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ePub Mirage: A Novel download

by Pauline Gedge

ePub Mirage: A Novel download
Author:
Pauline Gedge
ISBN13:
978-0060165413
ISBN:
0060165413
Language:
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers (January 1, 1991)
Category:
Subcategory:
Genre Fiction
ePub file:
1190 kb
Fb2 file:
1103 kb
Other formats:
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Rating:
4.2
Votes:
234

Mirage book Pauline Gedge draws her inspiration for the plot both from the life of the real.

Pauline Gedge (born December 11, 1945) is a Canadian novelist best known for her historical fiction novels, including the best-selling Child of the Morning, The Eagle and the Raven, her fantasy novel Stargate.

Pauline Gedge (born December 11, 1945) is a Canadian novelist best known for her historical fiction novels, including the best-selling Child of the Morning, The Eagle and the Raven, her fantasy novel Stargate, and her Egyptian trilogies, Lords of the Two Lands and The King’s Man. She also writes science fiction, fantasy and horror.

PDF download MirageAuthor : Pauline Gedge.

Pauline’s third novel Stargate was nominated for the Canadian SF and Fantasy Association’s Prix Aurora Award in 1983, a year in which no winner was declared.

These include French, German, Spanish, Dutch, Italian, Swedish, Finnish, Turkish, Norwegian, Danish, Portuguese, Greek, Czech, Slovak, Polish, Hungarian, Romanian and Russian. Pauline’s third novel Stargate was nominated for the Canadian SF and Fantasy Association’s Prix Aurora Award in 1983, a year in which no winner was declared. The Twelfth Transforming, Pauline’s last novel with Macmillan, took her and her fans back to Egypt with the story of Akhnaten from her unique and insightful perspective.

Free books to read or listen online in a convenient form, a large collection, the best . And like Pauline Gedge's critically acclaimed historical novels, it is written with a vividness that is unforgettable.

Free books to read or listen online in a convenient form, a large collection, the best authors and series. Twelve-year-old Amunhotep III has ascended the throne, becoming king of the richest empire on earth. The boy's mother acts as regent, but she has brought to court the renowned seer, Huy, son of a humble farmer, to be scribe and counsel to her royal son. It's a position of power and responsibility-one fraught with intrigue and the lure of corruption.

Pauline Gedge writes incredible books! . The first four of Pauline Gedge& novels featured the work of New York-based illustrators Leo and Diane Dillon, commissioned specifically for those novels by the publishers.

14 November 2017 ·. Pamies is my Spanish publisher and they've been wonderful. The first four of Pauline Gedge& novels featured the work of New York-based illustrators Leo and Diane Dillon, commissioned specifically for those novels by the publishers by Leo and Diane Dillon.

PAULINE GEDGE is the award-winning and bestselling author of thirteen previous novels, ten of which .

PAULINE GEDGE is the award-winning and bestselling author of thirteen previous novels, ten of which are inspired by Egyptian history. In France, her second novel, The Eagle and the Raven, received the Jean Boujassy award from the Société des Gens des Lettres, and The Twelfth Transforming, the second of her Egyptian novels, won the Writers Guild of Alberta Best Novel of the Year Award

by. Gedge, Pauline, 1945-.

by. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

Pauline Gedge (born December 11, 1945) is a Canadian novelist best known for her historical fiction trilogies, Lords of the Two Lands and The King’s Men. The Twelfth Transforming (1984). Scroll of Saqqara (1990) (published under the title Mirage in the . The Covenant (1992). House of Dreams (1994) (.

Flag as Inappropriate. Gedge wrote unpublished poetry for years. She tried to write contemporary mainstream fiction in the early 1970s and then gave up, turning to ancient Egypt for inspiration. Are you certain this article is inappropriate? Excessive Violence Sexual Content Political, Social. She based her first published novel, Child of the Morning, on the historical figure of Hatshepsut, Egypt’s only female pharaoh

In a tale of ancient Egypt, Prince Khwaemwaset, son of Ramses the Second, falls in love with the mysterious Tbubui, a woman with a terrible secret who contributes to the destruction of his family
  • Khaemwaset, son of Ramses the Great, is known as the first Egyptianologist because he tried to salvage older tombs damaged by tomb robbers, and discover who was buried there. He was also the Governor of Memphis, High Priest of Ptah, a physician, scholar and magician (which went along with physician and scholar). At one point he was the Crown Prince as well. According to ancient legend he searched all his life for the Scroll of Thoth, which would lead to power over the afterworld and probably eternal life, and the legend tells he found it, but as in any great story, having found it it destroyed all he loved most in life. Pauline Gedge, the best historical fiction writer of ancient Egypt, recreates this tragic story in her own way, and again makes this era of time come to seem real and relevant to us. Of all her books it seems the most magical and does touch on the occult, but makes it feel as true as the rest of the tale and, to be true to the story of Khaemwaset it had to be so. His legend and stories about him, the great magician and son of Egypt's greatest Pharoah, lived on for centuries after his death.

  • Pauline Gedge has outdone herself in this novel. I had read it years ago and have looked in second hand book stores for another copy ever since. Her novels of ancient Egypt are the best - you feel like you are right there along the banks of the Nile. I typed in the title on my computer - and there it was on Amazon! I immediately ordered a copy - I was in seventh heaven! If you love ancient Egypt - you will love the Gedge novels.

  • An enjoyable read. I enjoy historical fiction and have read many, many novels about ancient Egypt. Other author's on the same historical subject are much superior, e.g., Michelle Moran, Stephanie Dray, Stephanie Thornton, etc., etc.

  • Good transaction. Good book.

  • Though not as strong as most of her novels, Mirage is nonetheless interesting and a good read. This novel parallels very closely the ancient Egyptian story of Setna Khamuas. The main character in Mirage is prince Khaemwaset, who is historically a son of Ramses II and was regarded by the Egyptians as a great practitioner of magic. He is considered by modern scholars to be perhaps the first archaeologist and restorer of ancient antiquities. In the course of his restoration projects, Khaemwaset discovers an ancient unmarked tomb. Upon breaking the seals and entering, he discovers that this tomb is unlike any that he has ever before seen. Something dark resides here. Although the evidence confirms that this tomb has never before been opened, the lids of the two sarcophagi are askew and reveal the occupants... an ancient prince and his wife are entombed here. Sewn to the hand of the prince is a scroll. Khaemwaset removes the scroll with the intent to copy it for posterity, return it to the owner, and reseal the tomb. This is an ancient scroll which contains a magical spell. Not realizing the contents, Khaemwaset reads the scroll and sets in motion a magic of the darkest kind. This is a tale of greed, lust, and the consequences they entail. It is an ancient story which Ms. Gedge details in vivid prose. The fruits of darkness can be sweet indeed, but their aftertaste is acidic and deadly.

  • The central protaganist in this story is Prince Khaemwaset, an egyptian prince of royal blood, son of Ramses II, physician, sem-priest and magician. Although he is in line for the royal throne, he has no political ambitions, and even though he is his father's favourite, the overriding desire in his life is to locate the Scroll of Thoth, which is said to grant immortal life. With the help of his son, Hori, he excavates ancient Egyptian tombs, but is always dissappointed until the day he finds an unlooted, but mysterious tomb. Unintentionally he unleashes the dark magic residing in this tomb, and sets in motion forces that will haunt him and his family, and show him how high is the price of arrogance, pride and the pursuit of all knowledge. As always, Pauline Gedge, brings to life the daily life of ancient Egypt, from lowliest servant, to scribe to royal princes. This story is no exception, however I found that the story sagged midway, and the climatic ending was anti-climatic, and could have been reached sooner. The story could have used a little more twists in the middle.

  • I read this book years ago, and was recently reminded of it when I came upon a transcription of the original Ancient Egyptian story on which it was based. (See Standing in Motion's reference above.)
    Gedge is able to evoke an easily believable Egypt - one can almost feel the sun on your face, and smell the Great River. All of her novels are meticulously researched and the reader is drawn into authentic history through the medium of story.
    I sincerely recommend this book to anyone who enjoys fiction based in Ancient Egypt, or in fact, to anyone who is looking for something absorbing and out of the ordinary. You don't need to know anything about Ancient Egypt to feel completely at home.

  • Pauline Gedge is perhaps the best author currently writing Ancient Egyptian Historical Fiction. I enjoy her work tremendously. She creates complex, believable characters and gives the breath of life to a rich, beautiful culture that flourished by the Nile several thousand years ago. While not her best work (my personal favorite is Child of the Morning), Mirage is an enjoyable read which showcases Gedge's attention to detail and character development.