you should check this out. The author has a unique voice and a compelling main character, and her NYC is one readers may not be familiar with.

  • It was a joy to read this story full of rich details and engaging characters. I loved Grace and the way she moves between the different worlds that she is part of throughout the story.

  • In a stunning first sequence, Grace Caton wakes up in a tiny village in Trinidad and flies to Kennedy Airport. Leaving her loved ones behind, the teenage girl is off to live with relatives in New York. No one meets her plane and Grace is forced to find another way. Intelligence, hard work, and a supportive community ensure that Grace survives. The challenges she faces offer a rich view of New York from the perspective of a West Indian nanny.

    The author's fine-tuned ear renders West Indian dialect and several other versions of New York speech with precision. Brown's plot pits Grace against a city in crisis as well as a difficult employer. This novel works on multiple levels. A compelling story, a fine portrait of New York's complex class and race relations, and an unusually strong female protagonist will give multiple audiences exactly what they seek.

  • Not an interesting book... at all!! I recommend never wasting your money on this book :)