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ePub Woman from Shanghai: Tales of Survival from a Chinese Labor Camp download

by Xianhui Yang

ePub Woman from Shanghai: Tales of Survival from a Chinese Labor Camp download
Author:
Xianhui Yang
ISBN13:
978-0307390974
ISBN:
0307390977
Language:
Publisher:
Anchor; Reprint, Translation edition (August 24, 2010)
Category:
Subcategory:
Genre Fiction
ePub file:
1822 kb
Fb2 file:
1911 kb
Other formats:
doc rtf lit rtf
Rating:
4.6
Votes:
226

In Woman from Shanghai, Xianhui Yang describes in wrenching detail the squalid conditions and widespread starvation that only 600 of the 3,000 prisoners were able to survive.

In Woman from Shanghai, Xianhui Yang describes in wrenching detail the squalid conditions and widespread starvation that only 600 of the 3,000 prisoners were able to survive. Even some who lived to see their convictions reversed were forced to become paid employees of the labor camp. Despite these horrors, there are stories of selflessness and fortitude. Sarah Halzack, The Washington Post.

In Woman from Shanghai, Xianhui Yang, one of China’s most celebrated and controversial writers, gives us a. .The short stories in this book are based on interview that Xianhui Yang, the author, conducted from 1997 to 2003 with survivors of the camp.

In Woman from Shanghai, Xianhui Yang, one of China’s most celebrated and controversial writers, gives us a work of fact-based fiction that reveals firsthand-and for the first time in English-what life was like in one of Mao’s most notorious labor camps. Results of the interviews were "converted" into fiction to evade Chinese government censorship. These stories are both horrifying and encouraging.

In Woman from Shanghai, Xianhui Yang, one of China's most celebrated and controversial writers, gives us.In 1997, Xianhui Yang traveled to Gansu and spent the next five years interviewing more than one hundred survivors of the camp.

In Woman from Shanghai, Xianhui Yang, one of China's most celebrated and controversial writers, gives us a work of fact-based fiction that reveals firsthand-and for the first time in English-what life was like in one of Mao's most notorious labor camps. Between 1957 and 1960, nearly three thousand Chinese citizens were labeled Rightists by the Communist Part and banished to Jianiangou in China's northwestern desert region of Gansu to undergo reeducation through hard labor.

Translated by Wen Huang.

Tales of Survival From a Chinese Labor Camp. Translated by Wen Huang. Continue reading the main story.

9780307390974 In Woman from Shanghai, Xianhui Yang, one of China’s most celebrated and controversial writers, gives us a work of fact-based fiction that reveals firsthand-and for the first time in English-what life was like in one of Mao’s most notorious labor camps

9780307390974 In Woman from Shanghai, Xianhui Yang, one of China’s most celebrated and controversial writers, gives us a work of fact-based fiction that reveals firsthand-and for the first time in English-what life was like in one of Mao’s most notorious labor camps. Between 1957 and 1960, nearly three thousand Chinese citizens were labeled Rightists by the Communist Part and banished to Jianiangou in China’s northwestern desert region of Gansu to undergo reeducation through hard labor.

In 1997, Xianhui Yang traveled to Gansu and spent the next five years interviewing more than one hundred survivors of the camp. These are tales of ordinary people facing extraordinary tribulations, time and again securing their humanity against those who were intent on taking it away.

The book was adapted into Wang Bing's 2010 film The Ditch

Drawing on 100-plus interviews, Xianhui Yang’s 13 thinly disguised stories chronicle the brutality of the Jiabiangou labor camp in China’s Gobi Desert region. Between 1957 and 1960, some 3000 dissidents were sent to Jiabiangou.

Drawing on 100-plus interviews, Xianhui Yang’s 13 thinly disguised stories chronicle the brutality of the Jiabiangou labor camp in China’s Gobi Desert region. When the camp was shut down in 1961 because of mass deaths from starvation, only 500 had survived, through stealing, foraging, and even such horrifying means as culling excretions and harvesting corpses. These exiles men and women were subjected to horrific conditions, and by 1961 the camp was closed because of the stench of death: of the rougly three thousand inmates, only about five hundred survived.

In Woman from Shanghai, Xianhui Yang, one of China's most celebrated and controversial writers, gives us a work of fact-based fiction that reveals firsthand and for the first time in English what life was like in one of Mao's most notorious labor camps.

In Woman from Shanghai, Xianhui Yang, one of China’s most celebrated and controversial writers, gives us a work of fact-based fiction that reveals firsthand—and for the first time in English—what life was like in one of Mao’s most notorious labor camps.Between 1957 and 1960, nearly three thousand Chinese citizens were labeled “Rightists” by the Communist Part and banished to Jianiangou in China’s northwestern desert region of Gansu to undergo “reeducation” through hard labor. These exiles men and women were subjected to horrific conditions, and by 1961 the camp was closed because of the stench of death: of the rougly three thousand inmates, only about five hundred survived.In 1997, Xianhui Yang traveled to Gansu and spent the next five years interviewing more than one hundred survivors of the camp. In Woman from Shanghai he presents thirteen of their stories, which have been crafted into fiction in order to evade Chinese censorship but which lose none of their fierce power. These are tales of ordinary people facing extraordinary tribulations, time and again securing their humanity against those who were intent on taking it away.Xianhui Yang gives us a remarkable synthesis of journalism and fiction—a timely, important and uncommonly moving book.
  • "Woman from Shanghai" is a collection of biographical stories from several people in Chinese labor camps in the late '50s and early '60s. The author spent years tracking down former inmates, most wrongfully accused of having "ill" political thoughts, and interviewing them about their experiences in the desert prison.

    Very little judgment is passed. The biographies speak for themselves about the terrible system of repression and torture in China. The narratives focus on the harsh conditions. There is very little about the major political figures of the time, but plenty on local politics and relationships. Some of the stories are very emotional because of the tragic toll the labor camps and prisons took on people's lives.

    "Woman from Shanghai" is well-written. I'm sure much of the credit should go to the translator. The whole book reads well and is great for a lay person such as myself.

  • "Woman from Shanghai" is a novel, but based on factual occurrences happening in China during the 1950's through modern time. Each chapter is a vignette of someone who was imprisoned as a "rightist" in China. The book is very well written and quite memorable. Great title. You will meets the woman from Shanghai in this book. I highly recommend this book.

  • Detailed description of life and death inside a Chinese death camp during the early 1960s.

  • A very touching work!

  • The author's style is excellent. A masterful job at depicting just how brutal and manipulative the Communist regime was after the revolution in 1949. Ordinary citizens were suspicious of everyone, including family. Many in western culture, even today don't have any comprehension just how backward and poor China was in the fifties and sixties. It is incredible how an oppressive government can use fascist dogma, fear, and propaganda to suppress innocent and decent people to fall in line and abandon their moral standards.

  • Fascinating story wonderful prose and a window into pre and post revolutionary Shanghai and the resulting emigration. Life in Chinatown and the struggle to maintain their culture and traditions in Los Angeles. A great read.