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ePub The Borderland: A Novel of Texas download

by Edwin Shrake

ePub The Borderland: A Novel of Texas download
Author:
Edwin Shrake
ISBN13:
978-0786865796
ISBN:
0786865792
Language:
Publisher:
Hachette Books; 1st edition (April 5, 2000)
Category:
Subcategory:
Genre Fiction
ePub file:
1932 kb
Fb2 file:
1442 kb
Other formats:
mbr lrf rtf lit
Rating:
4.9
Votes:
897

In this epic novel set in 1839, author Edwin Shrake, himself a Texan, presents a portrait of Texas as it was, a. .

There were fortunes to be made, vast areas of land to be gained, and battles to be fought and won. Skillfully woven into the action-filled narrative are true historical figures, wrenching love stories, and riveting battle scenes - all ingredients of superb historical fiction. I'm sure the era was as rough and tumble as described, if not close to it, and Shrake does us Texans all justice with it.

by Edwin Shrake and George Guidall. See it on texasmonthly. If you love Austin, you need to read this book

by Edwin Shrake and George Guidall. If you love Austin, you need to read this book. You'll be surprised at what you'll learn about the town. signed) Mike Levy, publisher, TEXAS MONTHLY. Published by Thriftbooks. com User, 19 years ago.

Everybody knows the story of the Alamo and the Texas victory over the Mexican army at San Jacinto, but the dramatic period that followed-the years when the Republic of Texas was not yet part of the United States-has largely been ignored. Edwin Shrake's novel makes up for that. The fledgling Republic is down on its heels, desperate for money, short on organization, lacking structure and infrastructure, and still at war with Mexico.

Shrake takes the reader back to the tumultuous days of 1839 and 1840 as the Republic struggles to stay afloat. Shrake's treatment of the Comanches seems shallow by comparison.

In this epic novel, veteran writer Edwin Shrake explores the feuds and alliances among Americans, Mexicans, and Indians, the political treachery, and the tales of fortune-hungry settlers that combine to tell the story of how Texas was born

In this epic novel, veteran writer Edwin Shrake explores the feuds and alliances among Americans, Mexicans, and Indians, the political treachery, and the tales of fortune-hungry settlers that combine to tell the story of how Texas was born.

Edwin "Bud" Shrake is one of the most intriguing literary talents to emerge from Texas. He has written vividly in fiction and nonfiction about everything from the early days of the Texas Republic to the making of the atomic bomb. His real gift has been to capture the Texas Zeitgeist.

Edwin A. "Bud" Shrake, Jr. (September 6, 1931 – May 8, 2009) was an American journalist, sportswriter, novelist, biographer and screenwriter. He co-wrote a series of golfing advice books with golf coach Harvey Penick, including Harvey Penick's Little Red Book, a golf guide that became the best-selling sports book in publishing history.

Bibliographical information (record 179506). NEAR EAST UNIVERSITY GRAND LIBRARY +90 (392) 223 64 64 Ext:5536. Near East Boulevard, Nicosia, TRNC This software is developed by NEU Library and it is based on Koha OSS conforms to MARC21 library data transfer rules.

In this epic novel, veteran writer Edwin Shrake explores the feuds and alliances among Americans, Mexicans, and Indians, the political treachery, and the tales of fortune-hungry settlers that combine to tell the story of how Texas was born. Set in the blossoming frontier town of Austin, The Borderland focuses on the lives of Romulus and Cullasaja Swift, the half-Cherokee offspring of two forward-thinking parents who have come to Texas from New York; of Henry Longfellow, a rapacious lawyer; and of Captain Matthew Caldwell, a Texas Ranger whose eccentric ways are matched only by his fierce bravery.
  • The Borderland is the 3rd Texas Historical fictional book (around the settler days of early Texas) I've read by Shrake, and it deserves high praise. I'm sure the era was as rough and tumble as described, if not close to it, and Shrake does us Texans all justice with it. What a fun read! If you have boys aged 12-14 who are not fans of reading, introduce them to this book or read it to them. It will engage their imaginations and maybe turn them into readers. Custer's Brother's Horse is another really good tale by Shrake that anyone could enjoy reading, as is Blessed McGill. I have most recently read Shrake's book, Billy Boy, which is mostly about golf in and around Fort Worth in the 1950's. It, too, is an enjoyable read, especially for a young golf fan. bill

  • This novel is a compelling account of the adventures of a Texas Ranger, a veteran of San Jacinto, and his interactions with a half-Cherokee brother and sister. Settings in San Antonio, Houston and Austin add interest, but the most compelling portions of the story are those involving the Comanches. Accurate descriptions of the Council House fight, the big raid and the Plum Creek battle heightened my interest. The author included some magical elements which I thought were unnecessary. Descriptions of everyday life in the Republic were very well done.
    I'd buy it again.

  • This is one great novel; the very best from the underappreciated author of two other classic works of fiction: "Blessed McGill" (the story of the first Saint of North America) and "Strange Peaches" (the first Kennedy conspiracy theory book). Shrake has reached his peak with the Borderland which gets at the real heart of the founding of the nation of Texas, the period after the Alamo and before admission to the Union during which Sam Houston moved the Capitol west to the middle of a Comanche paradise (oh, how we wish Austin was still a paradise), setting off a 40 year war with the Comanches and ethnic cleansing of the Cherokees. Imagine Austin with a Capitol Building surrounded by a stockade fence and a moat and protected by cannons against attack. It's bigger than life because these people were bigger than life. The climax of the book comes with the biggest Comanche raid in history which ended with the Texas Rangers triumph and slaughter of the Indians at Plum Creek south of Austin. I could give you a dozen other great scenes, but skip to the chase and simply read this book; it's a winner!

  • The real story of diverse Texas.

  • I really enjoyed the geographical and historical reference and the in depth descriptions of characters. I ordered another book by this author.

  • Book was wrong type and no other was sent. Softcover instead of hardcover. Refund made, but so what?

  • In `The Borderland', Edwin Shrake has given readers a highly entertaining, if at times fanciful tale of the old Texas Republic. Shrake takes the reader back to the tumultuous days of 1839 and 1840 as the Republic struggles to stay afloat. The city of Austin has recently been named the new capital and settlers of all stripes are flooding to that beautiful locale on the Texan Colorado River.

    Shrakes populates his tale with a number of real historical characters, such as President Mirabeau Lamar, Albert Sidney Johnston, the Cherokee Chief Bowl, and a seemingly highly fictionalized rendition of Texas Ranger Captain Matthew Caldwell (called `Old Paint' because of his oddly colored beard). Shrake also creates some quite original fictional characters like the half-Irish, half-Cherokee brother and sister team of Dr. Romulus Swift and Cullasaja Swift.

    Shrake's epic takes in the major events such as the Council House Fight, where treachery by Lamar and the Texas Army caused the slaughter of more than a dozen Comanche chiefs who had been enticed to peace talks by promises of rich gifts. This double-cross infuriated the Comanche and led to the famous Great Raid by several thousands of `prime' warriors who swept down all the way to the Gulf of Mexico. The Texans, led by the Rangers, made an improbably successful stand at the Battle of Plum Creek.

    The book covers much the same time and territory as another work of historical fiction, Not Between Brothers: An Epic Novel of Texas by David Marion Wilkinson but in this reviewer's opinion, not as well. Shrake's treatment of the Comanches seems shallow by comparison. Shrake's main characters are just a bit too perfect; too strong and too beautiful. If I had to choose between them I would take Wilkinson's Not Between Brothers. But, fortunately I don't have to choose. Both books are well worth a read.